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Learning Fusion 360

rimcanyon

Diamond
Joined
Sep 28, 2002
Location
Salinas, CA USA
OK, stupid question time: I'm new to CAD and Fusion 360. Why does the Z axis point the wrong way when I open a sketch in Fusion 360?

i.e. I have Z Up set in my preferences, and the geometry symbol shows Z up: Screenshot 2023-12-22 at 2.25.49 PM.png

But in the Front view, the sketch Z axis has the values increasing going down:
Screenshot 2023-12-22 at 2.25.37 PM.png

I have visions of generating a program where all the Z axis moves are backwards to my intent. It's hard to think in terms of Z going down, when your mill has Z up.
 
Rim
The coordinate system of the model is totally divorced from the coordinate system of the CAM and g-code. So it doesn't matter which way any axis points in the model. The machinist/fabricator gets to choose different XYZ, and as many different ones as needed, during CAM and fabrication. The only thing that might be inconvenient about the model Z is that, say, the bottom view is not of the bottom, but you can redefine what is the bottom view using the little drop-down arrow next to the view cube.
RKlopp
 
What it means in the short run is that if I do an extrude, the thickness setting is a negative number. Yes the model looks ok, but it still begs the question as to why it is that way.
 
The upper right area that displays the side you can rotate to where you want and right click to reset the view as front
The plane you chose to start your sketch is the ZX, you have the ability to choose one of the 3 planes
As mentioned it doesn't really affect CAM unless you select the model origin as your CAM origin
 
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What it means in the short run is that if I do an extrude, the thickness setting is a negative number. Yes the model looks ok, but it still begs the question as to why it is that way.
When you start a sketch in Siemens NX you can choose the sketching plane, the origin of the coordinate system of the sketch, and the orientation of the axes. I am unaware of any other CAD program that allows this level of control of sketch planes and coordinate systems.

Fusion kinda doesn't care about any of that. As you progress through your model you will find that Fusion's coordinate systems for sketches is arbitrary. I've learned to not really pay attention to it in my workflow with Fusion. I think part of this is that the sketch doesn't necessarily define how the features are going to be used to create solids. Will it be extruded? Revolved? Will multiple features in the sketch be used in multiple ways?

If you do learn how to more strictly define coordinates and axes in sketches, please share. I haven't run into any issues related to it, but it's always good to have more tools in the toolbox.
 
I am unaware of any other CAD program that allows this level of control of sketch planes and coordinate systems.
ProE up to Wildfire did till I stopped using it a few years back. I did speak to Tech support about Inventor regarding this issue and basically they said it is what it is and they see no reason to change it.
 
ProE up to Wildfire did till I stopped using it a few years back.
You quite using Wildfire for Inventor ????? I think it's time for an intervention !!!

Wildfire is easily as good as nx, no idea why it is not as popular, except maybe that the people at ptc are such jerks.

But that doesn't seem to slow down autodicks, so ???
 
Money, I purchased Inventor for a company I worked at. ProE is a serious package like NX and CATIA and it is difficult to find people competent in using it. In 20 odd years in Australia I have only ever met one ProE user whereas when I worked in NZ it was common. Inventor, Solidworks and SolidEdge enable any YouTube wannabe to think they are an expert.

Bring on the flaming. I'll just same one thing before all the fanboys start bitch slapping each other. Serious corporations like Toyota design drive trains with ProE.
 
ProE is a serious package like NX and CATIA and it is difficult to find people competent in using it.
Yup, Big boy software, I only have one customer that uses Pro E, but they are one of the largest plastic mfg's in the world, So, big boy software!
 
Wildfire is easily as good as nx, no idea why it is not as popular, except maybe that the people at ptc are such jerks.

NX and CATIA are basically sovereign nation-states in the industry because of massive legacy lock-in at Fortune 500 scale customers. When a company like Daimler switches CAD/PLM systems, it is the sort of multi-year, board of directors level corporate initiative that MBA students analyze for the next 20 years and books get written about.

Wildfire is neither fish nor foul - it is too expensive for folks who would buy SolidWorks to consider it, but doesn't have the massive momentum of being force in the F500 world the way NX and CATIA do (where the suppliers all have to buy seats with a gun to their heads).

I think BMW is the biggest Wildfire user and while the Industrial Design/Form/CAD nerd in me appreciates what they are doing, not many normal people look at BMW's current offerings and say "Damn, what CAD package allowed them to make that magnificent beauty?"
 
Wildfire is neither fish nor foul - it is too expensive for folks who would buy SolidWorks to consider it, but doesn't have the massive momentum of being force in the F500 world the way NX and CATIA do (where the suppliers all have to buy seats with a gun to their heads).
The other thing is, we're probably not their target demographic. PTC has always been pretty much assholes to small shops. Not too many ship builders here, that I see :) I suspect they have customers (or they'd go broke) but not in areas where we frequent.
 








 
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