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Is history wrong about Henry Maudslay, Palmer etc. ?

SteveM

Diamond
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Location
Connecticut
According to Wayne Moore, the inch in the US was standardized to 25.4000508 mm in 1893, in England, it was standardized to 25.399956 mm and Canada adopted 25.4 mm in 1951, so at that time, there were three different inch standards.

Luckily for school children the world over, we all adopted the Canadian standard around 1959.

Steve
 

Oldwrench

Titanium
Joined
May 21, 2009
Location
Wyoming, USA
Can you spot any similarities between these two vehicles?
Aside from the close resemblance of the wheels (what a perfect illustration of styles coming full circle!) considerable attention was paid to the lines and the stance of both vehicles, subject to the technical limitations of their respective production. You can bet that whoever drew the carriage took as much care with the lines as the latter-day Solid Works jock.
 

Oldwrench

Titanium
Joined
May 21, 2009
Location
Wyoming, USA
Orville Wright Fly's the Connie
lindbergh meeting the wrights.
crew of apollo 8 meeting lindbergh.

This an uninterrupted link in three hops - kitty hawk to paris to the moon.

Maudsley to a sub-micron mask aligner by ASM. Not a far stretch.


Nailed it. NAILED IT.

:bowdown:
 

Billtodd

Titanium
Isn't history often wrong about who was the actual first or inventor.
Light bulbs, radio, airplanes, assembly line, window/mouse operating systems?
Sometimes Innovators that made it practical, popular, or got the first patent are the names we learn and does this really matter?
The names we remember did something right.
Bob

Yes, it is said that history is written by the victors , and that history only records the winners.

Second coolest picture - lindbergh meeting the wrights.
Third coolest picture - crew of apollo 8 meeting lindbergh.

This an uninterrupted link in three hops - kitty hawk to paris to the moon.

An aside:

The late Sir Patrick Moore believed himself to be the only person to have met the first aviator, Orville Wright, the first man in space, Yuri Gagarin, and the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong.[SUP][112][/SUP]
 

Gary McGarity

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 9, 2015
Aside from the close resemblance of the wheels (what a perfect illustration of styles coming full circle!) considerable attention was paid to the lines and the stance of both vehicles, subject to the technical limitations of their respective production. You can bet that whoever drew the carriage took as much care with the lines as the latter-day Solid Works jock.

They both have spoked wheels with rubber tires and Timken roller bearings.
Both have spring suspension.
The front two wheels pivot on a vertical axis to steer the vehicle.
The rear two wheels are on a fixed axle, and simply follow the front.
The bodies of the two vehicles sit up from the ground ('ground clearance') to go over humps and small obstructions.
The riders enter the side of the vehicles and sit on a padded and upholstered seat, with their feet on the floor board. They face forward, in the direction of travel.
Both vehicles were made to hold four people, but might hold six, if they are slim.
There is a roof over the riders.
There are headlights for night riding.
The power source is in the front, and the operator is behind the power source.
There are fenders to prevent mud being thrown up when in the rain.
The young man has the young girl in the back seat.

It's easy to see how the automobile evolved from the carriage. But if your mind only sees differences, you might miss this. The first automobiles were called 'horseless carriages' after all.
 

Gary McGarity

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 9, 2015
What we need is a definition of a 'screw cutting lathe'.
Is it defined by function?
Is it defined by mechanical composition?
Are there different categories of 'screw cutting lathe'?
 








 
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