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Methodologies for one-off gears in an antique home shop

PeteM

Diamond
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Location
West Coast, USA
A Geared Dividing Head for Lathe, this is part of the Master Lathe Converter . . .

Later versions of this were the "Versa Mill." Between the mill portion sitting on the saddle and the dividing head locked into the back of a lathe spindle, it's a very convenient and effective setup for cutting spur gears. Same options, as above, for the cutter - ranging from a single point tool ground to shape to the proper gear cutter.

Takes up a whole lot less space than even the smallest K&T.
 

thermite

Diamond
What are your guys' thoughts?
Kludge your own gears? Pure guess, but you have run out of cheaper, faster, more rewarding ways to masturbate?

:)

Are compact, affordable indexing heads available to fit my single-slot mill and/or shaper that I'm not aware of?

Of course. 3" as well as 4" and on-up are cheap and dirt-common.
If you missed it, it might be because some are rotabs with provision for optional dividing plates.

That's a feature, not a bug for small mills and shapers with small budgets.
What's the best angle to approach this problem? :crazy:

When you encounter such a kludge, change the design so it utilizes stock parts. Life is too short, payback is too slow... etc.

How hard WAS that?
 

thermite

Diamond
I did NOT know those were "universal" mills.
Optional. And even then, only "somewhat" universal, the Burke #4 // B-100-4.

The fool things need - and do not HAVE (until one makes it) - a shaft extension
to space the Z-axis operating handwheel further out... so it doesn't interfere with the (CLUMSY add-on) mount for the universal table swivel.

A recycled B&S "#1 universal miller" table & partial yoke that Maynah parted-out makes for a lot better rig bolted atop the larger Quartet's table. When needed. Else not.

Otherwise, it serves the drillpress. For spacing holes, not for milling.

If a seeker has the "daylight" for it, one could stack any of several salvaged tables. All you really need from them is long axis of traverse.

The angle could be set-over by hand and clamped, no real need even of a pivot.
 

Greg Menke

Diamond
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Location
Baltimore, MD, USA
If you want to play with steppers and software and whatnot, seems like good fun and will keep you busy for a while.

Or, if you want to set up and start working on gears then a production feed mill, relevant tooling, dividing head/rotab like has been discussed then you can get busy that way too.

I recently did a 53 tooth gear for my father on my Nichols. Its not <that> big a deal to pull the table traverse lever, feed a bit, pull again and so on. Probably lots less annoying than cranking a screw feed. I cut all the teeth in an hour so so- this gear was AL, have done previous smaller ones in steel, more passes of course. I almost scrapped my father's gear by screwing up the indexing on one tooth... win some lose some but he got to tease me over it, so thats fine :)

I get way more than enough software control stuff at work- cozying up to the machines with nothing more than a machinerys handbook and a calculator is just my speed. Wouldn't mind learning about and making gears via CNC but if so then I want real CNC stuff even if its a couple generations old.
 

JackHB

Aluminum
Joined
May 29, 2021
Here's a shot of the kludge hobber on a Stark lathe as documented elsewhere on this site.

IMG_20211017_145349~2.jpg
 

Just a Sparky

Hot Rolled
Joined
May 2, 2020
Location
Minnesota
I did NOT know those were "universal" mills.

Some of them have the adjustable table, some don't. I think it was an option. AFAIK they all have non-reversible power feed though. Normally via cone pulleys, but the one pictured appears to be a home-job gear drive.

The fool things need - and do not HAVE (until one makes it) - a shaft extension
to space the Z-axis operating handwheel further out... so it doesn't interfere with the (CLUMSY add-on) mount for the universal table swivel.

Yep.
 








 
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