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I.C. Engine Main Bearing Housing Bores?

GregSY

Diamond
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Location
Houston
Thought it said BMW....I have short wick when it comes to the tight-ass Germans and their parts/information supply.
 

AlfaGTA

Diamond
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Location
Benicia California USA
Would like to thank all that took the time to respond.
I like the idea of using a CMM to chart the shell , think that might have merit. (thanks Milland)
No CMM here but have a good relationship with Jim Dour (MegaCycle Cams) who is just up the road...will run the idea past him.

Failing that i will resort to making a test housing as i have done in the past.....Can make it for the standard shells, verify a size then open it up to do the oversize shells.

Again, thanks for all the responses, and kind words....
Cheers Ross
 

TGTool

Titanium
Joined
Sep 22, 2006
Location
Stillwater, Oklahoma
They did harvest points internationally, does that count?

British Racing Motors - Wikipedia

Here's an earlier engine of theirs, the quixotic H16:

1966 BRM P83 F1 Car Sound Warming Up Its 3.0L 16-Cylinder, H-Layout Engine! - YouTube

That was an interesting view. I remember the H16 from back in the 60's but online videos were far in the future and I never attended an actual race.

The thing that immediately struck me was the unexpected sound. I was anticipating something like a V-12 only with more cylinders, but it has the lumpy sound of a V-8. I was more interested in the engineering and design aspects and recall that it was unreliable, one problem being the beating that the gears linking the crankshafts took. Now that I've heard it run, the vibration problems are less surprising.
 
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slowmotion

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 31, 2013
Location
Danville Virginia
Wow,
Looking at the pictures some people get to work on the neatest stuff.
My job is to make TPG-322s.
OTOH if I scrap one it is a dollar or two lost. If you scrap one of these?
Bob

Not that these blocks that I work on are as exotic as a BRM, but I pucker when doing a few different operations on them, including this video. It's mostly the cost factor, billets in the neighborhood of $10K each.

Installing sleeves in Crest Subaru billet block with liquid nitrogen - YouTube
 

eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
Wow,
Looking at the pictures some people get to work on the neatest stuff.
My job is to make TPG-322s.
OTOH if I scrap one it is a dollar or two lost. If you scrap one of these?
Bob

Weld it back up and remachine it. So the cost of the many hours of labor. If the entire block got grenaded I'd guess it would be pretty much irreplaceable. So, priceless?
 

thermite

Diamond
+1 on the pics, is someone restoring a vintage race car?

Nah. The BRM was built to tow holiday campers up to the Lake District in style..

... or was it to boost Tony Vandervell's already enormous ego?

The latter. more likely....

:)

Ross? The designer didn't know anything novel that you and your associates do not also know. Perhaps he knew LESS? Sr.s Lampredi & Columbo surely did their fair share of dumb s**t. So too, the otherwise magical Leo Goosens, NOVI special that could reliably take the pole.. but struggle for the reliability to ever FINISH a race.

Maserati, the Elder, was far less error-prone in his day.

So, too Ing. Romeo, with an engine even the brutal-on-cars "Nivola" couldn't hammer clear to tired scrap metal before whupping-ass on a whole lab full of too-tonic ingineers? Straight-eight crank is too long? Do it as two fours in tandem. End of spaghetti-whip problem.

And remember the "OSCA" four at Le Mans?

Treat this puppy as an original design challenge. Do as you see fit.
It will work as well as such things ever work.

It DID, after all, arrive at your doorstep with more than just the ONE record of prior failure, did it not?
 

BillE

Hot Rolled
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
Location
Sydney Au

For a garden variety DFV/DFX, minimum order was a 100 bearing sets quite recently. If you were related to Methuselah, you might be able to get rid of them to BRM enthusiasts in a lifetime or two.

I'd wonder if Doug Nye was the recipient of any of that info after 30+ years of work on the books and close contact with Rudd?
 

Homeshopblob

Plastic
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
I've wondered for years how bearing shells are inspected for length and crush during manufacture. They've been made since the the 1920s (I think) so there must be a low tech way of doing it. I've read that the halves are made flat then formed to shape, but can't verify that. The shells I often see don't show any signs of being sized on the ends which would tend to validate that. That does not explaine thrust bearings shells. I've worked on 30s engines with floating rod bearings where the installer sizes the arc of the bearing before installation, but that's a lot less demanding than the crush of a non-floating bearing

Your making a test hosing is all I could ever think of. If you figure it out, please share!

Hail Mary dept - There are engines that used babbitted shells, babbit poured onto steel shell halves and installed from new. If the engine isn't going to be used in anger, perhaps that would at least make it run?
 








 
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