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Installing the Laser Tool Presetter

Milling man

Hot Rolled
Joined
Aug 6, 2021
Location
Moscow, Russia
Dear moderators, if I made a mistake in the section, please move this topic to the most appropriate place. It seemed to me that there are most people here who might be interested in this.
Hello dear colleagues!
For the last 2-3 months I have been slowly installing a laser tool gauge on our horizontal milling center Mazak FF-660. I thought that many people would like to put such a thing on a car, but, like me once, when they think of the word "laser", they think of something unrealistically complicated. I hope my story will dispel some doubts.
And so, a brief background. We bought a used horizontal machining center with a spindle speed of 15,000 rpm and an automatic pallet changer for only 25,000 euros! I consider it almost a gift, considering that it was in full working order. Of course, then many "nuances" were discovered - the lack of documentation (we never received it in full), a coolant pump through the spindle, a rotary union for supplying coolant through the spindle, etc. But the biggest problem was that there were no probes on the machine - no probe in the spindle, no tool presetter.
And if we need a spindle probe almost exclusively for the convenience of work, then a tool setter is a guarantee that the operator will not be processing 10 copper billets at a cost of $ 100 each with a broken cutter at night. This has already happened on our vertical machine, and I strictly ordered the technologists to mandatory check all tools with a diameter of <4mm before the tool enters the tool magazine. Therefore, the instrument presetter is a very important thing for us.
After I fixed all the main components on the machine and installed all the parts that were missing on this machine, it was the turn of the adjuster.

I thought for a long time which presetter to put in the car. I worked very little with laser presetters about 8 years ago and then they were installed from the factory. Therefore, at first I looked towards contact presetters and even bought a Renishaw TS27R. But no matter how I put it inside the machine cabinet, I understood that either the spindle or the machine table would knock it down when turning the 4th axis. For a while I thought about a presetter that would go into the working area of the machine to measure the tool, and then come back, something like in this picture:
6288703.1633782608__.jpg

And at some point I decided - damn it, but the laser will solve all my problems! The emitter and receiver are located outside the movement zone of the spindle or machine table. The laser will allow you to measure small diameter tools. And the laser will allow you to measure a diamond tool, which is very undesirable to measure by the contact method. In general, I decided that I would overcome my inner fear and decide to install a laser.
I bought a used BLOOM on ebay beforehand. It only costs about 850 euros.

In order to fix the laser emitter and receiver, I needed to make some kind of frame that would hold them. In fact, if everything is done as it should be, there should be intermediate adjustment platforms between the frame and the laser modules in order to set the laser tilt in 3 planes, and set the laser beam to coincide with the machine axes. But these regulators are quite difficult to manufacture, and the welded frame still needs to be quite rigid so as not to vibrate after fast movements. And this frame must be stable over time, not change its shape in any way. So I decided to just process the base pads on the frame with good accuracy, set the laser modules on them so that the laser beam hits the receiver, and then align the entire frame relative to the axes of the machine.

This is how the setter should look inside the car on the 3d model:
941920107_MazakFF-660.JPG.88bc4925031bf7a6764e3c04956eb04c.jpg

The blue dotted line is the laser beam :)

The welded frame looks like this:
2050391101_BLUM.JPG.1a7d634995adbc5bba803218d2e58482.jpg

Laser modules will be attached to the blue areas, so they must be strictly parallel to each other and to the mounting plane on the part with many holes.
I was able to weld the frame myself, with welding something thick I have no problem when you can put the maximum current that the welder has :) The bottom plate with holes is 30mm (1.18 inches) thick, the square pipes are 50x50x5mm (1.97x1.97x0.197 inches). After welding, I had to look for a furnace where all this structure would fit for annealing - the frame length is about 1.100mm (a little over 43 inches).

After annealing, it was time to grind the base pads. Here's what it looked like on a surface grinder:
IMG_20220516_163551.jpg

Despite the wall thickness of a square pipe with half a finger, it turned out to be surprisingly flexible! Therefore, I ground with a very small depth, 10 microns per pass in roughing and 1 micron in finishing passes. In the end, everything worked out.
After that, it's time to install the base plate on the bed, to which the welded frame will be screwed. Here's what she looked like:
IMG_20220606_172646.jpg

Black M10x1 threaded screws push the plate away from the bed, light M12 screws pull the plate to the bed. M10x1 screws rest against the frame for a reason, but through balls to compensate for deviations of the screw axes:
IMG_20220616_181538.jpg
IMG_20220616_181644.jpg

The base plate was set relative to the machine axes with an accuracy of 5 microns (0.0002 inches). After that, I installed a welded frame and screwed a laser emitter to it, just to please myself:
IMG_20220607_171456.jpg

Then - the tedious work of pulling wires and pneumatic tubes:
IMG_20220608_172358.jpg

In the end, now it all looks like this:
IMG_20220615_144451.jpg

The installation is almost finished, next will be the connection of all this to the CNC. A kind person sent me BLOOM measuring cycles (and a ladder from the machine where they were used) for free, and I was very surprised at the logic of their work. Ladder doesn't process signals at all, just passes them from the macro, through the #10xx variables to the Y outputs. And passes the signals from the X inputs, through the variables, to the macro program. A very unusual solution, in my opinion, but it makes life much easier - you only need to write 10-20 lines in the ladder!

I hope my story will help someone decide to install such a thing on their machine :) I, of course, will describe the next steps.
 
I will describe an important feature of laser setters that I did not know about.
I was sure that the laser beam was collimated, that is, straight. But it turned out that this is not entirely true :) There are versions with a collimated laser. But there are also versions with a beam focused in a specific place - usually in the middle between the emitter and receiver. And most often, versions with a focused laser are used on combined systems - where the emitter and receiver are installed on a common basis. I had it's one, and the laser turned out to be focused. Here is a good picture from MAPROSS:
2022-07-11_19-53-13.png.3a9fe91fd40d822ec096a5ecd60dcebd.png
And so, the distance between the transmitter and the receiver was about 140mm (5.5 inches), and became about 1.000mm (40 inches). And the diameter of the spot from the laser beam on the receiver was about an inch)))))
To say that I was upset is to say nothing..... In sadness, I went home.
I didn't study optics very well during my physics lessons at school, and after school I had almost no tasks related to optics. In general, optics is not my forte :) But I knew something. I have an enlarger objectiv that I used for a homemade "microscope", here is a thread about it:

I tried to reduce the diameter of the laser beam by directing the laser beam through a objectiv held by my hands. And, thank Odin, the receiver flashed its LEDs!
First of all, I disassembled the emitter and examined its optical design. Here's what it looks like from the inside:
DSC_8602.JPG.402d52da780f1c9490c3175d0ab42e06.jpgDSC_8605.JPG.f91d802b7ff9ed0b823e584665340ab1.jpgDSC_8608.JPG.43db5793bd16ed443b38aa84329e887c.jpg


The gray-yellow cylinder is the objectiv. A black "hose" - a light guide - comes to it. At its other end, this light guide is connected to a laser source on the board. The objectiv is attached to a brown metal part with 4 holes. 4 screws provide adjustment of the laser beam direction.
After I bought a round lens with an optical power of -15 and tried to lean it against the body of the laser emitter - to the exit hole. The result is again positive! The focal point was now located about 950mm (37 inches) from the emitter. From this data, I calculated the optical power of the emitter objectiv, and calculated the optical power of the lens that I need to add to the lens to make the focal length 860mm (34 inches).
I tried to order the right lens on Aliexpress, but the price of $500 was not very suitable for me. I could easily buy an almost matching lens, with a power of -14 instead of -13.8, but its diameter was 65mm, and I need 6mm (0.236 inches). This eyeglass lens cost about $10. To begin with, I gave it to an eyeglasses workshop, where they could reduce its diameter to 27mm, while maintaining the coaxiality of the diameter and optical axis. They could not make the diameter smaller. After that, I glued the lens to a 6mm diameter steel cylinder using hot glue. And for 6 hours I grinding the lens with a CBN wheel. It was a very boring process.... But, at first I expected it to take much longer. In the end, I had a very small lens in my hands, 6mm in diameter and about 0.5mm (0.02 inches) thick. I installed it in the hole of the laser emitter objectiv, this is how it looks on the 3d model:

2022-09-24_23-00-55.png
1 - objectiv body
2 - POM sleeve
3 - lens
4 - paper pads
5 - aluminum sleeve, installed with an interference fit, holds the lens

As a result, the focal point of the laser beam was exactly where I wanted it to be, about 6-10 inches from the receiver. In fact, the laser turned out to be almost collimated.
The main idea of this epic is to carefully look at what you are buying :) If I had been more attentive and deciphered the model designation, I could have avoided all these difficulties.
This is what the receiver looks like with the cover removed, with the laser falling on it:
DSC_8666.JPG.f6d7f2cf6e5d6d48c2996e334f419228.jpg
Now it's time to align the laser with respect to the machine axes. In the XY plane (vertical plane), the laser is already positioned quite accurately because the welded frame is mounted on a grinded plate. In the XZ plane (horizontal plane), I set the beam with an accuracy of about 60 microns / 600mm. The final installation is done by tilting the laser lens using 4 screws inside the housing. I was able to achieve readings of about 20µm / 600mm on both axes. Renishaw says their NC4 needs about 10µm/100mm - so it looks like I could do even better than necessary.
Today I completed the 24V-5V optical isolation to connect to the High Speed Skip of my CNC system. The machine finally responded to the G31P2 command (I left G31 for the contact probe in the spindle), it remains to calibrate the entire system and I can finally please my workers with a working tool setter.

I will write a few more things about which questions may arise.
- the repeatability of the laser operation, which I found out when setting it relative to the axes of the machine, is about 1-3 microns. I have not yet tried to adjust the sensitivity using a tuning resistor on the receiver.
- why the hell did I even take apart the combined system and make a new frame for the receiver and emitter? If you look at the original bracket:
s-l500.jpg
it is obvious that an error with the measurement of a large diameter tool can lead to the destruction of the entire presetter. I have a phobia on this topic, I personally saw one destroyed presetter and my employee told me about another one. A 19-year-old guy, in practice in college, was put behind a machine with a laser measuring device. He needed to measure a disc cutter mounted on a mandrel. For such tools, it is imperative to pre-set the parameters, with an accuracy of at least + -0.25 inches. He did not know this, the tool was measured by default as an axial tool. Naturally, the length was measured to the mounting bolt of the cutter. As a result, everything was, the quote "Very, very bad"))))))
 
Quite impressive stuff !!!
The ability to cope with the reality and to invent and implement the solutions - amazing. The good engineer is not the one who knows all the answers. Nobody knows. The good engineer is the one who knows where to look for the answers.

I hope you bought the laser along with its interface.

One of my first laser installations was on old Makino A-85 horizontal. I had to built same as yours u-shaped bracket, and find out that due to the not conforming brutal physic rules, the "masts" oscillated at each start and stop of the movement. The influence on measurement results was obvious.

You mentioned that you looked for some "pop up" attachment to place the TS27R in working area when needed. My reluctance to laser tool setter is known to forum members. I would look on the e-bay for lathe motorized tool setting arm like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/202550838444?_ul=BY for example. Minor mechanical changes to the device, simple installation. Quite a number of this solution executed by me, working flowless.

But in any case once more BRAVO, and thank you for sharing your experience.

Stefan

Cogito Ergo Sum
 
I hope you bought the laser along with its interface.
Alas, I did not have enough money for the interface :(
One of my first laser installations was on old Makino A-85 horizontal. I had to built same as yours u-shaped bracket, and find out that due to the not conforming brutal physic rules, the "masts" oscillated at each start and stop of the movement. The influence on measurement results was obvious.
Yes, I thought about the possibility of such oscillations in the horizontal plane. But I found on the Web a lot of photos of installed laser setters on much less rigid structures. If necessary, I will reduce the speed of movement during the measurement and / or increase the temporary delay. It's not a big problem.
You mentioned that you looked for some "pop up" attachment to place the TS27R in working area when needed. My reluctance to laser tool setter is known to forum members. I would look on the e-bay for lathe motorized tool setting arm like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/202550838444?_ul=BY for example. Minor mechanical changes to the device, simple installation. Quite a number of this solution executed by me, working flowless.
Oh yes, I was thinking about something like that. In hindsight, this would probably have been an easier solution. But, if I look back again - if I had a little better understanding of what I was buying, the laser would have worked at the beginning of the summer. But with a laser, we will be able to measure and check the integrity of our face mill with diamond inserts - it cannot be measured by contact methods.
 
One of my first laser installations was on old Makino A-85 horizontal
Do you happen to have instructions for setting up the BLUM measuring cycles? I found the cycles themselves, and found instructions for using them. But there are a couple of dozen parameters that "bind" programs to the machine, and I still have a big problem with setting them up.
 
Quite impressive stuff !!!
The ability to cope with the reality and to invent and implement the solutions - amazing. The good engineer is not the one who knows all the answers. Nobody knows. The good engineer is the one who knows where to look for the answers.

I hope you bought the laser along with its interface.

One of my first laser installations was on old Makino A-85 horizontal. I had to built same as yours u-shaped bracket, and find out that due to the not conforming brutal physic rules, the "masts" oscillated at each start and stop of the movement. The influence on measurement results was obvious.

You mentioned that you looked for some "pop up" attachment to place the TS27R in working area when needed. My reluctance to laser tool setter is known to forum members. I would look on the e-bay for lathe motorized tool setting arm like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/202550838444?_ul=BY for example. Minor mechanical changes to the device, simple installation. Quite a number of this solution executed by me, working flowless.

But in any case once more BRAVO, and thank you for sharing your experience.

Stefan

Cogito Ergo Sum

This sounds interesting. Some picture of the motorized arm in a horizontal would be awesome.
 
Do you happen to have instructions for setting up the BLUM measuring cycles? I found the cycles themselves, and found instructions for using them. But there are a couple of dozen parameters that "bind" programs to the machine, and I still have a big problem with setting them up.
No, unfortunately I have not.

Stefan
Cogito Ergo Sum
 
After 3 days of searching and spending $60, I finally got hold of documents explaining the parameters in the BLUM measurement cycles. I am attaching them, I think many people will find it useful.
 

Attachments

  • SET-UP INSTRUCTIONS FOR BLUM MEASURING CYCLES P87.0634-030.360 VERSION V5D ENGLISH.pdf
    538.6 KB · Views: 22
  • INBETRIEBNAHMEANLEITUNG BLUM MESSZYKLEN P87.0634-030.360 VERSION V5D GERMAN.pdf
    579.6 KB · Views: 12
When I was debugging the measuring cycles on the machine, a couple more problems arose.
First part. Bloom cycles, like Renishaw cycles, are suitable for almost all occasions in life, but they are quite difficult to master. One cycle for the drill, another cycle for the cutter - all these cycles and their arguments need to be studied. It's a waste of work when the operator just needs to measure the length of the tool. We need to make some kind of program that will call Bloom cycles using M-code.
Second part. How does measurement work on a machine with a mechanical setter? For example, consider a drill, or a small diameter end mill. The machine turns on the slow rotation, or does not turn on the rotation, and touches the measuring surface of the setter.
Now we move on to the laser. It is calibrated at a certain spindle speed, and measuring at other speeds will result in an error - quite a large error, 10 microns or more. Moreover, the higher the value of this speed, the higher the accuracy of measurements (the standard rpm for BLOOM is 3.000 rpm, I left it unchanged). It would seem that you should always turn on the same rotation speed at which the calibration took place. Now let's imagine that the spindle does not have a short half-inch diameter endmill, but a 0.1-inch diameter, 10-inch long drill bit. If you spin it up to 3.000 rpm while the drill is in the air, then we will get a deep scratch on the machine casing :)

To solve both problems, I wrote a small program.
To put it very briefly, it includes a small (100-200 rpm) rotation speed, measures the length of the tool (in this case, the spindle axis coincides with the laser axis) and the radius of the tool at a certain distance from the end. If the radius is greater than a certain value, the program turns on the working rpm and calls the BLOOM cycle for the corresponding tool type. If the radius is less than the allowable one, the program indicates an error and requires manual input of RPM. In this case, the program assumes that the operator knows what they are doing and immediately activates the working rpm and calls the BLOOM cycles.
In more detail, the program checks the total length of the tool - if it is less than the allowable limit, then the working rpm are immediately activated. Obviously, if the tool nose is 1 inch from the spindle nose, such a tool can be turned at 3,000 rpm. After measuring the coordinate of the end of the tool, if the measured length is greater than a certain value, the shank radius is measured at a certain distance from the end. If the tool is 10" long and 0.5" in diameter at the tip, but at the same time, at a distance of 4" for example, the tool already has a 1" shank, it can be turned up to 3,000 rpm.
The program also measures the length at the center and at a certain offset from the center at a working RPM and compares the difference between the two measurements with the allowable difference. If the difference is greater than the allowable value, the tool is considered a drill/spherical cutter and is measured in the center. If the difference is less than acceptable, the tool is considered an end/face cutter and is measured close to the outside diameter. The program also provides various length adjustments depending on the diameter of the tool. I don't know why BLOOM didn't foresee this, this thing obviously measures a 0.1" cutter and a 5" cutter differently. Of course, the program can immediately specify the desired type of tool - in this case, the working rpm are switched on immediately and only the specified type is measured - the length in the center, the length with an offset from the center or the radius.
I hope my work is useful to someone. There are some imperfections here, I hope someday I will fix them.

%
O9021(M186)
IF[#8EQ#0]THEN#8=0(E0)
#101=10.(Y OFFSET 1)
#102=3.(Y OFFSET 2)
#103=5.(Y OFFSET 3)
#104=2.(Y OFFSET 4)
#105=2.(Y OFFSET 5)
#106=2.(Y OFFSET 6)
#110=100.(MEAS. LENGHT OFFSET 1)
#111=10.(INSTRUMENT MIN D)
#112=200.(MEAS. LENGHT OFFSET 2)
#113=20.(SHANK MIN D)
#115=25.(MIN LENGHT)
#116=120.(FIRST S)
#117=3000(WORK S)
#118=1.(R OFFSET FOR LENGHT MEAS. WITH D>#121)
#119=0.036(W4 LENGHT DELTA FOR D>#121)
#120=0.15(#120*R=RADIUS OFFSET FOR L MEAS.)
#121=40.(MAX D FOR MILL WITHOUT W4)
#122=0.1(MAX LEHGHT DIFF. DRILL-MILL)
#123=8.(MAX LENGHT DIFF.)
#124=6.(D1 FOR DELTA LENGHT)
#125=0.005(W FOR D1)
#126=8.(D2 FOR DELTA LENGHT)
#127=0.008(W FOR D2)
#128=12.(D3 FOR DELTA LENGHT)
#129=0.01(W FOR D3)
#130=0(X MEAS. POINT)
#131=0(Y MEAS. POINT)
#132=0(Z COORD. FIRST TOUCH)
#133=0(Y FIRST MOVE UP)
#134=0(Y FIRST MOVE DOWN)
#135=0(Y SECOND MOVE UP)
#136=0(Y SECOND MOVE DOWN)
#140=0(LENGHT>#110+#115)
#141=0(DIFF. LENGHT CENTER-NOT CENTER)
#142=0(ROUGH Z OFSET)
#143=0(ROUGH Y OFFSET)
#144=0(R OFFSET FOR LENGHT MEAS.)
#145=0(AUTOMATE W)
IF[#2EQ#0]THEN#2=0
IF[#8EQ#0]THEN#8=0
IF[#19EQ#0]THEN#19=0.05
IF[#26EQ#0]THEN#26=1.5(Z OFFSET R MEAS.)
G91G28Z0
IF[#5024EQ180]GOTO3
G91G28X0Y0
N3
IF[#5024EQ180]GOTO8(B=180)
IF[#5024LT180]GOTO6(B<180)
IF[#5024GT180]GOTO7(B>180)
N6G00B[180-#5024]
GOTO8
N7G00B[360-#5024+180]
N8
G49
#118=#5043-#5023(ACTIVE Z OFFSET)
G90
M09M05
IF[#20EQ#0]THEN#20=#700
IF[#700EQ#20]GOTO10
G65P9020T#20
N10
IF[#19NE#0]GOTO20
IF[#8NE0]GOTO40(MEAS. WITHOUT LENGHT CHECK)
IF[#2NE0]GOTO40(CHECK WITHOUT LENGHT CHECK)
M03S#116
#130=#5041+#605-#5021
#131=#5042+#545-#5022
G00X#130Y#131
G65P9006
G04P300
#132=#546+#115+#118
G91
G00Z-1.
IF[#1104EQ0]GOTO302
IF[#1102EQ0]GOTO302
(CHECK LASER BEFORE MEASUREMENT)
G90
G31P2Z#132F#618(Z TOUCH)
G00Z#5063
IF[#5023LT[#546+#115]]GOTO301(LENGHT TOO SMALL)
#142=#5023-#546(ROUGH Z OFSET)
IF[#5023LT[#546+#115+#110]]GOTO40(SMALL LENGHT CHECK)
IF[#5023LT[#546+#115+#112]]THEN#140=1(LENGHT<#115+#112)
IF[#5023GE[#546+#115+#112]]THEN#140=2(LENGHT>#115+#112)
G91G00Z-[#110](MOVE TO SHANK)
G90
#133=#5042+[#545+#612-#5022]
G31P2Y#133F#618(MOVE UP)
G91G00Y#101(MOVE UP+)
G90
#134=#5062-#102
G31P2Y#134F#630(MOVE DOWN)
G91Y-[#103](MOVE DOWN-)
G90
#135=#5062+#104
G31P2Y#135F#630(MOVE UP)
G91Y#105(MOVE UP+)
G90
#136=#5062-#106
G31P2Y#136F#631(MOVE DOWN)
G00Y#5062
#143=#5022-#545(ROUGH Y OFFSET)
IF[[#5022-#545]LT[#111/2]]GOTO300
IF[#140EQ1]GOTO100
IF[#140EQ2]GOTO200
GOTO100
N200
#131=#5042+#545-#5022
G00Y#131
G91
G00Z[#110-#112]
G90
#133=#5042+[#545+#612-#5022]
G31P2Y#133F#618(MOVE UP)
G91G00Y#101(MOVE UP+)
G90
#134=#5062-#102
G31P2Y#134F#630(MOVE DOWN)
G91Y-[#103](MOVE DOWN-)
G90
#135=#5062+#104
G31P2Y#135F#630(MOVE UP)
G91Y#105(MOVE UP+)
G90
#136=#5062-#106
G31P2Y#136F#631(MOVE DOWN)
G00Y#5062
IF[[#5022-#545]LT[#113/2]]GOTO303
G65P9007
N100GOTO40
N20M03S#19
GOTO50
N40M03S#117
G65P9007
N50
G91G28Z0
G90
IF[#8EQ2]GOTO90(R MEASUREMENT)
IF[#8EQ1]GOTO92(MILL LENGHT MEAS.)
#[#658+#20]=#142(ROUGH Z OFFSET)
#[#659+#20]=#143(ROUGH Y OFFSET)
G65P9602B#2H#20R0.03S#19(CENTER LENGHT MEAS.)
IF[#8EQ3]GOTO500(DRILL MEASURE)
#142=#646(CENTER LENGHT OFFSET)
N90G65P9603B[ABS[#2]]H#20Z#26R0.05E2.(R MEASUREMENT)
IF[#8EQ2]GOTO500(R MEASUREMENT)
GOTO94
N92#647=#[#659+#20]
N94IF[#647LE[#121/2]]GOTO100(D<#121)
IF[#647GT[#121/2]]GOTO200(D>#121)
N100
#144=[#647-[#647*#120]](R OFFSET FOR LENGHT MEAS.)
IF[#647LT[#124/2]]THEN#145=#125.(DELTA L FOR D<#124)
IF[#647LT[#126/2]]THEN#145=#127.(DELTA L FOR #124<D<#126)
IF[#647LT[#128/2]]THEN#145=#129.(DELTA L FOR #126<D<#128)
IF[#647GT[#128/2]]THEN#145=[#129*[#129/#127]](DELTA L FOR #128<D<#121)
GOTO250
N200
#144=[#647-#118](R OFFSET FOR LENGHT MEAS.)
#145=#119(WITH DELTA L)
N250
G65P9603B#2H#20X#144R0.03E1.W#145(CENTERLESS LENGHT MEAS.)
IF[#8EQ1]GOTO500
#141=ABS[#142-#646](DIFF. LENGHT CENTER-NOT CENTER)
IF[#141GT#123]GOTO304
IF[#141LE#122]GOTO500(MILL-LENGHT DIFF.<#122)
#[#658+#20]=#142(Z OFFSET CENTER)
#[#660+#20]=0(LENGHT WEAR)
N500
GOTO8888
N300#3000=1(D TOO SMALL-NEED S)
N301#3000=2(LENGHT TOO SMALL)
N302#3000=3(LENGHT TOO BIG)
N303#3000=4(SHANK D TOO SMALL-NEED S)
N304#3000=5(LENGHT DIFF. TOO BIG)
N8888
M05
M99
%
 








 
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