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Help me pick a bench top turret lathe?

I need hundreds, not thousands of parts, but enough different parts that if I go CNC I need to be able to have live tools so I can cut gearing…
 
Hi HikeKing21:
You wrote:
"I need to be able to have live tools so I can cut gearing…"

Woah, that is a BIG new ask.
How did we get from a manual Schaublin 70 to a full-on live tooled lathe capable of cutting gears in a single thread?
This is not just ambitious, it's crazy ambitious.

There are gear hobbing attachments that will go on a Swiss lathe or a MillTurn, but the attachment alone costs more than a brand new Schaublin.
You can fake a spur gear on a live tooled lathe just like you can on a milling machine with an indexer, but why would you, if you can buy a little hobber or gear shaper and get proper gears out of it, or even better, farm this specialized work out to a manufacturer who has the gear and the knowhow to make a proper job of it.

I don't want to burst any bubbles here, but this is going to be EXPENSIVE and it's going to be really hard to justify unless you're made of money and don't mind losing your ass to prove a point and have some fun.

Now if it's just a simple spur gear you're after a simple gang chucker like mine will do it so long as it has a C axis and you are willing to set it up and single point broach your teeth, but it's not gonna be efficient, and it's not gonna make AGMA class 10 gears.
No live tooled lathe needed.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
FWIW, I often put drills and such into the tool holder on a QC tool post. Sure, it's not a turret, but I can change them very rapidly. Reset position and go to town. Gear cutting is another matter and other than watchmaking type setups, I do that on the mill.
 
There was a guy around South Detroit somewhere a few years ago that was selling plans for turret lathe accessories for a Sherline lathe and that might be something to consider if you are really limited to a benchtop lathe. You will be limted to really small depths of cut in steel, though. FWIW, Clausing and Rockwell both sold bed turrets for their 12-in (Clausing) and 11-in (Rockwell) lathes and I know that Clausing also had a production cross slide as my lathe has one that doesn't get used. At ~ 1,000 lks, though, neither of them qualifies as what I think of as a bench top lathe. Accessories for the Clausing 5900-series lathes are probably a lot easier to find than those for the Rockwell lathes.
 
My Clausing 5900 12 x 36 lathe is a standard engine lathe on a steel cabinet, but I also have a factory turret and lever cross slide. It is a very capable machine, whether with or without the turret equipment. And no way is it a bench lathe.

I am very fond of my vintage Hardinge bench lathe and my similar age (WWII) Hardinge ESM59 9 x 18 lathe. Like the Clausing, I have a turret and lever cross slide that can replace the slide rest and tailstock on either Hardinge. But these are heavy machines. The bench lathe is on a bench I made and is probably nearly as heavy as the ESM and its steel cabinet. The bench lathe is not terribly heavy by itself, but it takes a lot of iron to support it and provide the drive.

Larry

59 flat belt 2.JPG
 
Hi HikeKing21:
You wrote:
"I need to be able to have live tools so I can cut gearing…"

Woah, that is a BIG new ask.
How did we get from a manual Schaublin 70 to a full-on live tooled lathe capable of cutting gears in a single thread?
This is not just ambitious, it's crazy ambitious.

There are gear hobbing attachments that will go on a Swiss lathe or a MillTurn, but the attachment alone costs more than a brand new Schaublin.
You can fake a spur gear on a live tooled lathe just like you can on a milling machine with an indexer, but why would you, if you can buy a little hobber or gear shaper and get proper gears out of it, or even better, farm this specialized work out to a manufacturer who has the gear and the knowhow to make a proper job of it.

I don't want to burst any bubbles here, but this is going to be EXPENSIVE and it's going to be really hard to justify unless you're made of money and don't mind losing your ass to prove a point and have some fun.

Now if it's just a simple spur gear you're after a simple gang chucker like mine will do it so long as it has a C axis and you are willing to set it up and single point broach your teeth, but it's not gonna be efficient, and it's not gonna make AGMA class 10 gears.
No live tooled lathe needed.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
I like you. :)
 
I have a friend with a Schaublin 70, which I would love to find if I could here in the Midwest, but it seems like hens teeth around here.

So my question is, if I need a benchtop lathe for small parts making, for musical instrument tuning machine parts, can you all help me identify what platform that is out there might be my best option?

I need to be able to do small batch production of parts, and in each piece I need to:

1. feed bar stock to a predefined length
2. Size to needed diameter
2. Round end
3. Dish 1/2” from end
4. Part

Then I need to set up for a second operation on the rear side:

1. Bore to width and depth
2. Peck for drill hole
3. Drill hole
4. Tap hole

The Turret on the schaublin, plus the tool holder that has very handy depth stops for the long axis work, is so attractive…

Are there any benchtop platforms that readily have a turret and production style lever carriage with depth stops that I could find and put together?

Thanks!
I have 3 Logan 11 inch turret lathes that would do that job. They have legs on them but you could remove them. I also have a Hardinge dv59 that would be perfect for short run production jobs in fact that is what they were made for.
 
The Smart & Brown Model L machines are pretty much the UK equivalent of the Schaublin 70. Might be a few around State-side.

A bit more hefty in the headstock and turret to my eyes. Generally found on seriously heavy cast iron cabinet stands with just enough room for a serious motor under the headstock. Overall a little smaller than a Hardinge.

Over the last century or so the number of parts quickly and accurately made on such small industrial lathes in both turret and simple guises must be way beyond convenient, or even inconvenient, counting so they are very effective machines. But there is no getting away from the heft and stiffness needed to take serious cuts on turret jobs.

Clive
 








 
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