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Hauser m5 jig borer, assistance needed

L.Joey

Plastic
Joined
Aug 29, 2023
Hey guys,
Im looking at a Hauser m5 jig borer and im struggling to find some information on it. I wanted to know if this machine could be used for milling applications or was it not recommended? i understand the SIP hydroptic 6a and models above had this capability.
Any help or information on the machine would be much appreciated.

Regards
Luke
 
The machine uses number 4 Morse taper tooling and has a maximum spindle speed of 2000 RPM. There might be a draw bar that is used to retain the tooling when side loads are present.

You need to find out if tool holders for this spindle are available at competitive prices.
You need to determine if a 2000 RPM spindle is fast enough for your anticipated work.
You need to verify that there are power feeds in the X and Y axis designed for milling in addition to the rapid feeds for positioning.
You need to verify that there are working digital scales fitted to the X and Y axes.
The jig bore table is not designed for flood coolant.

 
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Hey guys,
Im looking at a Hauser m5 jig borer and im struggling to find some information on it. I wanted to know if this machine could be used for milling applications or was it not recommended? i understand the SIP hydroptic 6a and models above had this capability.
Any help or information on the machine would be much appreciated.

Regards
Luke
Luke,
The Hauser machines used lead screws to move the axis's. This will cause wear on the screws degrading the accessory of the machine, also the only power feed on them is the down feed on the spindle. They have two handles to move each axis, one would be the rapid and the second one would be a fine feed one would be too fast to mill and the second would be two slow, later machines have power feed but its just for rapid. I don't know what its like in Australia where your at but here in the states a SIP 6 or 6A seems to go for about $2,500 at auction. there is a later machine from SIP a 620 which has 2 axis CNC control those don't seem to bring much either. You could also look at machines from Mitsui-Seiki there number corresponds to SIP's sizes 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. all the M-S machine use optical scales to measure so you can mill with them. You might have better luck finding a M-S that a SIP being closer to Japan.
 
The other option is a Urawa jig mill. This will have a BT40 taper on the spindle, preloaded ball screws, glass scales, a Fanuc 6m 3 axis controller and a very slow tool changer. The price will be about the same as the manual SIP jig borer.
 
They were imported by Yuasa through their Culver City, CA distribution center. I have seen four of them in a row at a Los Angeles shop. They were being sold for near scrap price. The machines weigh about 15,000 lbs. I have one of them.
The jig mill was a joint effort by NSK which supplied the ball screws and spindle bearings, Heidenhain which supplied the .0001" resolution glass scales, and Fanuc which supplied the control and servos. In the late 1970's a milling machine that could control position within + or - .0002" was unusual. They were manufactured for about 10 years. A few models were made with the Fanuc 11 series control.
 
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Luke,
The Hauser machines used lead screws to move the axis's. This will cause wear on the screws degrading the accessory of the machine, also the only power feed on them is the down feed on the spindle. They have two handles to move each axis, one would be the rapid and the second one would be a fine feed one would be too fast to mill and the second would be two slow, later machines have power feed but its just for rapid. I don't know what its like in Australia where your at but here in the states a SIP 6 or 6A seems to go for about $2,500 at auction. there is a later machine from SIP a 620 which has 2 axis CNC control those don't seem to bring much either. You could also look at machines from Mitsui-Seiki there number corresponds to SIP's sizes 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. all the M-S machine use optical scales to measure so you can mill with them. You might have better luck finding a M-S that a SIP being closer to Japan.
Thankyou very much for your response, knowing this ill give it a miss and keep my eye out for something else. I have seen a sip hydroptic 6 pop up for sale some time ago but they aren't exactly common around here.
 
Luke,
The Hauser machines used lead screws to move the axis's. This will cause wear on the screws degrading the accessory of the machine, also the only power feed on them is the down feed on the spindle. They have two handles to move each axis, one would be the rapid and the second one would be a fine feed one would be too fast to mill and the second would be two slow, later machines have power feed but its just for rapid. I don't know what its like in Australia where your at but here in the states a SIP 6 or 6A seems to go for about $2,500 at auction. there is a later machine from SIP a 620 which has 2 axis CNC control those don't seem to bring much either. You could also look at machines from Mitsui-Seiki there number corresponds to SIP's sizes 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. all the M-S machine use optical scales to measure so you can mill with them. You might have better luck finding a M-S that a SIP being closer to Japan.
Could you mill on a “ DIXI “ ?

Regards Tyrone.
 








 
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