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Is there a good video or thread or resource for squaring up a column and spindle on a surface grinder?

Ec1

Plastic
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
I have a Reid 618 rollerway that a mouse got into the vertical worm screw in the column and made a mess after I purchased it and I didn't know till after I moved the machine 5 months later. Worked fine when purchased, then it was frozen with rust from mouse pee. So I bought another grinder and swapped the column. One day this winter I hope to shim it to square in all three directions to the spindle and get the machine back together. In my mind I think I can figure it out but it would be nice to have a "procedure" to follow or watch a video before I dive in!
 
What are you going to grind on it? If all your going to grind flatness the column doesn't need to be square. If your going to grind slots or side grind, squareness is needed. If the column is out of square and all your doing is flat grinding, when you dress the wheel your set. If you email me I can email you a PDF of the book "testing Machine Tools" that shows the tests needed when building new machines or rebuilding. I also think in one of last weeks posts here, someone linked it here.
 
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The rough way test is to hold a 90* square off the chuck to see how a new parked wheel is squared to the chuck. Do this at the far long (right or left ) end of the chuck where the chuck was little used.

Another hack but ok method is to dress a wheel bottom, then hand dress the wheel side facing you concave/dished, and carefully side grind a standing-up part. looking for an even cross-hatch grind.

wheel side grinding is very dangerous so be very careful coming in to touch.
 
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What are you going to grind on it? If all your going to grind flatness the column doesn't need to be square. If your going to grind slots or side grind, squareness is needed. If the column is out of square and all your doing is flat grinding, when you dress the wheel your set. If you email me I can email you a PDF of the book "testing Machine Tools" that shows the tests needed when building new machines or rebuilding. I also think in one of last weeks posts here, someone linked it here.
Going to grind any and everything, unfortunately so going to have to be good every which way.
 
I’d start with getting the column square to the down feed direction with a height gauge on the bare table. Then square on rotation of the column in “plan view” looking down on the machine WRT the infeed direction along the bare spindle. Tenths indicator?

Then “left-right” tilt along the table traverse direction. Less critical in the grand scheme of things. Maybe a height gauge on the bare table and spindle location at a low wheel height and a max wheel height.

This is how I’d approach it having never had this issue. Anyone else feel free to poke holes.
 
Thanks Richard for the PDF! And for the other suggestions as well... I will study up!
 
These are a crudely made grinder. I worked for the manufacturer, Fayscott, as a field service engineer. Necessary to pull the table when being moved or the rollers will Brinell the steel way strips. The strips were epoxied to the cast iron cross slide. Epoxy failure was not uncommon. The elevation, Acme screw is thread milled, without secondary grind. Even new, the "feel" was off. The threaded, bolt holes for mounting the column were often not counter sunk. Near impossible to get repeatability scraping the column for alignment. Assembly personnel would cheat by tweaking torque to twist the column into square. The Pope or Whitnon spindles were excellent. If removed you'll need a cylindrical square to realign. For a hobbyist it's a fine to learn on. In later employ I ran a Mitsui hand freed grinder. Its quality was impressive. Now own a rebuilt, Bridgeport 815 grinder that suits me fine.
 
I didn't remove the table when I moved it, but at least the column bolts are countersunk on this one.
 
I'd probably go at it with a good level and 90 degree square of some sort. Level the machine so the ways are level in both directions, then shim the column to match. As said above, it's probably not as fussy as you'd think.
 
I suspect there is a small tweak between the column square and wheel square to the fresh ground chuck.

It may be troublesome to make one near zero and ignore the other, or find the other can't be made. Suppose that the collum is made square and then the spindle tweaging that Carbide Bob mentioned is not enough to make the spindle square.
The end result should be the wheel/spindle is near dead-square with the chuck, and the long travel..
This ensures the bottom grind and the face grind will be a true 90, and a slott will be about .0002/.0003 wider than the wheel.
Yes, the spindle has to be axial and radial square to the long travel to achieve this.

The column being .005 off in 10 inches doesn't matter much for most grinding jobs, but the wheel being .002 out of square in 6" is a mile

Likely Richard has a procedure what to adjust first..and that might depend on the condition of the machine.
 
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I imagine it's going to be a lot of fussing around back and forth, when I pulled the bad column off the grinder it had a few shims. Maybe .003" at the most. in two spots.
 
Only .003 shims the MGR did a pretty good job, guess I would put it together with even Tourq and figure out what shims would be needed to make the wheel/spindle straight and vertical true..then add the shims then test again.
(The error in x inches makes x inches in the distance you wish to move/adjust).
but I am just a hack at machine building. what Richard recommends is likely best.
 








 
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