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Hendey Norton 2B Universal Milling Machine

tmloos

Plastic
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Location
Akron, OH
Hello,
I am cleaning up a farm that I recently purchased. The building I am working on now was a machine shop and had collapsed. Inside is this Hendey Milling Machine. It obviously needs to be restored, but I think it's worth saving. It would be a shame to scrap. Does anyone have an interest in this, or know of someone? I live near Akron, OH.
Thanks!
 

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Only because there are so few around
(notice I did not use the word Rare),
might make someone who loves
the Hendey brand save it for their
shop. Maybe they also have a Hendey
lathe, and want it to have a buddy
machine next to it. Other than that,
sad to say not many people will see
the value in this machine. I have a
T&G and I have been to the factory
in Torrington, so I get it. But I have
tooooo mannnnnny milling machines
to be interested in this sad case of
a mill. Maybe someone will love it.
I think LeBlond mills are kinda rare
too, and fall into the same category.


-Doozer
 
I'd say it's worth saving. It's not "valuable" given it's age and obvious condition, but it looks to be complete and has a lot of extras with it. It's going to take a lot of elbow grease to bring it back, but it can be done. Logistics are the biggest issues with cases like this because the guy who has time and space to save it is often on the wrong side of the country. Even if you don't have the resources or skill to save it, the best thing is to be patient and vet potential buyers by their knowledge of the item and if they seem like they have a genuine interest in it, not by how fast they can get it gone or how much money they'll give you for it. Lots of decent machines end up at the scrap yard because the owner just wanted it gone ASAP. That's their prerogative obviously, but "saving ol' 'arn" doesn't make money.
 
There also appears to be a camelback drill press on the right side of the second picture... with it's base sunk in the ground.

An idea of what you would like to get for the Hendey, some information about how difficult it would be to get a trailer to it, and whether you have a method to load it would help build some interest...

I might be interested... I'm a few hundred miles away, but have been known to drive farther than that for the 'right deal'... but due to the amount of work involved to get it useable, the 'right deal' would be pretty low for me.

I do hope someone saves it, though.

-Bear
 
That No2 Universal was once a nice machine, I know as I have one.
Also, being a good hillbilly I know that security is having a parts-car in the backyard. If you cannot find anyone to restore it I could use it as an organ-doner for my current Hendy, but I would rather see someone restore it.
 
I took 3 Crown Victorias to the junk yard.
I own 2 more. But you are right, it is good
to know where parts machines are.
And my buddy owns the junk yard.

Funny fact... I junked those 3 cars like
5 years ago. Got a random phone call
from my junkyard buddy, and he said,
"Hey Dooz... You left a box of grinding
wheels in the trunk of one of your cars.
Do you want them ?"
I had to think a minute, but could not
remember. So I stopped by after work
and found my old ride, and sure enough,
in the trunk was a wood box full of ID
grinding wheels. Like 50 of them.
I had bought a Heald ID grinder from a
housiery mill in NC, and I must have
had them in the trunk, and never
taken them out. Then the car sat in
my yard for a few years before I junked
it, and I forgot about them.
Well I retrieved the box and thanked my
buddy. Getting older and loosing memory
is a bitch.

-Doozer
 
If R.I. was not a million miles away I would be there tomorrow to pick up that machine. Note that it is the very rare 2G Universal. The G is for gear-drive spindle rather than belts and cones. The spindle has its own Norton gear-box like the feeds below it, and the back-gear is moved to the front..
I have never seen one of these before, and I thought I was a Hendey-file.
 
There also appears to be a camelback drill press on the right side of the second picture... with it's base sunk in the ground.

An idea of what you would like to get for the Hendey, some information about how difficult it would be to get a trailer to it, and whether you have a method to load it would help build some interest...

I might be interested... I'm a few hundred miles away, but have been known to drive farther than that for the 'right deal'... but due to the amount of work involved to get it useable, the 'right deal' would be pretty low for me.

I do hope someone saves it, though.

-Bear
I can vouch for Bear. He drove from Georgia to upstate NY to buy my hendey 14 x 8 lathe and buffalo forge camel back drill press. He would be a fine steward for that machine.
 








 
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