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Hendey T&G

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Long time listener, first time caller.

I took ownership of a Hendey Tool and Gage Makers Lathe yesterday, SN 38246H1228

It was not under power, so I could not test the drive - I’m told it was running, but has been sitting unused for a few years. inspection showed this to be in great condition, some wear to the bed and a few worn gears in the thread/feed box along with a shredded up feed box pulley. Spindle shows no movement on my .0005” indicator. Some light surface rust here and there. Motor/drive is MG type made by Reliance - with one tube (GE 3C) on the generator side. All wiring looks present and in good condition, but electrics are not my forte..

Included: drawtube/mostly full set of 6h collets with wooden box, knockout rod, three and four jaw chucks (Union mfg) taper attachment (missing a couple pieces).

The TA is missing the sliding block (AHLQ 200) and extension binder handle stud and handle (AHLQ 213,214). Shot in the dark, but anyone have a lead on a possible replacement? Assuming making the sliding block would require either grinding or scraping to fit the swivel slide?

*Activates the Hendeyman signal* - hoping you can provide some info on this machine and some drawings for the TA parts.

I’ll upload some photos when I get a chance, thought I’d get the ball rolling here first.
 

hendeyman

Stainless
Joined
Nov 18, 2005
Location
elfrida arizona usa
hpwc:

I did receive your email, but I have been away from the shop for about a week helping the family of a friend who died in December.
Now that I am back, I have started searching for the information you requested. I will contact you tomorrow with what I have been
able to find.

Hendeyman
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Hendeyman - I’m sorry to hear about the loss of your friend. Thank you for the response but no rush on the info. The lathe has made it safely to my shop and I won’t be able to dig into this project for a few days anyhow.
 

wood2steel

Aluminum
Joined
May 17, 2013
Location
georgia
Congrats on your new acquisition. Hendey is definitely a premium machine. I believe those spindles were D1-4; I'll check my faceplate/dogplate collection this week to see if any are left. Good Luck
Johnny
 

browniesharp

Aluminum
Joined
Aug 23, 2004
Location
Somerville, NJ
My T&G did not come with a taper attachment;however, I was able to acquire a partial taper attachment from board member shapaholic. I believe 5 pieces were missing. One of which was the sliding block (cast iron)which I first milled to approximate dimensions and then surface ground. Earlier I had purchased the complete set of plans (24 as I recall) for the taper attachment from Hendeyman and fabricated the missing components.
 
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hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Today I wired up the lathe to test the drive system - the AC generator works no problem but I'm not getting anything from the DC motor. While I wait for the wiring diagram from Hendeyman, wonder if anyone has some insight on common problems with this drive system that I can begin diagnosing?
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
My T&G did not come with a taper attachment;however, I was able to acquire a partial taper attachment from board member shapaholic. I believe 5 pieces were missing. One of which was the sliding block (cast iron)which I first milled to approximate dimensions and then surface ground. Earlier I had purchased the complete set of plans (24 as I recall) for the taper attachment from Hendeyman and fabricated the missing components.

Thanks for the insight - I've reached out to shapaholic, it's a long shot but you miss every shot you don't take, so we'll see!
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Congrats on your new acquisition. Hendey is definitely a premium machine. I believe those spindles were D1-4; I'll check my faceplate/dogplate collection this week to see if any are left. Good Luck
Johnny


Thanks Johnny, that would be great - let me know if anything turns up.
 

Doozer

Titanium
Joined
Jul 23, 2001
Location
Buffalo NY
I will tell you the vacuum tube is a DC rectifier tube.
It has a mechanical clock timer that delays applying
current to the plates of the tube until the filament
warms up. I think mine take about 30 seconds. The tube
should glow purple when passing current.
This DC current is for the field of the generator. The
rheostat for speed control varies the current that is
applied to the field, which in turn controls the output
of the generator. This output is what controls speed
of the spindle motor. I know Monarch 10EE lathe with the
motor/generator used a separate belt driven DC generator
with a v belt for generator field current. Hendey uses the
rectifier tube. My Hendey is down for the moment.
I need a new coil for one of the forward/reverse contactors.
I have to post up a pic to see if anyone here has a spare
coil. Good luck with your lathe.

---Doozer
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
I will tell you the vacuum tube is a DC rectifier tube.
It has a mechanical clock timer that delays applying
current to the plates of the tube until the filament
warms up. I think mine take about 30 seconds. The tube
should glow purple when passing current.
This DC current is for the field of the generator. The
rheostat for speed control varies the current that is
applied to the field, which in turn controls the output
of the generator. This output is what controls speed
of the spindle motor. I know Monarch 10EE lathe with the
motor/generator used a separate belt driven DC generator
with a v belt for generator field current. Hendey uses the
rectifier tube. My Hendey is down for the moment.
I need a new coil for one of the forward/reverse contactors.
I have to post up a pic to see if anyone here has a spare
coil. Good luck with your lathe.

---Doozer

Thanks for that - I noticed the timer when I tried starting it, and noted the tube was glowing when the ac motor was running, then grew brighter when the timer reached contact at the end of its travel. Any idea what the switch above the timer with settings of ‘L N H’ does? It is currently at N, assuming the markings are low, neutral, high?
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Today, I spent a bit of time trying to track down any faults in the electrical when I realized I'd only blindly followed the wiring from the original cord into the breaker box so that the AC motor was spinning the wrong way (counterclockwise). There happens to be a brass plate on the motor with an engraved arrow pointing to the correct direction of rotation (clockwise from the tailstock end). After re-wiring, I turned it on to try again with no luck. So I went back to looking for anything that could shed some light on the issue, when I realized I hadn't tried the L N H switch mounted next to the rectifier tube. This time, I switched it to L, turned on and waited for the timer to finish it's travel and expecting no results I flipped the switch on the headstock and presto - it's running! Forward and reverse in all speeds work great.

RNI-Films-IMG-C99AC99C-1F0F-4C96-A445-16927713E5EA 2.jpg

What I failed to pay attention to (aside from the motor direction) was the plate above the tube which tells the correct setting to select corresponding to the actual line voltage (in my case, 208V). Looking at the chart, the tap switch should be set to L for 109-209V. It was set to N when I brought it in to my shop. I recall looking at the chart to confirm this was wired for 220, but did not pay attention to the tap switch side of the chart assuming the problem was in the wiring or components somewhere. Instead, it was staring me right in the face every time I looked at the motor side compartment.

RNI-Films-IMG-0ADF882F-8D06-40C4-A9C3-ABA6AA3E2AD3 2.jpgRNI-Films-IMG-C24C97FD-ABF8-4822-8488-C33D4FBE613B 2.jpg
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Today, I spent a bit of time trying to track down any faults in the electrical when I realized I'd only blindly followed the wiring from the original cord into the breaker box so that the AC motor was spinning the wrong way (counterclockwise). There happens to be a brass plate on the motor with an engraved arrow pointing to the correct direction of rotation (clockwise from the tailstock end). After re-wiring, I turned it on to try again with no luck. So I went back to looking for anything that could shed some light on the issue, when I realized I hadn't tried the L N H switch mounted next to the rectifier tube. This time, I switched it to L, turned on and waited for the timer to finish it's travel and expecting no results I flipped the switch on the headstock and presto - it's running! Since I can't post a video here, you'll have to settle for a photo with the spindle running at top speed and thus blurred a bit.

RNI-Films-IMG-C99AC99C-1F0F-4C96-A445-16927713E5EA 2.jpg

What I failed to pay attention to (aside from the motor direction) was the plate above the tube which tells the correct setting to select corresponding to the actual line voltage (in my case, 208V). Looking at the chart, the tap switch should be set to L for 109-209V. It was set to N when I brought it in to my shop.

RNI-Films-IMG-C24C97FD-ABF8-4822-8488-C33D4FBE613B 2.jpgRNI-Films-IMG-0ADF882F-8D06-40C4-A9C3-ABA6AA3E2AD3 2.jpg
 

hendeyman

Stainless
Joined
Nov 18, 2005
Location
elfrida arizona usa
hpwc:

The box in picture #2 shows the Reliance VS Exciter (C3 300 watts, 2.5 amperes). It receives input power from line #1 and line #3 that
feed the AC motor. The box is essentially a transformer with two primary windings, the end of each winding is connected to a three position switch marked L-N-H. As you have noted, these select the proper line voltage. There are two secondary windings, one large and
one small. The small one is for supplying the filament voltage and is center tapped to supply positive voltage for the generator and
motor. The large secondary is fused at each end and protects the plates of the gas filled rectifier tube C3. The secondary is center
tapped to supply the negative voltage for the motor and generator. The secondary is also tapped twice between the end taps and the
center tap to supply power for the Time Delay Relay when the transformer is energized. The exciter output feeds the Reversing drum
Switch and the generator and motor fields. These two fields are controlled by a ganged rheostat to control the spindle speed. The
white colored object on the right hand side of picture #5 is used to adjust the voltage controlling the generator field strength.

Hendeyman
 

hpwc

Plastic
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
I have been in contact with Hendeyman regarding the original purchase order, wiring diagrams, and parts drawings for the missing taper attachment parts. Today, the copies he made of the originals arrived.

The order was placed 10/11/1951 and shipped 09/26/1952, and the original purchase order reads:


Sold to:

The University of Chicago
5801 So. Ellis Avenue
Purchasing Department
Chicago 37, Illinois.

Ship to:

The University of Chicago
Chicago Midway Laboratories
5815 So. Kimbark Avenue
Chicago, Ill.

Wanted:
DO-X1
Air Forces

--

9"x24" Tool & Gage Makers' Lathe CR
GROUND BED - Oil Pan - Regular Equipment with Thread Chasing Dial
Ball Bearings on Main Spindle
Spindle Speeds - 40-2000 RPM
Cam Lock Type Flanged Spindle Nose
Thread Stop
Taper Attachment
Drawing in Attachment and set of 15 - #6 Collets from 1/8" to
1" inclusive by 16ths complete with cabinet
Furnish & Fit 6" 4-jaw steel body Independent chuck
Furnish & Fit 5" 3-jaw steel body Universal chuck
Follow Rest, Bronze Jaws
Female Center
1 - Set of gears for cutting metric threads from 0.1 M/M to
15 M/M including about 45 international metric pitches
Furnish & Fit Motor Generator Motor Drive for 220 volt -
3 phase - 60 cycle with all necessary controls

Fit leveling screws
Chrome plate hand wheels, handles and levers



The only parts that were not included (aside from the missing TA parts) are the metric gears and follow rest.


Chicago Midway Laboratories connects the dots to the brass tag stamped "CML" and "U.S.A.F." on the tailstock end.

IMG_3164.jpg

Some research into CML came up with references to U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, high-altitude radioisotope sampling, and electron intensifying. I'd venture to guess this lathe has seen some interesting use in it's day. At some point, it was decommissioned from CML to another department at U of C where it was used for a while then let to set for several years along with a few other machines.
 








 
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