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Identification of new LeBlond

Dr. Hillbilly

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Location
Oregonia, Ohio
The modern syntax of LeBlond serial numbers is number-letters-number.
My new lathe is just 812. The folks at LeBlond Ltd. could not do anything with it.

Can anyone reference a 3-digit serial number?

The 1911 catalog shows a very similar lathe on pages 34 and 35 (21" on 8' bed)
page 34.JPG
Mine is presumably older as it has the 2-position feed lever rather than the 4-position lever in 1911, and symmetrical ways rather than the LeBlond classic 70/20 ways which came later, and the legs are at the extremities rather than inset.

Particularly cool is the Double-Back-Gear
1911 double back gear.JPG
John Oder shared info on the Greaves-Klusman version of this a few years ago.
GK dbg.jpg
They were both built in Cincinnati. Does anyone know who copied who?

I bought the lathe from the shop which purchased it new. They were a loyal LeBlond customer. They had a long-bed version of the same lathe which I missed, and they have a beautiful LeBlond #3 Heavy which they refuse to part with. It has an offset overarm support which I had not seen before
IMG_9451.jpg

Anyway, I had a 14" LeBlond and a 28", so this fills the void between them. I have the No1, No2, and No3 cutter grinders, so now I just need the larger and smaller mills to complement my 2-1/2 Heavy Universal!
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
There were two flavors - Heavy Duty (70 / 20 front way) and the other having symetrical ways

1911 refers to these after it shows you all the HD and specials

These were the "Regular" lathes - both standard and quick change

They were made to 24"

About the serial I can guess that it isn't as old as the "lot" numbered lathes

Here is a 1911 20 Regular Quick Change

20 Regular QC.jpg
Note the twin screw lantern style tool post
 
Last edited:

Peter S

Diamond
Joined
May 6, 2002
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
The modern syntax of LeBlond serial numbers is number-letters-number.
My new lathe is just 812. The folks at LeBlond Ltd. could not do anything with it.

Can anyone reference a 3-digit serial number?

The 1911 catalog shows a very similar lathe on pages 34 and 35 (21" on 8' bed)
View attachment 336488
Mine is presumably older as it has the 2-position feed lever rather than the 4-position lever in 1911, and symmetrical ways rather than the LeBlond classic 70/20 ways which came later, and the legs are at the extremities rather than inset.

Particularly cool is the Double-Back-Gear
View attachment 336489
John Oder shared info on the Greaves-Klusman version of this a few years ago.
View attachment 336490
They were both built in Cincinnati. Does anyone know who copied who?

I bought the lathe from the shop which purchased it new. They were a loyal LeBlond customer. They had a long-bed version of the same lathe which I missed, and they have a beautiful LeBlond #3 Heavy which they refuse to part with. It has an offset overarm support which I had not seen before
View attachment 336491

Anyway, I had a 14" LeBlond and a 28", so this fills the void between them. I have the No1, No2, and No3 cutter grinders, so now I just need the larger and smaller mills to complement my 2-1/2 Heavy Universal!

Dr Hillbilly,

It sounds like you have an expanding Leblond collection :)

I am intrigued by your last photo - is that a milling machine with its horizontal arbor off-set and driven by silent chain? If so, why?

IMG_9451.jpg

Regarding the "double friction backgear" on the lathe, does that mean you can change between the two backgear ratios without stopping the drive? If so, I am guessing the two larger gears are in constant mesh with their driving gears but separate and free-turning on the back gear shaft unless the selector locks them to said shaft via friction cones or something similar?
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
Regarding the "double friction backgear" on the lathe, does that mean you can change between the two backgear ratios without stopping the drive?

Big lever on front works clutch that selects one or the other on the fly

Essentially same as in this 24" Greaves Klusman photo.

P1000347sm.jpg

Too bad it can't select back gears in or out:D
 

Dr. Hillbilly

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Location
Oregonia, Ohio
I am intrigued by your last photo - is that a milling machine with its horizontal arbor off-set and driven by silent chain? If so, why?

Peter, that was my question also!
The off-set arbor is supported by nice quality castings. It looks OEM and definitely not shop-built. However I do not see it in any of the old catalogs. My only thought is that the work may be very long but with milling offset on one end, beyond normal machine stroke. This image better shows the stack of radius cutters on the arbor. The shop built drills for drilling into coal deposits as well as the explosives to be dropped into the holes.IMG_9458.jpg
 

Dr. Hillbilly

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Location
Oregonia, Ohio
You are correct John. They will not sell me the heavy-duty or the No3 Heavy mill.
The shop is being converted into high-end condos with a vintage-tech theme. The heavy's will never be run, but were considered more attractive for the lobby!
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
You are correct John. They will not sell me the heavy-duty or the No3 Heavy mill.
The shop is being converted into high-end condos with a vintage-tech theme. The heavy's will never be run, but were considered more attractive for the lobby!


As you get in to this you can tell from spindle bearing construction whether it is nearer 1911 or nearer mid twenties. 1911 had the chilled cast iron of the head stock as a front bearing and Babbitt as rear. Nearer mid twenties both bearings were replaceable Bronze - with thin Babbitt overlay
 

Dr. Hillbilly

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Location
Oregonia, Ohio
As you get in to this you can tell from spindle bearing construction whether it is nearer 1911 or nearer mid twenties. 1911 had the chilled cast iron of the head stock as a front bearing and Babbitt as rear. Nearer mid twenties both bearings were replaceable Bronze - with thin Babbitt overlay

I assumed mine was early as the feed-box uses the telescoping gear (2-positions) and the lever (two positions) rather than the 4-position selector.

The front spindle bearing now has a grease zerk, but I assume that to be a modern retrofit. any reason not to return to the drip lube?
 

johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
The front spindle bearing now has a grease zerk, but I assume that to be a modern retrofit. any reason not to return to the drip
lube?

Zerks are for folks that think their precise machine tool spindle is somehow related to the needs of a wheelbarrow

By all means get back to oil - light oil in closest fit that does not heat on you
 








 
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