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I need unslotted jointer plane iron and do you know what brand plane this is?

guythatbrews

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Location
MO, USA
I bought this jointer plane for $25 at a garage sale. I has no iron but I figured no big deal.

So far I can't find an iron. It's 2.25" wide and can't have a slot in it. If I can't find one I can use a slotted blade and make a button to put under the cap screw but I don't want to do that. I can't even find a wider solid iron to modify. Seems to be a number of the grooving type blades correct width with no slot but no flat irons. It's a pretty nice piece and I'd sure like to get the correct iron.

No brand markings on this thing. There is a # 8 on the frog and a small #7 on the cap and a #8 visible behind the chip breaker. The chip breaker is riveted to the cap and as you can see there is no cap lever just a nicely knurled thubscrew. Nice plating on the cap. Blued it up and it's amazingly flat and maybe useable as is. A .003 feeler gage won't go anywhere.

The knob appears to be wood painted black. The handle is a very nice bakelite piece with great checkering. It looks like a gunstock.

I think this ia a top of the line plane. Nothing to be ashamed of beats me why the mfg didn't put their name on it.

Anybody have any ideas and thanks!

.20220413_093013.jpg20220413_093036.jpg20220413_093109.jpg20220413_093134.jpg20220413_093142.jpg
 

guythatbrews

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Location
MO, USA
Hoch will make you a custom one and it will be the best blade you've ever used.
Bench Plane Blades and Breakers

I tried your suggestion and Hoch no longer does custom they referred me to Daed Tool Works. I will see what they come up with.

I looked all thru the bay on hand planes and there is a bunch there. If I woulda omitted japanese from the search it would have been a lot quicker. Just looking at the pics i only saw one setup like mine, and I will bet it is the same maker whoever that is. Just the cap, blade, frog and adj lever. I've asked the seller for the iron dimensions maybe I will get lucky.

And I might just make one. A piece of O1 flat is about $40 and I'd just torch harden and temper the business end.
 

Conrad Hoffman

Titanium
Joined
May 10, 2009
Location
Canandaigua, NY, USA
Well, it would be nice if Hoch updated their web site to say that! Hard to believe a small piece of O1 costs that much, but here we are. We may have to go back to the old ways and hammer weld a piece of good steel to a piece of cheap steel!
 
Not a jointer, kind of a long jack or a narrow foreplane. :)

Chaplins Patent "manufactured by" Tower and Lyon.
The actual manufacturer was Iver Johnson in Worcester, MA.

The basic 1872 patent was by Orril R Chaplin.
Tower and Lyon were a large hardware jobber in NYC and listed as "manufacturers" of quite a few products, including RR equipment, locks, and ice skates to give an idea of the range.
In 1876 a patent was issued to John Tower for the dovetail design to attach the handle.
In 1888, a patent was issued to Iver Johnson & Reinhard Torkelson for adjustable throat and rubber handle.
(Iver Johnson had initiated use of the rubber grips on his pistols. As you noticed 125 years or so later, they were quite durable for plane totes as well).

There were quite a few iterations and some cross interpolation of planes that came out of Iver Johnson's factories in Worcester and Fitchburg. Similar planes were branded with the Champion name (as per I-J shotguns) He also made Tower and Lyon's weird Challenge planes.

Patents on various parts continued into the early 1900's. Patents for "Chaplin's improved patent" models start around 1899. AFAICT, this is when the lateral lever was added, and the slotted iron. If this is correct, your plane is from before 1900.

I have 2 block planes on the shelves in my office, and bench plane about the size of yours that i could not find this evening. It is in much worse shape, can't recall if it has an iron.

Always wanted to find one of the adjustable throat models. They made several versions.

(Ignoring my opinions :) ), most of the factual data above is from PTAMPIA 1 & 2 by Roger K Smith.

smt
 
Last edited:

rons

Diamond
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Location
California, USA
You can get a slightly over-sized blade and trim it down.

I bought a few plane kits from St. James Bay Tool Co. Those blades were 1/4" thick.
 

guythatbrews

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Location
MO, USA
You can get a slightly over-sized blade and trim it down.

I bought a few plane kits from St. James Bay Tool Co. Those blades were 1/4" thick.
Thanks for the idea but I've already got a piece of O-1 ground flat stock and I'm gonna make one.

BTW the guy that Hoch referred me to for custom irons never contacted me.
Not a jointer, kind of a long jack or a narrow foreplane. :)

Chaplins Patent "manufactured by" Tower and Lyon.
The actual manufacturer was Iver Johnson in Worcester, MA.

The basic 1872 patent was by Orril R Chaplin.
Tower and Lyon were a large hardware jobber in NYC and listed as "manufacturers" of quite a few products, including RR equipment, locks, and ice skates to give an idea of the range.
In 1876 a patent was issued to John Tower for the dovetail design to attach the handle.
In 1888, a patent was issued to Iver Johnson & Reinhard Torkelson for adjustable throat and rubber handle.
(Iver Johnson had initiated use of the rubber grips on his pistols. As you noticed 125 years or so later, they were quite durable for plane totes as well).

There were quite a few iterations and some cross interpolation of planes that came out of Iver Johnson's factories in Worcester and Fitchburg. Similar planes were branded with the Champion name (as per I-J shotguns) He also made Tower and Lyon's weird Challenge planes.

Patents on various parts continued into the early 1900's. Patents for "Chaplin's improved patent" models start around 1899. AFAICT, this is when the lateral lever was added, and the slotted iron. If this is correct, your plane is from before 1900.

I have 2 block planes on the shelves in my office, and bench plane about the size of yours that i could not find this evening. It is in much worse shape, can't recall if it has an iron.

Always wanted to find one of the adjustable throat models. They made several versions.

(Ignoring my opinions :) ), most of the factual data above is from PTAMPIA 1 & 2 by Roger K Smith.

smt
Thanks for the info Stephen. Somehow I just saw this. Using your info found a similar not identical plane on ebay.

So likely made around 1900. That is nice to know. Had no idea. And the hard rubber handle is perfect. The entire thing is in very good condition.

Can you explain why it is not considered a jointer plane? It is shorter than the ebay item by a 4 inches or so.
 
You can get a slightly over-sized blade and trim it down.

I bought a few plane kits from St. James Bay Tool Co. Those blades were 1/4" thick.

Yabbutt - he needs an iron probably under .10" thick to fit through the throat.

Can you explain why it is not considered a jointer plane? It is shorter than the ebay item by a 4 inches or so.

It's pretty loose nomenclature, but a jack is around 14 - 15" long, a foreplane somewhere between 15" to maybe 20" long. E.g. Stanley #6 at 18". Jointer planes start around 20" (Auburn metallic) or 22" (Stanley #7) and go on up past 24" (Stanley #8) or even longer. Some of the transitionals are 30 or 32" long. Most jointers have at least 2-3/8" wide irons, the Stanley #8 is 2-5/8" IIRC (not in shop at moment)

It is interesting that the top of the frog on your swivels, but there is no lever.
Mine is lever style. I found it on a shelf yesterday looking for (air)plane parts in the loft, and didn't study closer because i figured you were gone.

smt
 








 
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