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Hendey lathe serial 25634 value

Eisfisher 3

Plastic
Joined
Feb 20, 2024
Location
Webster,WI
Hello again, my 2nd post as a new comer to the site. I posted a photo of a 12x5 hendey this am regarding a question of the value of this lathe. At the time of my question I didn't know the age of the lathe. I now know from the serial number the lathe is 101 years old having been manufactured in 1923. A member here provided a response and for that I am greatful. My current lathe is a South bend 9a that has substantial ways wear near the head making it more than a bit difficult to turn parts with any degree of accuracy. Not to mention the end play in the cross slide screw and slop in the gibs. The SB is a early 40s era machine. I don't want to make a mistake and get another lathe that is equally bad, or worse. Can anyone out there help with my purchase anxiety? How much can a 101 year old lath be worth? Any comments would help! Thanks Eisfisher3
 
I would not go more than $400 if it is in decent shape, maybe double that if there is a lot of tooling with it. There are way more old lathes out there than there are people who want them.
 
The seller has been trying to unload that machine for a while now. Says he just wants what he has into it but that's not always a reality. 50% of his price is more realistic and even then is on the high side.

Now that could change if the lathe is in like new condition from either not being used much or having been properly rebuilt - as is rescraped, not just cleaned and painted.

Best bet is to go see the lathe in person. Ask to make some test cuts and measure for taper. He may not have leveled the machine so take that into account. Look at the ways, spindle nose, compound and top of saddle. Those surfaces will give a good account on how the lathe was used. Heavily dinged and gouged then it was probably beat on.

As mentioned there are a lot of old lathes out there, some in much better shape than others. Hendey made a top class machine but a lot can happen to any machine in 101 yrs.
 
It's a bit like buying meat. The bigger the piece, the lower the price per pound....
But seriously, if you have the room, i recommend you look for a larger machine in decent shape. My Mid 30's Reed Prentice 14x30 weighs in between 3 & 4K lbs and will hold .001 all day long. It cost me $850 but i had to haul it and unload on my end. Fortunately, the seller could load onto my trailer and i could unload on my end. Smaller machines cost more as they are more in demand to hobbyists.
 
Hello again, my 2nd post as a new comer to the site. I posted a photo of a 12x5 hendey this am regarding a question of the value of this lathe. At the time of my question I didn't know the age of the lathe. I now know from the serial number the lathe is 101 years old having been manufactured in 1923. A member here provided a response and for that I am greatful. My current lathe is a South bend 9a that has substantial ways wear near the head making it more than a bit difficult to turn parts with any degree of accuracy. Not to mention the end play in the cross slide screw and slop in the gibs. The SB is a early 40s era machine. I don't want to make a mistake and get another lathe that is equally bad, or worse. Can anyone out there help with my purchase anxiety? How much can a 101 year old lath be worth? Any comments would help! Thanks Eisfisher3
I have a SB 9 as well, still do. My advice is wait and find a more modern lathe in good working condition. I waited and kept looking and found a newer Cadillac and could not be happier. It does everything I want and more well. No rebuilding, no parts worries, no problems. A hundred year old lathe is going to be a problem, if you want to rebuild a lathe go ahead, if you want to make things wait and get a good lathe. My two cents anyway. Buy the way I wish I had bought a newer lathe years ago instead of making due with the small SB. Cheers from Arizona!
 
Hello again, my 2nd post as a new comer to the site. I posted a photo of a 12x5 hendey this am regarding a question of the value of this lathe. At the time of my question I didn't know the age of the lathe. I now know from the serial number the lathe is 101 years old having been manufactured in 1923. A member here provided a response and for that I am greatful. My current lathe is a South bend 9a that has substantial ways wear near the head making it more than a bit difficult to turn parts with any degree of accuracy. Not to mention the end play in the cross slide screw and slop in the gibs. The SB is a early 40s era machine. I don't want to make a mistake and get another lathe that is equally bad, or worse. Can anyone out there help with my purchase anxiety? How much can a 101 year old lath be worth? Any comments would help! Thanks Eisfisher3
There are rusty examples if you actually want a project. Pat Black did a bang up job on his
 

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Hello again, my 2nd post as a new comer to the site. I posted a photo of a 12x5 hendey this am regarding a question of the value of this lathe. At the time of my question I didn't know the age of the lathe. I now know from the serial number the lathe is 101 years old having been manufactured in 1923. A member here provided a response and for that I am greatful. My current lathe is a South bend 9a that has substantial ways wear near the head making it more than a bit difficult to turn parts with any degree of accuracy. Not to mention the end play in the cross slide screw and slop in the gibs. The SB is a early 40s era machine. I don't want to make a mistake and get another lathe that is equally bad, or worse. Can anyone out there help with my purchase anxiety? How much can a 101 year old lath be worth? Any comments would help! Thanks Eisfisher3

Eisfisher 3:

As I have mentioned over the last eighteen years, Serial Number books are a god guide line for determining the age of
most Hendey products, but are by no means accurate.

Hendey lathe No. 25634, a 14" x 6', Cone Head model, was completed on April 22, 1925. It was shipped with a Compound
Rest, an Oil Pan, a Taper Attachment, a set of No.3 Collets and a Sub-Headstock. The original owner was the Eclipse Machine Company, Elmira, New York. There are no longer any Patterns, Castings or Repair Parts left in inventory for this lathe, but all of the original drawings are still in the files, so parts can be made if required. This lathe is considered a 1922 design model.

Hendeyman
 








 
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