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Have Canode upped their game yet?

Richard, ask them for the details on the medium/carrier. Grease like traditional spotting compound, or thickened water-base like Canode? I'd love a recipe for the latter.

........

The problem with solvent-based types (water is a solvent) is that the solvent evaporates, and the properties then change. Water is really bad, because the speed of evaporation depends on humidity. In winter, when I typically have more time for repairs, Canode evaporates to a cakey sludge very fast. In humid summer, it is slower.

It would be fine if the consistency of the "dried" material (after the water leaves) was good, but it isn't. I've been looking for some available substance that would help with that, and so far have not found one compatible with the water. I was hoping that one of the glycols would work, but the ones I have access to are too thin, and the result is smeary.

Grease, as the HiSpot blue seems to be based on, is really a good medium*. So far beats everything that is compatible with water. HiSpot blue is almost the perfect material..... except for the semi-permanent stain it puts on hands.

* You'd expect that, a long-chain molecule, very low vapor pressure, so does not evaporate, and the blue thins out to the faintest of hazes, as the grease can exist in very thin layers indefinitely without changing properties. HiSpot seems to use a grease type that does not separate into soap and oil. Maybe a relative of vaseline.
 
I ran across a suggestion that is somewhat in-line with Richard King's suggestion, but different.

The suggestion was for Canode which has done the "sucked-in-bottle" trick, and is now too thick. The idea was to dilute the Canode with Windex.

I had tried spraying the Canode with Windex before, but did not have good results. However, I tried diluting the bottle of too-thick Canode with about 10% or 15% of "Original" Windex, and that was quite a bit different.

It did kind-of dry, but when "dried" it retained the ability to mark well, and seemed to "thin out" more the way that HiSpot does. I do not know if the "soap" content that I assume Windex has was responsible for that, or what.

But, I regard the Windex-diluted version of Canode as perfectly acceptable for most purposes. It seems to behave better than the straight material.

One comment.... This was with Canode that I have had for some time. I have no idea what it will do with the newly re-released version.

SDS for Windex is not very informative:


However the maker also has another site, with more info:


I see that there are several "wetting agents" and cleaning agents. Presumably there is some interaction that improves the performance of Canode.
 
I talked about that in one of the other thread about scraping. If you're not reading the other threads you should (members reading this) . It's titled learning to scrape with Richard Kings help. I talk about how I deleted it. I squirt straight yellow or red canode out about the size of a silver dollar and squirter 3 or 4 full pumps of Windex in it. I use a paint pan and a small foam roller. I've never used it straight for redhead substitute. I call it highlighter. It thinned and it stays inside the pours of the iron. Then I rub off 99% of it with a red rag. You then wipe of the highlighted part with your hand. It has to be dry to the touch..
 

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The suggestion was for Canode which has done the "sucked-in-bottle" trick, and is now too thick. The idea was to dilute the Canode with Windex.

I had tried spraying the Canode with Windex before, but did not have good results. However, I tried diluting the bottle of too-thick Canode with about 10% or 15% of "Original" Windex, and that was quite a bit different.


But, I regard the Windex-diluted version of Canode as perfectly acceptable for most purposes. It seems to behave better than the straight
+1 for this, I have two new 32oz bottles of yellow and blue that I bought from artco last summer when I heard here on PM that it was available again.
I expect it to be a lifetime supply. Not my lifetime, just that of the product.
I squeeze out a spiral on the plate and spray no more than one squirt of windex on it. like this it behaves well, otherwise it is far too sticky when unadulterated.
 
I have found something interesting that may be worth noting, as long as this has come up again....

The Canode that was mixed in the bottle with Windex had been applied to the straightedge, and not cleaned off. I found that it was still usable, giving quite decent marking, a week later. I had it covered with thin plastic, but the original Canode would have been dry and unusable even so.

Why? No real data. The soap content of the Windex may have something to do with it, or it may be another effect entirely.

This is "old Canode", so it may not apply to the new version.
 
I have the new Canode from Artco in Blue, Yellow, and Red. I find it works very well and doesn't dry out on my through multiple spottings - I also have Dykem and Stuart's on hand as well as a wasted purchase of the terrible greasy water blue mentioned before.

For the Canode Blue, I put out a spot the size of a dime, then squeeze out an equal size spot of Charbonnel Aqua Wash Etching Ink. I use an artists pallet knife to scrape up and thoroughly mix the two (if you don't the Charbonnel sticks to the plate and won't mix with just a roller). I do this at the suggestion of Richard and it really works. Canode straight without dilution doesn't work nearly as well and has the drying issues. I believe the Charbonnel is what helps this as it is in fact oil based, but is some special linseed oil emulsion concoction that will still clean up just as well with water as Canode does. This gives the Canode a little less tendency to evaporate and lets it behave more like the oil based Dykem/Stuarts. Give it a try if you haven't - it makes all the difference and Charbonnel is relatively cheap and a tube lasts FOREVER. I mainly use the Prussian Blue color but also like Ultramarine. I have a thought to try mixing the red Canode with some Sanguine (orangish red) color I bought to see if it works well as a highlighter but haven't done it yet as I've been "Learning to Scrape with the help of Richard King" as the OP of the post he mentioned above.

As to the yellow Canode I was using it straight as a highlighter and it worked but would mostly wipe off so was still getting a decent glare from my huge amount of LED lights I put in. In that thread Richard suggested highly diluting it with windex and that's definitely worked well to get it down in the pores of the iron - just make sure to wipe it off and let it dry for a few minutes so it doesn't affect your print.
 
I think I have a new highlighter. A 50/50 mix of canode red and Charbonnel Aqua Wash Sanguine. One big spritz of windex on the plate then spread the mix around. My LED lights make it look like there’s still glare but in person it’s totally matte and the blue really pops.
 

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Leaving water based Canode on any iron based tooling, especially with Windex (ammonia) mixed in, seems like a bad idea. I noticed some oxidation on my cast iron plate when I left it on for a week or so. I'd clean it up at the end of the day, just to be safe.
 
Leaving water based Canode on any iron based tooling, especially with Windex (ammonia) mixed in, seems like a bad idea. I noticed some oxidation on my cast iron plate when I left it on for a week or so. I'd clean it up at the end of the day, just to be safe.
Agreed. I noticed the same thing after only a few days leaving it on. So I clean it off after each run of scraping with kerosene which leaves a bit of oil behind and protects it.
 
Leaving water based Canode on any iron based tooling, especially with Windex (ammonia) mixed in, seems like a bad idea. I noticed some oxidation on my cast iron plate when I left it on for a week or so. I'd clean it up at the end of the day, just to be safe.
With the Canode, and in the wintertime here at 20% humidity, the water has gone in a few minutes at most. Usually within seconds of spreading it out. Never seen any rust at all. There may be a rust inhibitor in Canode.

Depending on water, or any other volatile solvent, to remain in a material which is spread out extremely thin on a surface, is not gonna work. That's essentially the issue with Canode to begin with.

The water is likely intended only as a "carrier", which is fine. The rest of the ingredients should provide the long term viscosity. And, with a mix of the old Canode and Windex it seems to retain just enough. Without the Windex, the stuff hardened up into a sort-of "paint". Acted a lot like the "finger paint" that I remember from when I was a young kid, actually, except that Canode always was just a hair "waxy" rather than truly dried/hardened.
 
With the Canode, and in the wintertime here at 20% humidity, the water has gone in a few minutes at most. Usually within seconds of spreading it out. Never seen any rust at all. There may be a rust inhibitor in Canode.

Depending on water, or any other volatile solvent, to remain in a material which is spread out extremely thin on a surface, is not gonna work. That's essentially the issue with Canode to begin with.

The water is likely intended only as a "carrier", which is fine. The rest of the ingredients should provide the long term viscosity. And, with a mix of the old Canode and Windex it seems to retain just enough. Without the Windex, the stuff hardened up into a sort-of "paint". Acted a lot like the "finger paint" that I remember from when I was a young kid, actually, except that Canode always was just a hair "waxy" rather than truly dried/hardened.
Have you tried mixing it equally with Charbonnel as Richard suggests? I’ve never had any need for windex doing that.

Also it wasn’t so much rust as it was a discoloration where the blue spots would remain after I cleaned the plate - but without blue.
 
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There is definitely some oil content in Canode. I had a small pot of yellow standing for a few years and the oil separated out to the surface.

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I've never seen it separate. But I basically just use the blue or red.

Might be something to do with the yellow particularly.

No, have not tried the Charbonnel, probably won't anytime soon, since the Windex mix works for me. And I have lots of HiSpot blue.

Even if mixed with an oil base, the water would still be in the Canode, so if there were rust potential, it might not be reduced much. But I have not seen a problem.
 
Yeah rust is not really the right word for it. It’s more of a mark left by the blue spots - it’s like you can still see the spots but all the blue is gone - I assume some small amount of corrosion in the pores of the iron. But acetone removes it pretty easily and it only happens if I leave the canode on for several days. Overall not really a big issue.
 
If solvent removes it, that seems as if it is some oily residue, or a solid that is left when the rest of the material is washed or wiped off.

I wipe off with 90% isopropyl alcohol, and I see nothing left except once in a while I may see a slight blue tinge that did not clean off. That's without leaving the spotting any significant time. Isopropyl alcohol will dissolve some oily materials, so maybe it removes whatever you have seen.
 
If solvent removes it, that seems as if it is some oily residue, or a solid that is left when the rest of the material is washed or wiped off.

I wipe off with 90% isopropyl alcohol, and I see nothing left except once in a while I may see a slight blue tinge that did not clean off. That's without leaving the spotting any significant time. Isopropyl alcohol will dissolve some oily materials, so maybe it removes whatever you have seen.
It’s some sort of corrosion because I had to scrub lightly with a grey scotchbrite. If it was oil just wiping would take care of it like it does the rest.
 








 
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