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Issue dressing diamond wheel.

mike.thomas1

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 24, 2015
Ive been chasing my tail trying to dress this 220grit diamond wheel. It was mildly abused before I ended up with it, having its leading edge worn considerably more than the rest. Im using a Norton brake dresser that is operating properly and infeeding in .002 or so per pass. Problem is that I cannot get a flat face. I end up with a crown no matter what I try. What am i missing?
 

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michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
I used to flip my dresser wheel with a pencil so I would have a rolling start, and not go full off the dresser at the end of cross travel, and lift off the wheel, not go off with extending the cross off the end of the wheel width.
Increase wheel stock removal on the wheel and dresser center taking .oo1 on the cross infeed, and then taking .oo1 on the cross outfeed from about the center of the wheel. cross travel to about the last 1/16 of the dresser. The sound tells you of going off, don't go full off.
Yes, the dresser should not have axial or radial play / the brake should be slowing the dresser wheel...free-wheeling with a 7" wheel at 3400 RPM would have the dresser going about 8,000 RPM , way too fast.
(X)Some guys would start the dresser wheel with an air hose shot..I thought that was bad for the machine and the dresser.
(X)Going full off the wheel allows the dresser to restart on the wheel and so can chatter.

*Agree the pencil trick could be dangerous if one was not care full.
 
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michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
Doc in episode 92, up grinding verse down grinding might have added a safety note about climb grinding...
(it should be called "grind side climb side."IMHO)

Doc failed to mention...
With climb grinding the most important aspect/issue is that in climb grinding the wheel can suck the part under the wheel due to slack in the long travel to cause a sudden uncontrolled increase in long travel speed and the stock removal. That can cause a part to topple over and go flying off the chuck. or cause an RPM stall and so cause a burn.

(it should be called "grind side climb side."IMHO)

Down grinding is incremental down feeds on the part as the long travel executes left and right versus cross grinding where the down dial is set and incremental cross feeds take the stock.
IMHO.
 
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michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
There is usually clearance in a wheel bore because it has to be there or the wheel would not go on.
Good quality diamond wheels have very even thickness of diamonds.
In order to not hit aluminum (or what the wheel is made of) at the end of wheel life, one should indicate the wheel at first mounting to make it near zero before using the wheel. Good to mount a diamond wheel very tight and leave it on that same mount.

Yes once mounted it is best to dress it.
 
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eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
Can you post a video? Seeing exactly what you are doing and what is happening would be helpful to give us more to diagnose. Also, what are the specs of both the diamond wheel and the dressing wheel?
 

M. Roberts

Aluminum
Joined
May 11, 2021
Mike,hello. Do you have any more details on the wheel? Specifically what type of bond, resin or vitrified? As mentioned in another reply, brake dressers are really only effective up to "x" SPM; if you have anything larger than an 8" wheel, the BD may not be the way to go. I have had the best success with a G-II Truing devise, but have been successful with a molly stick, although a PIA.
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
Going off the wheel at the front and back and then coming back to contact is a poor way to brake dress. Cross-feed in one direction to where the sound gets lower..then go the other way. pick straight up at the wheel center when done.

You might spin up the dresser with a drill motor to see if it is braking.

One can dress with grinding by taking workpiece stock with the highest place of the wheel.
Grinding a piece of brass or mild steel can dress a diamond wheel.
 

CarbideBob

Diamond
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Location
Flushing/Flint, Michigan
Not sure of your motions.

Center of dresser needs to be on center of spindle not ahead or behind like you would do with a dressing diamond on a standard white wheel.
Downfeed some, infeed off the dressing stone, downfeed and come back out off the stone.
Reduce the amount of downfeed each pass.
Last passes should be fed when off one side of the wheel to prevent crowning.
.002 off of one of my wheels would be about .050 worth of downfeed but this depends on the grade and grit of stone used.
Brake controlled dressers must be hand started before they contact. Do not let the diamond wheel start it.
I do not feed while in contact if possible.

The biggest problem people have is a dressing stone not correct for the wheel.
If I try to use one of my stones for a 1200 grit wheel on a 220 it just disappears and I would end up using a inch worth of downfeed.
If I try to use to the ones for 220 on a 1200 it just screams at me and does nothing.

I have never had a problem with wheel size and have used brake dressers on 22 inch wheels.
We normally dress a wheel every hour or two of use. Some will go 8 hours on a dress. PCD likes to be dressed every part or even more often.
Coloring the wheel with a fat sharpie helps to see what is happening.


Bob
You may want to kick the wheel dresser up so that you are using the corner of the stone and can clear the dresser body when the stone smaller.
Most of my dressing wheels/stones end up looking like below.
 

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