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Looking for ideas on antique tool repair

rimcanyon

Diamond
Joined
Sep 28, 2002
Location
Salinas, CA USA
Making invisible repairs on Stanley planes is a specialized skill. There used to be a guy in the Pacific Northwest who could do it, so people would send their Stanley #1's to him for repair. He charged a fair amount for it. No idea what his name is, or if he is still in business, but perhaps someone else will reply with that information.
 

dgfoster

Diamond
Joined
Jun 14, 2008
Location
Bellingham, WA
Making invisible repairs on Stanley planes is a specialized skill. There used to be a guy in the Pacific Northwest who could do it, so people would send their Stanley #1's to him for repair. He charged a fair amount for it. No idea what his name is, or if he is still in business, but perhaps someone else will reply with that information.

I suspect you are thinking of Cast Iron Mike. I've yet to meet him but he is a local legend.

[h=1][/h]
Cast Iron Repair
Specialists

Welder in Marysville

16129 Smokey Point Boulevard, Marysville, WA

Denis......................................................................................................
 
Don’t know if you’ve liquid nitrogen handy, you could freeze the plug and drop into a heated, reamed hole, doubt it would drop out

So if you were able to maintain the 500F delta at assembly (-320 F/ + 180F)
At 3/16" the interference would be .00056".
Prolly won't split the thin Satanley casting?
But will probably require burnishing anyway to cover the edge visuals.
Why bother?

I might use a taper pin reamer (in the planes like i posted a photo of, the bronze is taper reamed to help lock the sole on, when the round ductile pegs are peined to fill. At that thickness, 3/16" bronze sides, the taper is nearly parallel anyway - it takes very little to lock metal together)
On a repair with access to both sides, I would then lightly back taper the exit edge so when the peg is burnished around that edge before filing flush, it locks from that direction as well. Just so nothing is too tight, so as not to burst the casting. Which is why i suggest not actually "riveting"; and to practice on scrap to ID the best fit, visual obscurity, and safest.

smt
 

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
....
On a repair with access to both sides, I would then lightly back taper the exit edge so when the peg is burnished around that edge before filing flush, it locks from that direction as well. Just so nothing is too tight, so as not to burst the casting. Which is why i suggest not actually "riveting"; and to practice on scrap to ID the best fit, visual obscurity, and safest.
smt

You guys are way over-thinking this. Tap the hole, drive in a setscrew, and stamp "OIL" near the screw. Done!
 
Information from a different post, stated to be about the same plane:

They did this to accommodate a larger threaded knob.
I have. Actually funny enough cannonmn and I are talking about the same piece. We have gotten advice to ream the hole and create a plug for it.

FWIW, my advice did not anticipate the added information here, that the plug will be threaded to take a tote stud. (I thought it was the typical hang hole) Hence it will have some rocking forces applied to it. As a shelf sitter, it would probably still work fine. I would double down on the taper pin ream from each side meeting in the middle. However, i begin to wonder given the stress in this area and the potential pitfalls "why bother"?

Nor did it really understand that this was for a "customer".

If the existing threads are clean, and you thread a smooth, snug fitting ductile insert, my guess is you can burnish out to mostly disappear the threads. It is tough with a threaded insert, because there is always a place on the thread ramp, where the material of either the substrate, or the plug, is -0- and will flake, or leave a slightly extended arc'd divot. I'm also starting to wonder if someone willing to pay shop rates to a couple machinists to do the work, is trying eventually to establish a much higher value to the plane.

If it's a 602C, i sort of doubt the delta is significant between as is and (bogus?) pristine. They are scarce enough someone will buy it for not much discount.
If it's a #2C, the difference is wider, but on a much smaller number, so is it better than a wash after paying for labor?
 

Cannonmn

Stainless
Joined
Jun 25, 2016
Cutting down the 20 ga. Tempered spring steel went quick, cut clear thru close to line with Dremel disc riding against a fence, on aluminum for heat sink. Took off last 1/16 in. With belt grinder, but edge was left slightly D-shaped, so got it flat with disc grinder(not shown.)
 

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Cannonmn

Stainless
Joined
Jun 25, 2016
Cutting down the 20 ga. Tempered spring steel went quick, cut clear thru close to line with Dremel disc riding against a fence, on aluminum for heat sink. Took off last 1/16 in. With belt grinder, but edge was left slightly D-shaped, so got it flat with disc grinder(not shown.)

Been on other projects but now back on the plane repair. Asked my apprentice to come up with a plan and in about 15 min. he showed me this sketch of his concept. It seems workable to me. The two bolt-looking things we make out of ductile iron we bought. The lower one has a screwdriver slot inside so we can torque it into place, mark the flute location to match existing, unscrew, cut flute portion, replace. Top plug is needed to revert female threads to 12-20 from previous owner conversion to 1/4-20. Gold threaded bit is original knob screw, 12-20. Customer gave us few junk old Stanley planes to practice on.
 

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