What's new
What's new

Milling an inverted V way

Dave123

Plastic
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
I have a need to mill an inverted V on the bottom of my lathe saddle way.
Being a Colchester the V is 80 degrees, which makes it difficult to use a traditional end mill and tilt the head. Problem is the end face of the cutter will hit the opposing face of the V.

One idea i had is to use a 90 degree chamfer tool or inverted V milling cutter and have it reground to 80 degrees,....I doubt if an 80 deg cutter is available.

I would really like to be able to mill both faces of the v way without having to remove the work, flip it 180 degrees and set up again.

Has any one gone through this procedure? and what tool did you use?

Dave
 

Illinoyance

Stainless
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
I used an M A Ford 6 flute carbide countersink to mill a v groove. The countersink did not have a sharp point so I needed to start with a relief groove.
 

sfriedberg

Diamond
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Location
Oregon, USA
A double-angle cutter on a horizontal mill would be my choice, buying or regrinding a cutter for the desired 80° angle. Second choice would be to use a shaper with sufficiently long stroke.
 

Joe Gwinn

Stainless
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
Boston, MA area
Conical Tool Co (available by special order through MSC) can make a suitable cutter for a vertical mill.

I bought a 70 degree included angle cutter to match the V-ways of a Clausing 5900-series lathe.
 

Mcgyver

Diamond
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Location
Toronto
at the risk of being pedantic, an inverted V has the V upside down sticking up, like most lathes have. I assume you mean milling a V shaped trough?
 

Dave123

Plastic
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
So far, I have purchased a 6 flute HSS 82 degree cutter and had it ground to 80 degs.
This did not work so good, a lot of vibration in the tool.
I suspect the ground finish is not concentric.
Next step is to try and source an 80 deg cutter from the suppliers provided above, or purchase another 82 deg cutter and have it ground at a different shop. Think I'll try carbide this time.

Dave
 

AlfaGTA

Diamond
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Location
Benicia California USA
If its just this one job, I would grind a HSS tool blank and fly cut the angle....Especially if you already have most of the material removed by your reground cutter.
Light cuts, keep the edge sharp. Sharpen the edge on T&C grinder or surface grinder to get proper angle and straight edge.
Cheers Ross
 

4GSR

Diamond
Joined
Jan 25, 2005
Location
Victoria, Texas, USA
I would cut it with the 82° cutter. That would be a 1° error that wouldn't take much to scrape in when fitting the slide to the bed. You are going to scrape and fit it? Aren't you?
 

Dave123

Plastic
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
I wouldn't do this any other way than to dress a wheel and grind it.
I opted to buy an 80 degree carbide end mill which I had reground to 80 degs.
Very happy with the results,…if anyone is looking for an 80 deg countersink .I can help
 








 
Top