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inherited south bend lathe - clueless

mtup28

Plastic
Joined
May 9, 2022
Hi thanks in advance for any help. My father in his later years got big into metal work. After he passed we sold off most of his items. I however kept his big metal lathe as he had torn it down and restored it back to being fully functional. After a decade of keeping it in my shed I've come to the realization that metal work has no interest to me(woodworker instead) and I would rather see it be used and appreciated by someone then taking up space and collecting dust.

That being said, unlike woodworking tools, I have no idea what I have or what the value is, or even how to use it. All I know is that its a South Bend lathe, I believe my dad said it was from the 1920', for some reason 1926 sticks in my head but I could be way off. My understanding also is that the only thing he replaced on it with modern equipment is the power cord and and what looks like the power switch. I took basic photos of what I have, I have no idea where the serial number would be located on it. But if anyone has any input in regards to what it is and what the approximate value would be I'd appreciate it. I am able to get other photos but figured I'd wait and see what you guys felt were needed for additional photos and where things might be located on it for identification/valuation. I also have a large assortment of mounting plates and jigs for it that I'm not sure if they are original or aftermarket.
 

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mtup28

Plastic
Joined
May 9, 2022
after posting this I had a hunch and searched the members and found my dads old account and was able to get the year, its a 1929 south bend. Still no idea where to start with a value.thumbnail5.jpg
 

mtup28

Plastic
Joined
May 9, 2022
these are what I have for attachments plus a few wrenches for them
 

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Riderusty

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jan 19, 2002
Location
Sea Cliff, NY & Portland, OR USA
That looks like a nice clean lathe. Eleven inch swing is a nice size for a home shop. You've also got a nice amount of tooling and attachments including a taper attachment which although a bit rusty usually sells for quite a bit when offered separately. Try posting this on the South Bend Forum here--that should be quite helpful. There is no easy answer for what an old machine tool is worth--brand, condition, geographic location, included tooling are all factors.


Tom B.
 

RCPDesigns

Hot Rolled
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Location
Atlanta GA.
You might try to find a place in your woodworking shop for it and use it. Even if you only use it a couple times a year it will provide a critical capability. I'll give you an example from just the other day. I needed an arbor adapter with a back on it. The junk sold today is plastic, not very custom and take day or two to be delivered. I turned one out of mild steel in an hour and continued on with the other project I was working on. Learn the basics of using the machine and you'll find plenty of things you need it for. Said another way... until you understand all the things it can do you don't really realize you need it.
 

ramsay1

Stainless
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Location
port allen, louisiana usa
You have quite a bit more with your lathe than came with my 1941 LeBlond... I had to make every back plate for every chuck that goes on my machine.... Your lathe looks somewhat similar to the lathe used by "Carbine Williams".... Cheers from Louisiana Ramsay 1:)
 

dalmatiangirl61

Titanium
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
As mentioned above, if you learn how to use it, you will most likely realize you should keep it, CAUTION, it might lead to more machines:D.

As for value, in the current market, in my area, I'd be shooting for 3K. It is a good homeshop size, has qcgb, taper attachment, 2 chucks, 3 faceplates. Downside is no tool holders (even thought there is a tool post), and no centers or chucks for the tailstock, these are things that you, or any buyer will need in order to put it to work.

Do a search for "How to run a lathe", it is an old Southbend publication, read it, and you just might decide to keep it.
 

L Vanice

Diamond
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Fort Wayne, IN

Tom A

Cast Iron
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Location
NW Florida
That's a nice, working, machine, and you already own it.
I agree with some of the other posters - Unless you really need the money, if you sell it, I think you'll regret it some day.
 

Pathogen

Hot Rolled
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
There are lots of people if you look for them that would love this lathe like your Father did

Advertise it for $800 and find the person that has a dream to own one and give it to them for free
 

jmm03

Hot Rolled
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Location
ventura,ca.usa
I guess I am overly sentimental, but I wish I had a lathe passed down by my father... I personally think you might be well to learn how to use it, you must already have some skills woodworking wise, this would just add to your toolbox. Jim
 

wdTom

Aluminum
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Location
Rhode Island
I agree with the keep it folks. Please don't take offence at this. Don't be afraid to oil it. Too much oil is way better than not enough. There in nothing on the lathe oil will hurt except the belts and motor. I have noticed a lot of wood working folks seem allergic to grease and oil and their stuff that needs it is dry or in need of oil or grease. As you do wood work the dust will dry out the oil on the ways that keep it from rusting. I would cover it with something to keep some of the dust off and wipe and re oil before each use.
 








 
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