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How to cut/grind new sub-spindle chuck jaws

tome9999

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
I bought new chuck jaws for a 3-jaw chuck in a lathe with a main and sub-spindle. These are hardened chuck jaws for the sub-spindle. After installing them and lining them up for a work piece I noticed that the workpiece was not running true. There is a slight but visible wobble. The workpiece I used happened to be turned down on the main spindle. So, I guess the new jaws need to be trued up in relation to the main spindle? I have seen videos on grinding jaws with tool post grinders etc. but wondering what people typically do on a two spindle machine? Is there some way to put a grinding wheel on (very!) straight shank into the main and grind the jaws in the sub...? Or can they be hard turned with a boring bar?
-Tom
 

Scruffy887

Titanium
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Location
Se Ma USA
I bought new chuck jaws for a 3-jaw chuck in a lathe with a main and sub-spindle. These are hardened chuck jaws for the sub-spindle. After installing them and lining them up for a work piece I noticed that the workpiece was not running true. There is a slight but visible wobble. The workpiece I used happened to be turned down on the main spindle. So, I guess the new jaws need to be trued up in relation to the main spindle? I have seen videos on grinding jaws with tool post grinders etc. but wondering what people typically do on a two spindle machine? Is there some way to put a grinding wheel on (very!) straight shank into the main and grind the jaws in the sub...? Or can they be hard turned with a boring bar?
-Tom

I have always turned soft jaws for Main and Sub spindle. Some day may buy hard jaws for the Main spindle. Someday. May send back if they wobble. I think hard jaws for the main spindle are for very low volume or
"one of" parts. If transferring to the sub spindle you are not looking at "one of" parts. Bore the jaws and at some point you will have a library assortment of good jaws.
 

tome9999

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
Or kluge a die grinder so that it's mounted to the carriage, take light cuts with a good wheel.

That made me realize I can put a grinding wheel on an arbor into a live tool holder facing the sub-spindle and grind it that way.
Thanks,
-Tom
 

13engines

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Location
Saint Paul
If you insist on using hard jaws in the sub, just use a stout boring bar and take a dust cut on the clamping surfaces.


Like this person said. Just use a carbide or carbide tipped boring bar. Even insert drills make a good boring bar.

People drill out taps all the time using carbide, so why not hard jaws. There is no need for a grinder.
 

Orange Vise

Stainless
Joined
Feb 10, 2012
Location
California
Standard carbide will not last cutting case-hardened chuck jaws.

But in an application like this, where you're just truing up one set of jaws, they don't need to last.

Expect the first edge to be toast roughing out the high spots, and the second edge should make it through the finish cut.
 

tome9999

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
I ended up using a stout boring bar and carbide insert. Worked great and didn’t seem to mind the hardened jaws in the least. Thanks for the suggestions.
-Tom
 








 
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