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Large (75 hp) single phase motors, "Written Pole"

lucky7

Active member
Wonder what power company (and neighbors) think of rural 100hp single phase motors. There website seems to say rural is primary market for their 30-100hp motors.

L7
 

DDoug

Active member
Wonder what power company (and neighbors) think of rural 100hp single phase motors. There website seems to say rural is primary market for their 30-100hp motors.

L7

One of the principal investors is a manitoba rural electric co-op.
 

lucky7

Active member
One of the principal investors is a manitoba rural electric co-op.


Yeah, I read some of their info. If I understand correctly a 100hp single phase motor will require approx 1/4 the usual starting inrush amps, but for 15 seconds or more. So basically a 25hp starting load that doesn’t just give a less than one second “flicker” to same line loads but a 15 second drop. Wondering what this would do to line integrity sensors and other folks on your line.

Not being an electrical engineer, I’m interested in pro’s opinions and where does this fit with say, vfd set ups rurally.

And the Manitoba Hydro subsidiary you were mentioning is Meridium Power. This is not a rural electric co-op, rather a Provincial Crown corp subsidiary. They were, if I understood correctly, wanting to sell the technology all across Canada after being one of the original beta testers. Not sure if that went anywhere; this was almost twenty years ago. Thus, my question, wondering what a power authority thinks of it now.

L7
 

DDoug

Active member
Yeah, I read some of their info. If I understand correctly a 100hp single phase motor will require approx 1/4 the usual starting inrush amps, but for 15 seconds or more. So basically a 25hp starting load that doesn’t just give a less than one second “flicker” to same line loads but a 15 second drop. Wondering what this would do to line integrity sensors and other folks on your line.

Not being an electrical engineer, I’m interested in pro’s opinions and where does this fit with say, vfd set ups rurally.

And the Manitoba Hydro subsidiary you were mentioning is Meridium Power. This is not a rural electric co-op, rather a Provincial Crown corp subsidiary. They were, if I understood correctly, wanting to sell the technology all across Canada after being one of the original beta testers. Not sure if that went anywhere; this was almost twenty years ago. Thus, my question, wondering what a power authority thinks of it now.

L7

While the website is down, the original article I read in Farm Show stated that Meridium was spun off from said power authority or what ever you Kanucks call it.

They indicated that the motors would bring high HP to rural areas, eliminating diesel engine driven machinery.
 

JST

Moderator
.....................

They indicated that the motors would bring high HP to rural areas, eliminating diesel engine driven machinery.

Yep............ like your backup genset.... it'd run that sucker really well! :rolleyes5::nutter::crazy::willy_nilly:
 

DDoug

Active member
Yep............ like your backup genset.... it'd run that sucker really well! :rolleyes5::nutter::crazy::willy_nilly:

Uhm...yeah.

irrigation pumps run 24/7 for months at a time, the consumption of diesel fuel is a real cost & logistic problem.
 

JST

Moderator
Uhm...yeah.

irrigation pumps run 24/7 for months at a time, the consumption of diesel fuel is a real cost & logistic problem.


You weren't supposed to make sense.......

Neither were the folks who think your genset should run on electric..... apparently.
 

steve-l

Active member
Where these motors may make a lot of sense, depending on power factor and efficiency in driving a 500 lb flywheel and a 3 phase alternator, especially if they are synchronous. 3 phase motors can be smaller, lighter, have more torque and less expensive all around. Old technology, but very stable and the result is high quality 3 phase power. Perhaps even at high voltage to limit transmission losses to the pumps in the field.
 








 
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