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HELP, Indicating a vice, on a X/Y Table which is built into a Rotary Table

Bohicaman

Plastic
Joined
Oct 12, 2021
I have an Advance cross slide rotary, and it does have its uses,(and yeah it's heavy...300ish pounds). There are way easier and faster methods to do this job. A chuck in a dividing head or an indexing head would be the way I'd go. The drawing appears to show that this is an assembly and there are multiple pieces, is that right?

If you don't have an indexer or dividing head you can use this table but there's no reason the table and vise need to be fully centered for a hole pattern. Use the cross slides to set the part zero (while rotating the table) with an indicator mounted on any solid part of the machine, then sweep the part with the spindle rotation (indicator mounted in spindle) to zero the spindle on center.

Calculate the hole offset to the first hole and move the milling machine table (not the rotary slide) to that location. Drill your first hole, then rotate the rotary table the correct number of degrees to the next hole, etc.

Appreciate the info. I'll give it a try very soon! Busy week!
 

Bohicaman

Plastic
Joined
Oct 12, 2021
Do you even have enough room left for a drill chuck?
Get rid of all that unnecessary complexity.
Put the part in a vice directly on the mill table.
Center the spindle on the part with DTI.
Use and XY bolt hole calculation table to find your locations.
Sell that thing and get yourself a DRO and a regular rotary table


Interesting idea! Thanks!
Bob:scratchchin:
 

Bohicaman

Plastic
Joined
Oct 12, 2021
Thanks to all!! With your comments I was able to figure it out. Will post some pictures as the build advances!
B.
 

chip-load

Plastic
Joined
Jul 12, 2019
Sorry to bump a mature thread but I’m surprised nobody addressed the OP question of milling the flats. As posted many times, positioning the holes is trivial using just the mill’s x,y translation. No rotary is needed. For the OP’s benefit please see the coordinate constants that will give you a precision 10 bolt circle.

However, I’m having trouble with the flats. Because I don’t like that much stick-out, I would switch from vertical to horizontally on a spin indexer, indexing head, or rotary table. I have seen Yuasa’s that can be mounted vertically but I doubt the OP’s system could hang that much mass horizontally!

So, lacking all of the indexing stuff how would you do it? Assume the holes are reamed and you could use a dowel for hole location. Or . . . stay vertical and use the existing rotary? Your thoughts?

Chart.jpg
 

CarbideBob

Diamond
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Location
Flushing/Flint, Michigan
Sorry to bump a mature thread but I’m surprised nobody addressed the OP question of milling the flats. QUOTE]

This is not that old of a thread.
Once the part is centered by using the slides on top of the rotary milling the flats easy-peasiy.
Same with the holes. Move only one axis on the mill to the offset. Drill, spin and drill again. No math or other needed.
The whole trick is to use the upper slides to make this into something like a spin indexer.
Alternate use is when wanting to cut a certain size radius tangent to two flat sides on a full manual machine.
This is where this type gizmo shines.
Bob
 

eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
Sorry to bump a mature thread but I’m surprised nobody addressed the OP question of milling the flats. As posted many times, positioning the holes is trivial using just the mill’s x,y translation. No rotary is needed. For the OP’s benefit please see the coordinate constants that will give you a precision 10 bolt circle.

However, I’m having trouble with the flats. Because I don’t like that much stick-out, I would switch from vertical to horizontally on a spin indexer, indexing head, or rotary table. I have seen Yuasa’s that can be mounted vertically but I doubt the OP’s system could hang that much mass horizontally!

So, lacking all of the indexing stuff how would you do it? Assume the holes are reamed and you could use a dowel for hole location. Or . . . stay vertical and use the existing rotary? Your thoughts?

View attachment 333524

Actually, he didn't ask that, just mentioned that he would have to do it eventually. There are lots of ways to do that. You can use the holes and pins with an indicator to set up with trig, you could use a collet block, you could use an indexer the same as was mentioned for the holes. Millions of ways to skin that cat. Tell us what equipment you have and we can suggest a good one for you.
 








 
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