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Logan 10" rebuilding

wildo

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Well after a busy summer working on paying jobs I've found a bit of free time to get back to scraping.

Some pictures from my 1815 logan I'm rebuilding to give to my old boss/friend who's now retired.
I've had it for a couple years. I repainted it when I bought it a couple years ago. It's an okay lathe. If it wasn't sentimental reasons I would say doing this much work to it is a waste of time. The build quality and rigidity isn't there. But for his garage it will be a sweet little lathe. And it's good scraping practice !


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If nothing else it's quick to take apart. I've previously been through the whole thing so it's in reasonable shape. Surprisingly the bed wasn't twisted and it did not take much shimming under the main stand to get it true with the 199. I previously had leveled it with a 098 when I put it there.. Seeing as it was already level I decided to leave it bolted to the floor where it was.. The trade off being there isn't enough room to stand between the wall and bed.

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I got a rough idea of the wear on the ways measuring from the saddle gib ways front and rear. In hindsight I would've started scraping the outside ways first as it would've been easier to keep track of where I was.
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I scraped the top non bearing surface of saddle parallel to the relatively wear free cross slide ways so I could use it for a leveling surface. Then used feeler gauges to measure how much to remove from the rear flat way of the saddle to bring it level. I took .010" off on the shaper

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I made a couple more hand scrapers to help with the tiny ways. I used 1" wide spring steel from mcmaster and brazed the inserts in.
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I am using a foster 36" straight edge. The lathe ways are 42" so this added a bit more difficulty. I started off on the tailstock flat way as it did not have much for wear.

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Various attempts were made at measuring the progress of the inner vee way. This was not a successful one. The length, narrowness and cut outs for the headstock all combined to make kind of tedious.

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With the tailstock ways pretty good I used them to scrape the saddle ways which were a lot more more straight forward

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The issue I ran into was after scraping "straight down" ie; removing the same amount from the saddle flat way as I did the vee was that the flat ways of the saddle and tailstock ways were no longer level. I know I could've re-leveled the lathe, but my smooth brain couldn't handle that so I also scraped another .006" or something off the tailstock ways. Not a big deal on this as the ways are small.

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getting the saddle true to use a template for finishing the ways.

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Finishing the tailstock base parallel

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The spindle morse taper is non existent due to someone drilling into the spindle. As my 4 jaw is too big the 3 jaw chuck was the last resort for holding the test bar.

I had 0.016 to remove from the headstock base (!) Some double checks were made and I humbly set off scraper in hand.

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After scraping .005 from the flat ways I came to my senses and set up the headstock on the shaper.
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I also scraped another .006" or something off the tailstock ways. Not a big deal
Not a big deal? I really need to get a biax!

Looks good, keep the pictures coming!
 
I didn't end up using the biax much. I do not have the finesse with it on the narrow vees, plus the stand for the lathe shakes around when trying to take material off with it.

I got the headstock dialed in - took the better part of a day going back and forth with it to scrape the .005" I left on. I was a bit chicken to cut it any closer on the shaper.

I got the cross slide 90* and made a new gib, as I had issues getting the old one fitting well. I figured a tighter gib would work better.

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Ok what the heck.
Frustrated I worked on the compound and got it finished. The gib fit slightly better for it, but not how I wanted.

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The cross slide dovetail gib side - only contact on the upper portion;
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cross slide gib screws;
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Old and new gib for cross slide contact points in red. The old gib did not have dimples for the set screws, just center punch marks. Doesn't seem to matter;
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Is there any way to get the contact better? I got the gib sitting a bit better with no visible light around it, after putting more clearance around the dimples for the set screws, but there's still only contact in the top portion. It doesn't look like it can be improved on without moving the set screws.
 
Put the gib in and slide a long feeler gage then c-clamp the cross slide against the way. Then use a tap drill to go into the original tapped holes and spot drill appropriately 1/3 the thickness of the gib and dogpoint set screws. I've added a few extra screws too if the original screws are messed up.
 
Maybe the edges are too sharp and they’re interfering with the inside corners of the dovetail. Round the sharp edges with a file and relieve the inside corners with a hacksaw blade.
 
Nice work!

I've got exactly the same lathe -- a 58-year-old 10" Logan 1815. (It's now an 1875 because I bought a set of Logan legs.) I use it almost every time I am in the shop and have put quite a bit of time into mounting a DRO, fitting a VFD and 3-phase motor, and so on.

About 50 years ago, when I was a teenager, I was shown how to use the lathe by a close family friend, Mel Arsove, who used the lathe to make watchmaking tools. Mel bought the lathe new in 1965, and treated it with great care, so when I bought it from his widow many years ago, partly for sentimental reasons, it was in perfect condition. (To give a bit of insight into Mel, when he first got the lathe, he took it completely apart then reassembled it, making notes on the parts diagram about minor differences!)

I have at least a couple of thousand hours on that lathe and am very attached to it.

My lathe has flame hardened ways (indicated with an H in the serial number at the right hand side of the bed and on the change gear box). I have no trouble making very precise parts so have never done any scraping on it, although one of these days I will add oil grooves to the saddle and oiling points on the top. You might consider doing that, if you are set up for milling a pair of diagonal oil grooves it won't take long to add the oiling points on top.

Regarding the gibs for the cross slide, I see that you have added a dowel to prevent back and forth movement (climbing on the points of the screws). In my case I fitted a pair of dowel pins for that purpose, one in front and one in back, so that the gib is constrained against slop or play.

Here is the machine in Mel's workshop in the early 2000s (note that Mel poured a custom concrete stand and built drawers in the middle, then bolted the lathe to it, leveling it with shims):

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and here it is in my workshop:

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You'll see that I have built a new cross slide which encloses a DRO scale, see here for details. The photo above is from some years ago just after adding the DRO.

Since the lathe happens to be clean at the moment (I was setting up a part in the 4-jaw chuck a few days ago and then had to put it aside) I just took another photo. The DRO display shown above was moved to my cylindrical grinder, so the one below is slightly different. Note that the display is in mm, so the final digit is microns.

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Modifications to the lathe include a 3-phase motor/VFD/digital tachometer, the DRO, adding a pair of screws into the tailstock quill to capture MT2 tangs, adding a rubber pad on the drive cover, a new crossslide to enclose the DRO glass scale, doweling the gibs, sealing the gaps by the bed so that swarf can't get into the headstock, and others that I can't remember. Future "plans" include a taper attachment, oil grooves for the cross slide, an integrated DRO scale in the compound, proper preloaded bearings for the compound and cross-slide feeds, and a full length key in the tailstock (instead of the stock pin).

Soon after I got the lathe, I had some chatter issues, which motivated me to pull out the spindle and clean and regrease the bearings. I also replaced the rear bearing, which is a standard one. The front bearing is a special preloaded two-row bearing. I ended up purchasing a spare from Scott Logan (an SKF Explorer with the correct preload and a snap ring groove) which is still sealed and in the original box, because after cleaning and regreasing the original New Departure bearing has worked perfectly.

Cheers,
Bruce

PS: my machine is SN 81359. If yours is close, and you need documentation, let me know as I have all the original docs for mine.

PPS: Scott Logan is the grandson of the company's founder, and still sells parts for all of their machines. He also maintains an active newsgroup (more than 2000 members) for Logan lathe owners at https://groups.io/g/Lathe-List/
 
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Your work looks good. One thing I would do differently is I would mount a square on the bed and square the cross slide to the bed first and then square the headstock to the bed. The cross slide should not be perfectly square. It should be scraped so it is out of square .0008" in 12" so when facing a shaft the center is lower toward the center. Then scrape the head square to the cross slide. New machine factories scrape the tailstock stock before scraping the headstock. You can see these tests in the Sleshinger book. Testing Machine Tools . Keith Rucker on YouTube shows how its done on his post "scraping the cross slide on his LeBlonde lathe".
 
It's looking good! Thanks for posting! I like seeing "a little old tool room lathe" get some proper treatment.

I had a model 200 and a model 820 in my garage for a few years. They're great lathes for their class. I sold the 200 first and kept the better optioned 820, then sold it too to make room for other projects, but there are times I miss that 200. Even without the quick change gearbox and the simplified apron controls, it was just fun to operate. Mine was still in the original blue grey paint and had a small dealers water-release sticker on one leg.

While I had both lathes, I changed out the 200's compound cross slide for a "production style" T-slot cross slide that I believe came off of a model 400 (very basic model with a turret and hand feed everything). It was a bolt on upgrade that I used to mount an AXA tool post to the front with a riser and another tool post on the back for chamfering and cut-off. It has a T-slot on the side too for limit screws, which made an easy place to mount a DRO scale, between there and the follow rest screw holes on the saddle. I put the compound back on that lathe when I sold it and still have that T-slot cross slide sitting here in need of a new job. If anyone's interested I'll get some pictures of it. When I bought it it came with an extra saddle casting too, which was the same as the 200 and 820. A little worn, but functional. I think the OP's 1815 and related models use the same cross slide and saddle dimensions too.
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The 820 got a paint-job and functionality overhaul. I'll have to look around to see if I still have any pictures of it completed. This was before I took Richards class and If I had kept the 820, someday I would have gone down the OP's rabbit hole re-scraping everything, but old iron keeps finding it's way to me and I had to make room for machines that had more features, capacity, and sentimental value. Both of these lathes went to younger new owners though, so my hope is that they're out there promoting the trade/skill.
 
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That should be a sweet lathe when it's done. My 211 has some wear, but not enough that I worry about it. I'm actually surprised at how much material you had to remove. One oddity with my 211 is the headstock doesn't quite "point north" and I had to shim it to eliminate taper. It's definitely the headstock as I can detect imperfect alignment between the two bearing bores in the direction of the error. I've actually considered boring, sleeving and reboring, but I'd be as apt to create a new problem as fix the old.
 
While I had both lathes, I changed out the 200's compound cross slide for a "production style" T-slot cross slide that I believe came off of a model 400 (very basic model with a turret and hand feed everything). It was a bolt on upgrade that I used to mount an AXA tool post to the front with a riser and another tool post on the back for chamfering and cut-off. It has a T-slot on the side too for limit screws, which made an easy place to mount a DRO scale, between there and the follow rest screw holes on the saddle. I put the compound back on that lathe when I sold it and still have that T-slot cross slide sitting here in need of a new job. If anyone's interested I'll get some pictures of it. When I bought it it came with an extra saddle casting too, which was the same as the 200 and 820. A little worn, but functional. I think the OP's 1815 and related models use the same cross slide and saddle dimensions too.
The paint job made me laugh!

It looks like all four cross slides (including the one on the floor) are the conventional ones. Have you got a picture of the T-slot cross-slide?

If you don't need that or the spare saddle casting, I suggest that you offer them for sale on the Logan lathe group forum that I linked to above. Someone will be very happy, will buy them, and will put them to good use, maybe getting a damaged or partial machine functional again.

Cheers,
Bruce
 
The paint job made me laugh!

It looks like all four cross slides (including the one on the floor) are the conventional ones. Have you got a picture of the T-slot cross-slide?

If you don't need that or the spare saddle casting, I suggest that you offer them for sale on the Logan lathe group forum that I linked to above. Someone will be very happy, will buy them, and will put them to good use, maybe getting a damaged or partial machine functional again.

Cheers,
Bruce
I think those pictures were before I bought the T-slot set-up. I was mistaken though, as this cross-slide doesn't have a side T-slot. I confused it with the cross slide on our 10" Delta Rockwell which I used to mount a DRO scale to. I know I had started piecing together an old Heidenhain DRO set on the Logan 200, but didn't finish it before it was sold and I kept the scales. I think I got as far as having one scale working, though I don't remember which one.

It looks like you have to be a member to post on that Logan group, and I'd hate to be the new guy on there just posting stuff for sale. I'll put an ad up here on PM with some pictures though.
 
One thing I do on straight gibs is scrape them flat to your surface plate. Trying to scrape one against the dovetail on the mating slide can be a PITA. As long as the dovetail is scraped to your straight edge and the straight edge is scraped to the surface plate, the two should mate just fine. Then correct the drill dimples as Richard mentioned above. This does not apply to tapered gibs. Ken
 
Wow thanks for sharing pictures and stories of your logan lathes!

RE: the cross slide gib. I followed Richard's method - clamping cross slide to saddle with gib sandwiched to spot the holes. (re-spotting as I had already spotted them previously)

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Same deal :rolleyes:
It's not touching in any of the corners - the angle of the photo is misleading. I have scraped it flat multiple times. Tried gibs with more clearance, tried with the dowel installed etc etc.
When I first got the lathe - before scraping and with a different gib I had the exact same problem and spent a lot of time trying to get it sitting flat.

I will try putting a shallower angle point on the screws to spread the pressure out across the spot in the gib, rather than just at the point.

I moved onto bigger and better things in the meantime - the apron and gearbox.
To get the rack shimmed I had to fix the slop in the pinion. I also made new worm bearings whilst I was in there, and a few other bearings.

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