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Milling durabar- Drum filter conveyor or standard?

ManualEd

Stainless
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Oct 13, 2014
Location
Kelowna, Canada
I'm pricing out a VMC, and will likely be doing 50% durabar cast iron parts, 40% steel, and 10% aluminum. (Small chance of adding ~5-8k lbs of aluminum removal/year if one job pans out)

While I've read that Durabar produces actual chips rather than gets atomized like garbage grey cast iron, I'd prefer to run coolant when possible to minimize any other dust.

Is a drum conveyor worth the money if you machine cast iron?
Does it work to filter out any of the dust, or is it more worthwhile to go for a standard conveyor?

Thanks!
 
It might not be a bad idea to just get a used vmc to muck up with the cast iron and forget even attempting to filter the coolant. Going that route isn’t for everyone though.

The turbo systems drums are only 40 micron. Not sure what the other conveyor brands are running but probably similar. 40 micron will not get the sludge out but works great for aluminum and other fines.
 
No matter what you do, the machine will be full of ductile iron "mud"- coolant filter will help but its not going to be a 100% solution. You may get "chips", but they come with the dust and its just the nature of the beast.
Which, to be fair, I definitely prefer to ductile iron mud in my lungs.

Do magnetic drum scrapers like grinders have work for catching the cast iron sludge before it makes it back to the tank?
 
Drum filters are typically for aluminum and plastics where chips float or stick to a hinge belt.

They work well with cast iron too, but perhaps not in the way you're thinking. Durabar ductile iron chips nicely but still produces dust. The drum filter does not filter out this dust, which is actually a good thing, because if it did, your filters would clog very quickly.

We had a machine with an LNS MF conveyor (belt type with filter). The standard 250 micron filter clogged frequently running cast iron. Switching to a 500 micron was the solution.

As for the dust in the tank, that's just something you'll have to deal with. It won't wreck your machine. It'll just make it dirty. Forever.
 
what about this?
has anyone used it yet? makes sense but would need to be placed accordingly or have coolant hit it to work best.
A local sawmill has a similar setup on their knife grinder. Coolant flows over it before returning to tank.
It removes a LOT of gunk from suspension in a week.

I cant see why it wouldn't work for cast iron fines.
 
For cast iron dust you want a paper filter band of some sort, one that automatically indexes the filter after so many run hours. No conveyor is going to get all the mud out. Only thing maybe close is the Drum+Scraper+Hinge conveyor that Okuma offers.
 
Drum filters are typically for aluminum and plastics where chips float or stick to a hinge belt.

They work well with cast iron too, but perhaps not in the way you're thinking. Durabar ductile iron chips nicely but still produces dust. The drum filter does not filter out this dust, which is actually a good thing, because if it did, your filters would clog very quickly.

We had a machine with an LNS MF conveyor (belt type with filter). The standard 250 micron filter clogged frequently running cast iron. Switching to a 500 micron was the solution.

As for the dust in the tank, that's just something you'll have to deal with. It won't wreck your machine. It'll just make it dirty. Forever.
Interesting. I thought conveyors with filters were all the permanent drum style filter.
Did increasing the conveyor filter to 500 micron affect how quickly your coolant pump filters clogged up, or did everything smaller fall out of suspension before the coolant pump?

Have you tried any of the magnetic separator filters many grinders use, on your mills running cast iron?
 
I'm pricing out a VMC, and will likely be doing 50% durabar cast iron parts, 40% steel, and 10% aluminum. (Small chance of adding ~5-8k lbs of aluminum removal/year if one job pans out)

While I've read that Durabar produces actual chips rather than gets atomized like garbage grey cast iron, I'd prefer to run coolant when possible to minimize any other dust.

Is a drum conveyor worth the money if you machine cast iron?
Does it work to filter out any of the dust, or is it more worthwhile to go for a standard conveyor?

Thanks!


"Traveling Column"!


--------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
Interesting. I thought conveyors with filters were all the permanent drum style filter.
Did increasing the conveyor filter to 500 micron affect how quickly your coolant pump filters clogged up, or did everything smaller fall out of suspension before the coolant pump?

Have you tried any of the magnetic separator filters many grinders use, on your mills running cast iron?
It helps but won't completely solve your problems.

We have two Okamoto CNC grinders with two-stage mag separators and paper filters. The tanks still have sludge on the walls.
 
Would it possibly be worth pumping the coolant and mud through a filter before it goes into the storage tank? I have done this on a few machines where the coolant comes out of the machine and the biggest chips get filtered out, say a conveyor, then what gets past those filters gets pumped through finer filters before going into a storage tank that the pump for the machine pulled from. The nice part of this is the coolant that gets pumped through your machine will be as clean as you want it. Sure you still have to deal with filters but at least you don't have to clean out your tank, unless you have your first tank deliberately settle some of the fines out and is easy to clean to reduce the load on your filters. What filters to use depends on what exactly it is filtering and you may want to stage it.

I just cleaned 20 gallons of chips out of my Brother's tank. This is something I haven't done in over 20 years because I have used coolant systems of my own design that I am speaking of. In time I will do the same for the Brother incorporating a chip auger.
 
Brothers use those spun yarn cartridge filters for the spindle taper wash.

Ours gets clogged every month or two running aluminum only. 20 micron or thereabouts.

It would probably be much worse with cast iron, especially since 20 micron is insufficient and you've have to go down to around 5 or even 1.
 
I think Brother filters are 50 micron and anything finer may/most likely will strip the coolant out of your coolant water. I do need to call the tech about this and will update when I start this project. It was just a thought as I had to come up with a system to deal with the swarf when I was machining stone, quartz, and ceramic and the problems sounded similar. There I filtered to sub-micron to get the coolant clear.
 
Rather than go through all this filter BS, what you should likely get is a small centrifuge to put inline.
Many of your coolant recycle units employ one in their system.

It would be the same as a continuous chip spinner, except the opposite with a different shaped bowl, with a lip on it as I understand it. I own one, but don't have possession yet. (could be a while yet)

If all of your coolant went through that before dumping back into the mill, you would at least keep it limited to what is in the machine, and not continue to recycle liquid dust.

Mayfran
Prab
Eriez


I have not opperated one like this yet, but I would expect that this would keep the perishables way down.
(filter socks, or scroll filter paper)

1692484911986.png
--------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
Rather than go through all this filter BS, what you should likely get is a small centrifuge to put inline.
Many of your coolant recycle units employ one in their system.

It would be the same as a continuous chip spinner, except the opposite with a different shaped bowl, with a lip on it as I understand it. I own one, but don't have possession yet. (could be a while yet)

If all of your coolant went through that before dumping back into the mill, you would at least keep it limited to what is in the machine, and not continue to recycle liquid dust.

Mayfran
Prab
Eriez


I have not opperated one like this yet, but I would expect that this would keep the perishables way down.
(filter socks, or scroll filter paper)

View attachment 405795
--------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
Interesting and how much $? One of these is an option on Brothers with TSC. I think you would want a media filter after it.
 
For cast iron dust you want a paper filter band of some sort, one that automatically indexes the filter after so many run hours. No conveyor is going to get all the mud out. Only thing maybe close is the Drum+Scraper+Hinge conveyor that Okuma offers.
All the indexing paper filters I’ve seen operate on a float switch rather than timer. When it gets too full the coolant puddles up a bit and it indexes.
 








 
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