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Have Canode upped their game yet?

I've left canode on a surface for a few days before and it turned a kinda green colour and took a squirt of brake cleaner and a bit of rubbing to remove. It definitely wasn't rusty.
 
Never seen the green, but as mentioned, I cover with a piece of plastic film after each spotting, to keep dust off.
 
I've left canode on a surface for a few days before and it turned a kinda green colour and took a squirt of brake cleaner and a bit of rubbing to remove. It definitely wasn't rusty.
Yes that’s it - definitely not rusty - but just something odd going on down in the pores that’s not rust exactly but definitely isn’t just leftover color. In any case it’s not really severe or difficult to deal with in any way. Just an interesting sidebar.
 
Never seen the green, but as mentioned, I cover with a piece of plastic film after each spotting, to keep dust off.
Usually I never leave spotting blue on the part for this very reason. I clean and oil bare cast iron when I pack up and clean the plate too. The few times it's happened is because I've took a break for mealtime etc and got distracted by visitors or something.
 
So, I finally did get back on the scraping job, and cleaned off the Canode/windex mix to put on a new coating.

There is absolutely NO discoloration or corrosion of any sort visible. The scraped surface of the SE looks as it did when I started using it.

It does not look as if the Canode/Windex mix has any corrosion problems, at least not in the low humidity winter months when the water tends to evaporate pretty quickly from the very thin film.

Note that I cover the surface between spottings, and left that cover on while I was not working with the SE.
 
So, I finally did get back on the scraping job, and cleaned off the Canode/windex mix to put on a new coating.

There is absolutely NO discoloration or corrosion of any sort visible. The scraped surface of the SE looks as it did when I started using it.

It does not look as if the Canode/Windex mix has any corrosion problems, at least not in the low humidity winter months when the water tends to evaporate pretty quickly from the very thin film.

Note that I cover the surface between spottings, and left that cover on while I was not working with the SE.
Probably more to do with where you live than the canode as it definitely does have corrosion issues in places with year round humidity like we have where I and others live. It won’t stop me from using it as not having blue stained hands far outweighs the very slight corrosion it causes in the very limited cases where it stays on for a few days. I think covering it probably contributes as well as any kind “sealing” of the surface would tend to limit moisture entry. I may try that here as an experiment to see if it changes anything since the discoloration is so easy to remove. I believe it’s not so much water in the canode as it is hygroscopic and attracts moisture from the air.
 
So, I finally did get back on the scraping job, and cleaned off the Canode/windex mix to put on a new coating.

There is absolutely NO discoloration or corrosion of any sort visible. The scraped surface of the SE looks as it did when I started using it.

It does not look as if the Canode/Windex mix has any corrosion problems, at least not in the low humidity winter months when the water tends to evaporate pretty quickly from the very thin film.

Note that I cover the surface between spottings, and left that cover on while I was not working with the SE.

Not sure why everything is always so contentious here. I was merely warning people that water based marking inks (despite presumably having corrosion inhibitors) are still water based, and some caution should be used when exposing precision ferrous surfaces for extended periods. Chemistry is what it is, water and iron are gonna do what they do, even if you add stuff to try and slow them down. I don't think leaving it on for a day or two is an issue, but when I was doing experiments trying to compare Canode to some of the domestic oil based compounds, one of the things I was testing was workability over longer terms. Essentially, how well did the ink transfer and the consistency after a day, several days, a week, a month. During that test I had to cut it short as I had the unpleasant discovery that the Canode (covered in plastic wrap to prevent excessive drying) had caused some limited discoloration and corrosion to my plate. I don't blame them, I don't think it's a show stopper issue, I just wanted to tell people to keep this in mind in case they get sidetracked in the middle of a project (don't we all?) to consider cleaning their plate or straight edge rather than leaving it on there for extended periods.

Honestly if you disagree, by all means do what makes you happy. The effort and cost of cleaning the plate/tool between uses isn't enough for me to risk my surfaces. Frankly I prefer the feel and look of the oil based stuff, the mess hasn't been a big enough deal for me to fiddle with finding the perfect Canode mix (although I do use the Canode Yellow for contrast) but I have a lot of it and I'm sure will give it another chance at some point. Again, I don't think its bad or improperly formulated, just give it some thought if you leave it on for extended periods.
 
No intent whatever to be contentious. Just noting what I found, since there was some concern that leaving it in place would corrode things. I was curoius what I would find, and though others might be as well.

It's pretty humid here all summer. It gets pretty hot and pretty high humidity, 35 to 40C, and up near 100%. At 100% when raining, of course. But I do have the shop dehumidified reasonably well, just to make it possible to work and not rust everything. That may have an effect on the corrosive tendencies. I try to keep it down to between 45% and 55%.

At this time of year, humidity inside is around 10 to 20%. Whatever water content is present, pretty much disappears in just a short time. We are dealing with films in the area of .025mm and less.

At 50% humidity, there may be more water content, even in the thin film, just by equilibrium considerations. Might be possible to estimate that by electrical conductivity.

Covering? Dunno. Not sure if it would make it worse or better. I cover just for dust and swarf.
 
I think we’re all driving at the same idea - figuring out best methods and the various results that happen from them. It’s a good discussion and all evidence is good evidence.

I live in Alabama so even in the winter we are 50-60% humidity indoors. Outside anywhere from 70-10000% outdoors particularly in the summer.

Since I’m on a house renovation project this weekend I set up a quick experiment with my cast iron surface plate I’ve been scraping in. On the left my usual 50/50 canode/Charbonnel mix. On the right a canode/windex mix and in the middle the bare plate. I cleaned the whole plate with brake cleaner before bluing and used red canode/Charbonnel on the left and red canode/windex on the right as a highlighter. Blue was spread with a granite straight edge.

I’ll leave this on for a few days and see what happens. It’s been raining for three straight days here so currently quite humid.
 

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To be a bit contrarian, I really don't understand the blue stained hands thing with oil based blue. Doesn't everyone use barrier cream when working? I find that blue washes off with no problems at all at the end of a session.
 
To be a bit contrarian, I really don't understand the blue stained hands thing with oil based blue. Doesn't everyone use barrier cream when working? I find that blue washes off with no problems at all at the end of a session.
Well. Shit. I don’t because I straight up never thought of it 😂
That being said it also stains my plate which really isn’t the biggest deal but the canode doesn’t and works fine for me. I do switch to Dykem when I want a very light print.
 
To be a bit contrarian, I really don't understand the blue stained hands thing with oil based blue. Doesn't everyone use barrier cream when working? I find that blue washes off with no problems at all at the end of a session.
I only have experience with the oil based stuff here in Japan, and the staining on my hands isn't horrible, it mostly washes off. It's really easy to use, and doesn't change consistency (dry out) when I'm using it. I also don't worry about leaving it on the Iron plate for a time. That said, the Canode cleans up easier, and everyone can decide what trade offs they want to make. But if you've only used Canode it's probably worth giving a good oil based one a try at least, you might like it.
 
I only have experience with the oil based stuff here in Japan, and the staining on my hands isn't horrible, it mostly washes off. It's really easy to use, and doesn't change consistency (dry out) when I'm using it. I also don't worry about leaving it on the Iron plate for a time. That said, the Canode cleans up easier, and everyone can decide what trade offs they want to make. But if you've only used Canode it's probably worth giving a good oil based one a try at least, you might like it.
Yeah with everything I’ve said I definitely still prefer Dykem just not the staining
 
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I've not had good results with barrier cream. The oily stain seems to dissolve in the barrier coating, so there still is some on my hands. Or it wears off and leaves areas stained where it is worn off. But I may not have used the right stuff. It was years ago, and I don't think I have any left, so no name to mention.

I have to have meetings where I would rather not look like a smurf, or as if I did not wash my hands. So it doesn't take a lot of color to be undesirable. Usually it's clean on the fingerprint area, but stained around the fingernails. That fingernail area does not clean up well at all, and it looks bad in meetings.
 
I wear PU gloves when scraping I know it's not 'the convention' but I do it and I get along just fine.Sometimes when scraping a reference face I'll work bare handed. For the times when I'm not wearing gloves I might use PR88 barrier cream which dries on your skin and then you'll wash your hands clean no matter how dirty you got them.
 
There are, definitely, greasy barrier creams for dry work and dry/clay barrier creams for greasy work.

I often wish that my finger nails got long enough to get stains under them before I nicked them and had to trim them down!
 
When the Canode gets like the yellow 1 1/2 Oz bottle I flip off the removable spout. And stick in a 1/16" Allen wrench and then put it in a drill press and mix it up. Something I add a little windex in it too.
 
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There are, definitely, greasy barrier creams for dry work and dry/clay barrier creams for greasy work.

I often wish that my finger nails got long enough to get stains under them before I nicked them and had to trim them down!
It's less the "under", and more the area around the top surface of the nails (cuticle? dunno what to call the side portions) as well as the sides of the fingers, which are all generally chapped and have crevices into which the pigment gets, and does not come out.

I end up with a lot of blue in the cracks and chapped areas. Maybe I didn't get enough barrier cream in there, dunno. I'm more old-school, and gloves of any type don't let me feel what I am doing. Good for moving metal pieces and schlepping stuff I am scraping, but not for the actual scraping.

What I used as barrier was more of a greasy stuff, and the grease-based HiSpot pretty much dissolved in it.

I am definitely not very knowledgeable about barrier creams.
 








 
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