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Hauser M1 jig borer spindle?

vuohi

Plastic
Joined
Jun 17, 2013
Location
Finland
Hi all,

I recently bought a Hauser M1 jig borer without a spindle. It seems next to impossible to find an original spindle, but there are plenty of "close, but no cigar" type solutions. The best one I've come across yet is a belt driven Gepy spindle, which uses 8mm horological collets, which I have plenty of. The drawback is that this spindle is a bit too short. The Gepy would be in my price range, and I do know there are some electric motor and compressed air operated spindles out there, but unfortunately they cost a fortune. I don't need extreme RPM, so a belt driven one would do just fine.

The spindle housing is about 115mm long and according to my measurement it should accept 25mm OD spindles. The spindle needs to move up and down inside the housing about 20-30mm via a hand operated lever. The Gepy spindle is nominally 104mm long, but it might be possible to modify it. The needed length for the spindle is about 130-150mm + the pulley, or whatever is driving the unit and of course a bit of space to attach the lever to.

Any ideas or suggestions?
 
You're right that they are next to impossible to find. Hauser sold many of these machines with just scopes, and when the dealers do end up with an extra spindle they keep it to make a complete machine.

Gepy will make a custom long spindle. Their stuff is really nice, honestly nicer than the original Hauser stuff in my opinion. Imagine about double normal price (I spoke to them about this 8 or so years ago, so the price might not be accurate). I've seen machines that have been retrofitted with motor spindles and it seems that nobody has been very happy with them.

Do keep in mind that the body of the spindle (quill) will have to be lapped to fit your head bore. They head is normally slightly undersize, I've seen as small as 24.94mm, but often it is just a couple of hundredths. This is a tedious but doable task if you have a lathe you can chuck the spindle body in. It will have to be disassembled of course, and cooled and cleaned well before testing in the bore. Just don't cool it too much- it might slip in and then be stuck like hell when the temp equalizes! The last one I lapped took about a day and a half, going slowly, to remove about .025mm The fit has to be extremely close for the work the machine was designed to do- you don't want to get hasty and miss the mark.
 
Hey Screwmachine, and thanks for the reply.

OK, so my inside micrometer probably wasn't off at all… I got a measurement of 24.98mm for the bore. It doesn't look worn at all, and the microscope and the center punch both measure about 24.97 or a bit less. Lapping the spindle is not a problem, and really the only problem I can see with the stock Gepy is the length. I'll have to contact Gepy about a custom spindle and ask for a quote. Double the stock price is a bit uncomfortable, but doable.

The Hauser spindle isn't exactly the best design there ever was, and if you break it, pretty much no-one will touch it for any reasonable price. It might be a bit risky buying one, even if I'd happen to find one. I'd really much rather go for a brand new unit.

I've been told that motor driven spindles tend to vibrate too much for drilling very small holes. I don't know if this is the reason people aren't happy with them, but if it's true, it would make sense.
 
You're right that they are next to impossible to find. Hauser sold many of these machines with just scopes, and when the dealers do end up with an extra spindle they keep it to make a complete machine.

Gepy will make a custom long spindle. Their stuff is really nice, honestly nicer than the original Hauser stuff in my opinion. Imagine about double normal price (I spoke to them about this 8 or so years ago, so the price might not be accurate). I've seen machines that have been retrofitted with motor spindles and it seems that nobody has been very happy with them.

Do keep in mind that the body of the spindle (quill) will have to be lapped to fit your head bore. They head is normally slightly undersize, I've seen as small as 24.94mm, but often it is just a couple of hundredths. This is a tedious but doable task if you have a lathe you can chuck the spindle body in. It will have to be disassembled of course, and cooled and cleaned well before testing in the bore. Just don't cool it too much- it might slip in and then be stuck like hell when the temp equalizes! The last one I lapped took about a day and a half, going slowly, to remove about .025mm The fit has to be extremely close for the work the machine was designed to do- you don't want to get hasty and miss the mark.


Well, I asked for a quote, and you were right. The price is about twice that of the stock 104mm. So, I'm pretty sure I'll order one.

But I do have a question about the lapping process, or rather how to disassemble the spindle. It looks simple enough to do it, but is there any risk of losing cocentricity? I have asked Gepy about this, but I just thought to ask your opinion as you say you've done this a few times.

The actual lapping is nothing new to me, but I've never lapped a spindle of any kind.
 








 
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