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Large Wall Clock Will Not Work

GregS13

Plastic
Joined
Apr 23, 2024
Location
Central Illinois, USA
Hope I'm in the right place for this. I have a large Colonial wall clock made in West Germany that was given to me, but it won't work. The hook where the pendulum attaches moves left, ( facing the clock), but not to the right. The weights are all the way to the top. They are wound with a crank. It has been given to me by the widow of a very dear friend who just passed away.
Does anyone have any thoughts to get this going? I probably need to get it serviced.
Thanks in advance!
 

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I think you have the right idea. He did not have it running since his wife didn't like it making noise!
I know it has not run for over 15 years. Guess it qualifies to be serviced! :)
 
If you do not know of a clock repair person in your area, you could contact the Central IL chapter of the NAWCC and ask for help.


You can email Carl Lair, the chapter secretary, through this link: https://www.nawcc.org/local-chapters/?chapter=illinois&submit=Search

The dial has two places to wind, one for time and one for strike. If you do not want to hear it strike, you just wind the time side.

Larry
 
If you do not know of a clock repair person in your area, you could contact the Central IL chapter of the NAWCC and ask for help.


You can email Carl Lair, the chapter secretary, through this link: https://www.nawcc.org/local-chapters/?chapter=illinois&submit=Search

The dial has two places to wind, one for time and one for strike. If you do not want to hear it strike, you just wind the time side.

Larry
Good info Larry. I know about the left/right winding. She just like the ticking. I do!
Thanks
 
I'd take it to a pro, but one thing to add is that these old clocks do better when kept in continuous use. When allowed to sit, the joints will rust or tarnish and collect dust, and just a little bit of that can slow it down and stop it. Once a horologist has it cleaned and adjusted, keep it wound up. Where it's at in the house can have a big effect on how loud our "annoying" it is, but in general it seems like a generational thing as it used to be everyone had clocks like these, and now many people find them unsettling. I find them relaxing as they remind my of my grandparents place and my home growing up. You quickly get to where you don't listen to the ticking unless you intend to, even at night.

I have a W. German Coo-Coo clock that was stuck and a horologist no-quoted because it wasn't rare or valuable and it wouldn't be worth his time if it turned out to have bigger problems. On a whim I blew it out and oiled it with some light-weight oil further thinned with kerosene, then temporally added a little extra weight to the existing weights to work it in. I think I got lucky as it keeps very good time now with the only issue being the on/off switch for the chime doesn't work, but I can remove one of the weights for the same effect. Someday I'll need to crack it open again and clean it proper and see if I can get the switch working. I have a soft spot for old but less valuable time pieces like Timex watches and such.
 
Guessing one of the shafts has made some serious in its plate or the oil has turned to varnish. Take it out of the cabinet and inspect all the bearing hole. If any are oblong you have found the problem. If no wallowed holes, clean with acetone and re oil. Too much oil is very bad. Deform the end of a toothpick dab it in light oil like 3in1 to transfer the smallest amount.

The bearing holes in the plates are just holes and act as their own bushing. Extremely difficult to locate the precise hole position to add a bushing. It’s a best guess away from the worn area. If you can do that, the best part it yet to come. Imagine reassembly. Two plates with ~14 holes each, 2” long loose geared shafts have to mate with both plates. Assembly fun at its finest.

At this point, paying to have it done should sound like a good idea.
 
I would at least check the escapement, is centered not off to one side. Might have gotten out of wack in a move especially if the pendulum was attached.
BilL D
 
That clock, if it was made in West Germany is a modern ( post WW2 ) reproduction. The easiest thing to do is look for a new replacement movement.
It might be worth spending a few clams to have the nearest clock person look at it and try to get it running, but movement replacement is easy.
 
Most of the modern German clock movements have plated staffs and unbushed plates.
The plating replaces hardened staffs, when the plating wears off or the holes in the plates go egg shaped its time to replace the movement. Chelsea Clock still manufactures a high quality movement.
 








 
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