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Modelling thermoform 'drape'... How can I do this???

I like the look of the Kydex sheaths you're making - nice work. I'd feel a lot better about a knife in a Kydex sheath than I would with a 3D printed part hanging on my belt.
I would be willing to 3D scan one for you in exchange for info on thermoforming temperatures and pressures that are currently working for you. We did a large cutting and assembly project with Kydex a couple of years back and there was some discussion of making some fairly large scale thermoformed parts for the same customer. We have a 200 ton 60" x 144" heated press and have thermoformed Corian (polyester) and acrylic, but not Kydex. I'd like to get a head start on the process before I'm staring at a quote request.
If you want the part scanned I'd be using a Creaform GoScan 50 (you can look up the specs online and determine if it's accurate enough), and I would likely need to prime the part matte white or grey for best results. The scan only takes minutes... processing the data on the other hand, can be a lot more work - but that would be your deal, not mine.
PM me if you want to mail me a part to scan.
 
Hey Aaron, if you wanted to take Martin Berryman up on of the offer of a 3D scan, it would be neat if you could also form some generic shapes, like just over a square piece of 1/4 or 3/8 metal. If you were able to release such a 3D scan we could all mess around with Solidworks, Rhino and the like and see if we can reproduce the shape. That kydex stuff seems pretty handy.
 
rcoope;That kydex stuff seems pretty handy.[/QUOTE said:
To give you persepctive if you're not familiar with the material, they make the interior finish of a lot of aircraft out of Kydex - including the thermoformed returns back to the windows. I've had many a nap leaned up against a Kydex panel
 
To give you persepctive if you're not familiar with the material, they make the interior finish of a lot of aircraft out of Kydex - including the thermoformed returns back to the windows. I've had many a nap leaned up against a Kydex panel

I totally did not know that. I'm a window seat guy myself and have definitely had some of those naps!
 
I like the look of the Kydex sheaths you're making - nice work. I'd feel a lot better about a knife in a Kydex sheath than I would with a 3D printed part hanging on my belt.
I would be willing to 3D scan one for you in exchange for info on thermoforming temperatures and pressures that are currently working for you. We did a large cutting and assembly project with Kydex a couple of years back and there was some discussion of making some fairly large scale thermoformed parts for the same customer. We have a 200 ton 60" x 144" heated press and have thermoformed Corian (polyester) and acrylic, but not Kydex. I'd like to get a head start on the process before I'm staring at a quote request.
If you want the part scanned I'd be using a Creaform GoScan 50 (you can look up the specs online and determine if it's accurate enough), and I would likely need to prime the part matte white or grey for best results. The scan only takes minutes... processing the data on the other hand, can be a lot more work - but that would be your deal, not mine.
PM me if you want to mail me a part to scan.


You need to work a discount on one of his knives, too. I've often thought about asking him about a PM member discount :D
 
If you do end up scanning, download a trial of Geomagic. It will allow you to get the most from your scan. Quicky removes noise from the scan, simplifies the model and creates a solid model in a few minutes.
 
Agreed - mostly. We use Geomagic DesignX but more for our Surphaser terrestrial scanner - it is awesome software, particularly when you're registering many scans and billions of points in a large cloud. I'm not the world's most accomplished user, but there's not much I can do in DesignX in a "few minutes"...
 
Yea, I'm not by any means an expert on Geomagic. But with the relatively smaller scans (less than 10"x10"x10") I can go across the toolbar in Geomagic removing noise, simplifying the model (if needed) and generating a solid model in 5 minutes. I'm not using 10% of Geomagic's power. I'd imagine the scan size and quality has a drastic effect on processing time. All I know is Geomagic makes my life wayyyyy easier.
 
Are you starting with a mesh or a pointcloud?
Are you modeling the part using DesignX scan to CAD tools, or auto-surfacing it and using the resulting surfaces as a model? I suspect I am missing something and would love an easier / faster path to CAD solids that we can then apply CAM strategies to. One of the fun projects I'm working on right now is making some moulds for carbon fibre brake ducting, and converting scans of C5 Corvette suspension components to solid models. Any helps is much appreciated.
 
That's an interesting question. It's a bit exotic for traditional FEA as the displacements are very large, but there are some new platforms out there that are much much better at soft materials as well as thin sections. e.g Dassault has something in their 3D Cloud application, whatever it's called.
Its just a non-linear FEM, lots of solvers out there that will do it, Abaqus, Nastran, Ansys or Optistruct. You'd need good non-linear material properties though to do it, which might be hard to find.
 








 
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