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Intuit Payments Network

AndyF

Stainless
Joined
Nov 3, 2003
Location
Phelps, NY, USA
Anyone using this? I received a promotional email from QuickBooks about it and from the email it looks like it would be cheaper and less risky than credit card payments and faster than a check.
 

rb07565

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 16, 2011
Location
Western Nebraska USA
I use intuit to accept credit card payments via smart phone. It works well. The swiper doesn't always work but if it doesn't you just type in the number. The money is usually in the bank account the next day.
 

ChrisP

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 3, 2012
Location
Hutchinson, Kansas
I use Intuit Merchant Services for credit cards. I don't have a smart phone, so I have to manually key in the numbers on my computer. It takes 2 business days for the money and last I knew, it was 1% more to do it that way. I went out and bought a small credit card imprinter that I carry in the pickup. That way I can get a copy of the card and they get an immediate receipt. I just staple the imprinter receipt to the copy of their invoice that I keep for my records. So far, it has worked out great for me.

Chris
 
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AndyF

Stainless
Joined
Nov 3, 2003
Location
Phelps, NY, USA
The Intuit payment network isn't for credit card payments, it looks more like PayPal, but would cost less. Here is a link: https://ipn.intuit.com/ . From a 30 second look, it seems attractive - only $0.50 no matter the transaction size, but everything I've ever done through Intuit has always ended up being more expensive than I expected, so I'm looking for a catch.
 

HuFlungDung

Diamond
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Location
Canada
I wonder what liabilities you incur by having customer credit card information on file? Does one have to take extraordinary security measures to ensure that the data is secure? What happens if your computer gets stolen, or hacked into?
 

ChrisP

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 3, 2012
Location
Hutchinson, Kansas
HuFlungDung,

When you submit numbers, either swiped or typed, the data is encrypted. Unless you type the number into your computer somewhere other than, in my case, Intuit Merchant Services, there is nothing to find, as far as I know. Disclaimer: I'm a weldor :), not a computer guy:angry:. This information was told by the representative at Inuit because I asked the same questions. There is a list of rules that must be followed with the credit card information. One of the biggest no-no's, you can't keep the 3 digit code on the back on file anywhere, electronically or written. I am the only one who enters this information and I keep my files locked up. It's like anything business related, you have to take steps to protect yourself.

I resisted taking anything but cash or check until one of my bigger customers I recently got said, "We really like to pay with a credit card." After some discussion, I started taking them.

Hope this helped, Chris
 

Edster

Diamond
Joined
Feb 8, 2003
Location
Illinois
I wonder what liabilities you incur by having customer credit card information on file? Does one have to take extraordinary security measures to ensure that the data is secure? What happens if your computer gets stolen, or hacked into?

I used to have the old school imprinter with the carbon copys. With that system you need to be pci compliant. Basically you shouldn't keep any customer credit card info on file anywhere in any form.

PCI Compliance Guide Frequently Asked Questions

If you arent pci complient you have some extra fees to pay which is why I ended up canceling that merchant account.

My new account gets the info entered by hand or by swiper directly into the merchant service providers website so I never have any cc info on hand and I don't have to worry about pci compliance.
 

HuFlungDung

Diamond
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Location
Canada
Edster, yes, that is what I use as well, is a third party merchant service. What with the state of Windows being forever cursed with security issues, one just never knows when anything is safe on any PC, anywhere. I don't know if the merchant terminal is safe either, but it is their problem.
 

rabidchimp

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Location
Lakewood, WA
My buddy has a mandrel bending shop, and I pay him via this method. Works well for him, and doesn't costs him very little. Its a direct transfer from bank to bank, like a check. Intuit's a damn good company in my book. I say go for it.
-Aaron
 

HuFlungDung

Diamond
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Location
Canada
I wouldn't argue that Intuit is, or is not a good company, but their software is running on a general purpose operating system that is structurally deficient so far as security goes. A Point of Sale terminal can, at least, be dedicated to nothing but dealing with cards and the security required to keep things safe.

I use Quickbooks as well, but I have no idea whether the backup file is encrypted, or not. It is password protected, but that is not necessarily proof of security. And the 'active' version of the company file, is that encrypted?
 

SRT Mike

Stainless
Joined
Feb 20, 2007
Location
Boston MA
I wouldn't argue that Intuit is, or is not a good company, but their software is running on a general purpose operating system that is structurally deficient so far as security goes. A Point of Sale terminal can, at least, be dedicated to nothing but dealing with cards and the security required to keep things safe.

I use Quickbooks as well, but I have no idea whether the backup file is encrypted, or not. It is password protected, but that is not necessarily proof of security. And the 'active' version of the company file, is that encrypted?


Actually, Windows is the most secure operating system there is. The problem is that the users are structurally deficient :) People download porn, click "yes" on pop-up windows, and let their nephew install a game he heard about on Facebook - and they don't take the time to run virus and spyware scanners, or do something when their computer is acting up. Then they have problems and blame the OS. No different than the people who drive forever without changing their oil, then blame the manufacturer for making a POS car when it goes wrong.


As for the storing CC numbers - PCI compliance enforces some very strict measures if you want to be PCI compliant and store CC numbers... like having the computer with card numbers in a separate and locked room with access control, etc, etc. If you are not PCI complaint, you just pay an additional monthly fee (around $30-50 or so), sort of an insurance.

I don't think the merchant is liable if they are hacked and card numbers stolen... sure, it will look bad, but the card processor is not going to come after you. It's a little known fact that when you use a credit card to pay for something, it is actually the merchant who is shouldering the risk. Most folks assume the card holder is tak
 








 
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