What's new
What's new

Low-volume tooling and prototyping jobs - mostly turning - Long-term relationship

DistElem

Plastic
Joined
May 25, 2022
Hello folks,

I'm looking for someone capable and interested in low volume tooling and/or prototyping jobs for my small engineering and manufacturing company, focused on products utilizing coaxial connectors and and the tools required for assembly thereof. This would be an opportunity for a long-term relationship, perhaps a few dozen small jobs per year for a freelance or side hustle interested in growing over time. I also do some volume work, and there may be opportunity for this individual to take some of that work if the circumstances are right for it, but my primary need at the moment is more along the lines of "freelance man/woman with a lathe".

Requirements:

1. Responsive and responsible. Someone who can follow thru and do what they promise, not leave their customer (me) hanging out to dry. Preference will go to those with good references.
2. Friendly. Business is hard enough, don't make it harder.
3. A good eye for reviewing the design of an assembly tool, and providing feedback on it's suitability for the job, or make recommendations on design improvements.
4. Ability to turn brass, phosphor bronze, and aluminum parts 0.120" to 1.5" diameter, at a minimum. Parts both larger and smaller are sometimes required, which would be an advantage. Also, ability or willingness to work with stainless (eg. 304) or BeCu (eg. C17300) could be an advantage.
5. Access to a milling machine is a huge bonus, especially if interested in doing more of our prototype work or some of our larger assembly tools.
6. Ability to work and be paid as a contractor. You could do this under your own name / sole proprietor, or I can guide you through the basics of setting up your own LLC / Federal Tax ID / W9, if you have interest in going that direction.
7. Interested in a long-term relationship, repeat work. Too much time is wasted hopping from one vendor to the next. When we find someone who works well, is fair and easy to work with, we usually stick with them.

Thank you,
Tom
 

triumph406

Titanium
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Location
ca
Hello folks,

Also, ability or willingness to work with stainless (eg. 304) or BeCu (eg. C17300) could be an advantage.

Tom

I'm more a milling shop, but even if I was more into turning I avoid BeCu like the plague. There's some who probably think it's no big deal to work with.

Last place I worked the owners wanted to machine BeCu, but had to no bid as everybody on the shop floor refused to work with it.
 

prime_mover

Plastic
Joined
Jul 3, 2017
Maybe CuTi could work for you instead of BeCu. Or depending on the mechanical characteristics you want, C63020 Nickel Aluminum Bronze or C95900 Aluminum bronze or some other material.
 
Last edited:

DistElem

Plastic
Joined
May 25, 2022
Thanks, guys. I got a good collection of a half dozen responses, all of which I have subsequently contacted. RJT and Vince, I'll PM you momentarily.

I appreciate the concerns with BeCu. I have designed and used parts made from this material for decades, but have never had to deal with the actual fabrication of those parts myself. No matter, I employ shops specifically set up to work with this material as their daily business, which is why I had really only listed ability to work with it as a possible advantage, and not a requirement. The overwhelming majority of my prototype work is in 6000-series aluminum, 100-series copper, B-16 brass, phosphor bronze, and PTFE.

But just to further the conversation on the subject, finished parts made from BeCu are considered inert and safe for contact, in my industry. I have been told by some shops that process those parts that chips and curls generated from milling and turning can be treated the same, as they can't be respirated, and skin contact is not considered an issue. They emphasize it is only the Be dust generated by abrasive operations which creates the noted health hazard. But take that for what you paid for it, this isn't my area of expertise, I'm just repeating what I've been told.

Mod's, feel free to shut this thread down, if that's what you like to do with old threads in this forum. I received a good number of replies, from some folks who seem to be very well suited to my upcoming needs, so I'll likely stop watching it, until something new comes up.

Thank you!
 








 
Top