What's new
What's new

Making a coromill 316 shank

behnod

Plastic
Joined
Jan 24, 2016
Hi.
i wanted to make some coromill 316 shanks . i think the thread is not standard one ( Like Din 103 ) .any help regarding to thread type and machining process of the thread would be appreciated .

Regards .
Behnod
 
Hi.
i wanted to make some coromill 316 shanks . i think the thread is not standard one ( Like Din 103 ) .any help regarding to thread type and machining process of the thread would be appreciated .

Regards .
Behnod

Definitely not a standard thread. I believe it has a face contact (probably precision ground), tapered thread, and also a diameter beyond the thread that is precision ground. Unfortunately, I think you'd have a hard time making it up to Sandvik quality and do it more economically than Sandvik. But I guess anything is possible if you put your mind to it!

E
 
Definitely not a standard thread. I believe it has a face contact (probably precision ground), tapered thread, and also a diameter beyond the thread that is precision ground. Unfortunately, I think you'd have a hard time making it up to Sandvik quality and do it more economically than Sandvik. But I guess anything is possible if you put your mind to it!

E

Thanks EM112358
Iscar also have the same product . i use both of them . if you look at the thread inside the shank you'll see that the shank is completely done in lathe and then brazed to carbide rod . also some is completely made from steel . i can't see grinding process on the thread inside the shank . i think the most important part is the diameter and the face in which the head fits and fixes . the tolerance of the thread is not that fit . if you loose it a bit yo'll see the clearance .
I'm thinking about making a tap for it . what do you think .?

Regards
Behnod
 
I think if Sandvik can make it, then there's probably a way for you to do it too. Just not sure how much of a headache it's going to be. Tooling companies usually like to keep their stuff proprietary by doing some "secret" little process or trick. Sandvik has done a pretty good job with keeping Capto proprietary, even though it's an open standard now, by forcing people to develop the complicated tri-lobal grinding process (which apparently not many people want to learn/develop). I fear there may be some form of this thought process in the 316 endmill design as well, but hey I could be way off, and its certainly worth a shot!

E
 
That Thread is completley ground. You will be unable to turn it, the tolerance it is manufactured to is around .001". Please post a pic if you do this....I would like to see your "Handy Work":)
 








 
Back
Top