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Metal Deck or Wood Deck for Machine Transport

sae8425

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Location
western pa
I need a more capable, multi-purpose, machinery, and mobile equipment transporting system (for my private use).

My starting point would be an older, sub-26K lb. GVW single rear axle diesel truck, plus a 30K lb. deck over trailer.

Both the truck and trailer would be configured with a flat tipping bed.

I would use removable plates to securely attach the tipping beds to the frames whenever hauling heavy items.

The truck powertrain and trailer running gear setups are immaterial to the questions raised in this thread.

The largest machine needing to be moved would likely be a 15K lb. radial arm drill.

The heaviest piece of mobile equipment needing to be moved weighs about 23K lbs.

The mobile equipment would be both steel tracked and rubber tired.

This system would be used much more for moving mobile equipment than machinery, but it MUST cope equally well with both.

I’ve found potential candidates that could be turned into suitable hauling platforms with both metal and wood deck surfaces.

The truck decks have been in the 12 to 18 foot range and the trailer beds have been in the 26 to 30 foot range.

So; which bed surface would forum members recommend (or not recommend) for my usages, and why.

Would using plywood plates between the steel items being carried and the steel deck surface provide sufficient friction?

Also, irrespective of the platform, what tie down attachment point setups do forum members prefer?

Would ‘stake’ pockets every 2 feet on all 4 sides provide enough attachment options?

Would 2 inch diameter Sch 80 tubes on 2 foot centers (spaced midway between stake pockets) be a good idea?

Would removable stake pocket inserts with swiveling eyes, able to accept both D rings and chain hooks, be worth making?

The same/similar/suitable load securing points would also be installed in the bed fields as well.

I would also incorporate provisions for a removable 25K electric winch to be mounted at either end of the hauler beds.

Many thanks to any forum member who takes the time to respond and share their insights/thoughts.
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
I would pick wood because you can more cheaply replace boards and more importantly the wood provides a degree of friction to prevent the skid or wood blocks the machine sits on from moving about, but not soo much friction that it becomes a hassle trying to slide/drag the machine off. The stakebed trucks I rented from Enterprise all had wood decks.
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
Good hardwood is now far more expensive than steel.....so Id go with a 3mm/1/8" chequerplate.....if you dont think thats enough,then go for one of the hard plates in the same thickness......Hardplate is the only deck to withstand forklift wheels ...especially solids.... are particularly destructive of truck decks......but dont worry hardplate.
 
Joined
Nov 19, 2007
Location
marysville ohio
Wood for sure. Pressure treated 2x10s work great, I have 20 years on the deck on my trailer and it is still in good condition. I have steel cross beams every 20" under the deck. I have hauled cars, lathes, Mills, and about anything else you can think of on it over the years
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
My starting point would be an older, sub-26K lb. GVW single rear axle diesel truck, plus a 30K lb. deck over trailer.

Both the truck and trailer would be configured with a flat tipping bed.

What is a "tipping bed" needed for ?
 

Bondo

Hot Rolled
Joined
May 14, 2011
Location
Bridgeton NJ
Wood is best 95% of the time.

It resists the load sliding. You can lag bolt items directly down. Easily replaceable.

I would suggest getting wood, but have some small steel plates so when a heavy piece sits directly in the worst spot on the wood trailer, that will distribute the load.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

Overland

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 19, 2017
Go to a local sawmill and get white oak. Very hard, strong and rot resistant. Not Red oak.

Do you have a CDL for those sorts of combined weights ?
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
When he said mobile equip I took that to mean a backhoe, forklift, small dozer....

Programmed via Mazatrol

Have you ever driven a "tipping flatbed" ?

I owned one for years.

not so good for mobile equipment.

And, OP want's a non-slip bed, but then wants to tip it (the truck body).

Tilting bed on a trailer is another animal, and yes, good instead of ramps, IF
the bed height is low enough.
 

Cole2534

Diamond
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
Have you ever driven a "tipping flatbed" ?

I owned one for years.

not so good for mobile equipment.

And, OP want's a non-slip bed, but then wants to tip it (the truck body).

Tilting bed on a trailer is another animal, and yes, good instead of ramps, IF
the bed height is low enough.

Tilting, tipping, wasnt aware there's a difference?

Programmed via Mazatrol
 

rons

Diamond
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Location
California, USA
I rented trailers with wood. And as best as I remember, every long trailer I've seen has wood timbers.

If you are starting with green boards then the movement will have to be considered. You don't want a board to lift up
and prevent a wheel or pipe from rolling over it. Full length boards may be the best way.

Dry wood is safe. But costs. Dried quarter sawed wood is the most stable. But costs.

That fake wood these days I know nothing about. How strong? Tensile and shear strength? But stable. Might look at that option.

I would go through the wet wood stacks and find the straightest grain boards. Less cupping that way.
Get a few extra boards to fill gaps as the boards shrink. In a year probably add another row to make up for the shrinkage.
A few spares are handy for making quick repairs or used for lever arms.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
Wood is usually the preferred choice for multiple reasons. More friction, especially when wet (wet steel can be treacherous) and you can nail down triangular wooden wheel chocks (or cleats to stop machinery from sliding). The factory ships Hysters to the dealerships that way.

Best arrangement is strong steel substructure with wood decking except at the outer edges, which should have numerous grab slots (work similar to a grab hook) for tie-down chains.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
On the flatbed truck ?

No, they are common on trailers but the only flatbed trucks I've ever seen that tilted had elaborate hydraulics that first extended the bed and then allowed it to be tilted. These were custom built for a company that routinely transported lift trucks and heavy equipment.

I don't think a pure tilting bead on a truck would be very practical.
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
No, they are common on trailers but the only flatbed trucks I've ever seen that tilted had elaborate hydraulics that first extended the bed and then allowed it to be tilted. These were custom built for a company that routinely transported lift trucks and heavy equipment.

I don't think a pure tilting bead on a truck would be very practical.

Eggzachary.

Also, a "tilt bed truck" (rollback), extends out pretty far past the rear axle, even when retracted.
Not good for hauling a large trailer back there at the same time.

Granted, someone might post a pick of a single axle 20' rollback truck with a 10 ton tag trailer hooked on behind, but I've not seen one as of yet.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
Eggzachary.

Also, a "tilt bed truck" (rollback), extends out pretty far past the rear axle, even when retracted.
Not good for hauling a large trailer back there at the same time.

Granted, someone might post a pick of a single axle 20' rollback truck with a 10 ton tag trailer hooked on behind, but I've not seen one as of yet.

Yes, thank you, rollback is the correct term I couldn't remember. And I never heard of one also hauling a trailer. I think the OP's wishes for such a combo are not realistic. I've seen one or the other in use but never as a combo.
 








 
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