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I may have invented a new 5 axis fixture

dandrummerman21

Stainless
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Location
MI, USA
If you had never seen one before. Theorized it, built it, and it worked great. All while never knowing it existed. I say from a mental challange that’s a HUGE win! You thought outside of what you.know and came up with a good product.
Keep doing it.
Inventors invent things that already exist all the time. But they keep doing it. Sometimes the most innovative things come from working in a vacuum !!!

Even better than all that, he shared it with US!

Now we can all copy his idea and be local geniuses, whenever its use could present itself.

Seriously, I've got a couple parts in mind for this type of workholding. I've never thought of it before.

I'd do the exact same idea except I'll probably mount it in a 5c 4th indexer (no 5th required)

Edit: mine also won't look as good, but will at least function okay.
 
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implmex

Diamond
Joined
Jun 23, 2002
Location
Vancouver BC Canada
Hi dandrummerman21:
I figure this is all fair game for others to use if it will make their lives a bit easier...it's hard enough to do this for a living without helping each other out where we can.
I've certainly benefited hugely from all that I have been able to learn on PM, so a big shoutout to Milacron for taking the trouble to set it up so many years ago!

Moving on to a specific comment of yours.
This one:
"I'd do the exact same idea except I'll probably mount it in a 5c 4th indexer (no 5th required)"

This is really a fourth axis fixture anyway...there's not much point in trying to make a 5 axis part when 4 sides of the stock is covered with the gadget, so I expect it to work just as well on a fourth as it does on the TRT100.
The only thing to be wary of...if you don't bolt it directly against the platter, you probably shouldn't do off-axis drilling with it...I fear you might spin the fixture in the collet if you try to pound in a 1/2" drill, 1 1/2" off axis in titanium at some crazy feedrate.
So get comfortable with helical interpolating all your bigger off axis holes and all should be good!

On another note...all those who offered those kind words about how an invention that turns out to already be previously invented etc etc etc...I greatly appreciate those kind words.
I'm happy it's working out for the customer...I encourage all those who think it may be useful to make one too, and maybe I'll even give Haas a nudge and tell them they need to start thinking about creative workholding solutions for these tiny beasts, because I sure didn't find much when I looked on the Internet.
I was deflated only for a short moment when it was pointed out to me that there really truly is very little that's new under the sun, and this certainly wasn't one of those new things.

BTW, it LOOKS a lot more sophisticated then it actually is...it's just a cylinder with the sides lopped off at a 4 degree angle and a big blending radius and with the insides cored out so a cutter can get in there.
The rest is a few chamfers...ultimately pretty easy to mill even on a 3 axis piddler like my Minimill.
It took about 10 hours to make...that's with a 0.400" Axial DOC and a 0.010" Radial DOC at 80IPM and 4000RPM for the roughing and 5000 RPM with a 0.002" chipload and 0.005" stepover for finishing.
The cutter was a 1/2" Garr 4 flute TiAlN coated with a 0.020 corner rad hanging way out of the collet, and it did the roughing and the finishing .
It's bolted onto a scrap aluminum block that's been trammed to be dead nuts co-planar to the Y-Z plane (within 0.0003" in 4")
Here's a link:

So I didn't strain myself or the machine to make time on it...I just let it nibble away in the background while the lathe and the wire EDM were making the days' money.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
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dandrummerman21

Stainless
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Location
MI, USA
The only thing to be wary of...if you don't bolt it directly against the platter, you probably shouldn't do off-axis drilling with it...I fear you might spin the fixture in the collet if you try to pound in a 1/2" drill, 1 1/2" off axis in titanium at some crazy feedrate.
So get comfortable with helical interpolating all your bigger off axis holes and all should be good!

So IDK if many people are aware of these, but hardinge sells (for a huge amount of money for what it is) a "stop plate" that goes over the nose of the collet and contacts the nose of the spindle, that allows you to bump the shoulder of a fixture against it.

This allows a setup to be "dead length" if holding on a smaller diameter with a shoulder.

Here is a link.


If it isn't super clear, here is a picture of a couple bored out to a little over 5/8" and 1":


20230814_164316.jpg



So if i made a fixture for 3 inch slugs, it would be a 1" diameter arbor, with a shoulder that makes firm contact with this.

this makes the 5c way more rigid. I mean way way more rigid. I wouldn't be worried about drilling off center with this setup.



Alternatively, the 5c indexer I have in mind has a bolt pattern for a small 3 jaw chuck that I could make a fixture for. And yet another indexer has the threaded hardinge nose on it. (both indexers are yuasa)


Here's a blurry picture of a fixture in a collet with the work stop.

1692046222235.png
 

Donkey Hotey

Stainless
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
If you had never seen one before. Theorized it, built it, and it worked great. All while never knowing it existed. I say from a mental challange that’s a HUGE win! You thought outside of what you.know and came up with a good product.
Keep doing it.
Inventors invent things that already exist all the time. But they keep doing it. Sometimes the most innovative things come from working in a vacuum !!!
A friend who literally has a stack of patents and far more trade secrets always pushed: Inventors are the worst judge of what is actually an invention. They take for granted that something they felt was obvious, isn't obvious to everyone. "Did you know this yesterday? Did you know this before you went to lunch? Okay, it's new and innovative so it's an invention." Is it worth patenting is a different question.
 








 
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