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My first New Machine Day!!!!!!!! And it's an R650!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

DavidScott

Titanium
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Washington
This has been a loooong time coming but I finally got enough work to force it. I work from home with enough of a dirt driveway that I couldn't get it in here about 5 months of the year because it's too soft, and still had trouble with the forklift sinking in front of my shop. This is also a bit belated as this happened almost a month ago, I just haven't had time, still don't, to post this. Lots of firsts, including probe and tool setter. Since the install was done on 5/27 I have only had it turned on for 8 days, which includes a day of training, so I am not getting to play with it as much as I want. When I get a chance I will do a review thread showing it off, it is a rather interesting machine with some rather interesting "features". The only surprises so far is it doesn't use I, J, and K for peck drilling and the demo tool setter could only touch tools off that were 3.4" from gauge line or longer. After I purchased the package Yamazen stopped selling Metrol so I got a demo unit. Taller risers may have been available new but being a demo unit I get what there is, of course I find this out after it's installed. The R650 spindle only gets within 9.8" from the table top, a bit higher than others. Oh well, I have to get the Kitamura fired up so I can make some parts needed NOW so the rest will have to wait. I can't use the Brother because I don't have the vise risers done to get the vises high enough to actually reach. Oh, and the Kitamura got its panties in a twist over the move and I can't communicate with it, and no time to mess with it now.

Yeah, it's a tight fit. Photos are before the Kitamura got put back in, as well as everything else.

Options:
22 tools
16k CTSI BBT Spindle
Manual Pulse Generator
Mode BII
Spindle Override
Outer index switch
2 Brother rollerdrive rotaries
Renishaw probe
Metrol tool setter
Lights and hand sprayer I set up myself.
 

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Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
Very nice!

If you ever need to do that outside of the summer months use a Telehandler. That's what they're built for.

I have rigged VMC's and CNC lathes up to 10K lbs through muddy fields, through a pond, over a stream with an 8K Skytrak.
 

Mtndew

Diamond
Joined
Jun 7, 2012
Location
Michigan
Congrats! Man that is a tight fit!
Brothers can be loud when they cut, I would highly suggest getting some sound dampening pads for your walls since it's such a small area.
 

BROTHERFRANK

Stainless
Joined
Dec 20, 2013
Location
SoCal
Congratulations! The R650 is a super productive beast. Great shots of it coming up the road and into your shop. You can move the Metrol probe higher either by adding a perch for it on your vise risers, or by making a custom taller stand or even mounting it on the rotary table casting with a custom bracket if they will be there permanently. If you need to touch off shorter tools in the meantime, you can place a 1-2-3 block or other precise block on top of the probe when tool setting. After setting those shorter tools, subtract the thickness of the block from the measured tool offset.
 

Cole2534

Diamond
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
Very nice!

If you ever need to do that outside of the summer months use a Telehandler. That's what they're built for.

I have rigged VMC's and CNC lathes up to 10K lbs through muddy fields, through a pond, over a stream with an 8K Skytrak.
Concur! The leveling features are also very nice.
 

DavidScott

Titanium
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Washington
I don't think a telehandler would get make it to my shop. There is a sharp turn between the lilacs and carport that the forklift just makes.

It will probably be a while before I will be running it full tilt so hopefully the noise won't be too bad. Most of my parts are simple so swapping them in the fixtures will be what limits how fast I run. No need to have the machine done a minute before I can get the parts swapped. I have been wondering how noisy it will be swapping parts in the metal box right in front of the spindle.

A new riser is one of the first parts I made for it, now I need to get the vises mounted higher so those stubby tools can reach the part.

Videos will come with the review thread, but it will have to wait. I need to get the rotaries set up to use my fixtures ASAP, as I am already sure that order will be late.
 

Pete Deal

Stainless
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Location
Morgantown, WV
Congrats! Very excited for you. I have a military surplus skytrak and it is the ticket for these applications.

The tooling up is hard to make time for. I can certainly relate to that.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
I don't think a telehandler would get make it to my shop. There is a sharp turn between the lilacs and carport that the forklift just makes.

It will probably be a while before I will be running it full tilt so hopefully the noise won't be too bad. Most of my parts are simple so swapping them in the fixtures will be what limits how fast I run. No need to have the machine done a minute before I can get the parts swapped. I have been wondering how noisy it will be swapping parts in the metal box right in front of the spindle.

A new riser is one of the first parts I made for it, now I need to get the vises mounted higher so those stubby tools can reach the part.

Videos will come with the review thread, but it will have to wait. I need to get the rotaries set up to use my fixtures ASAP, as I am already sure that order will be late.

Most decent telehandlers have multiple steering modes. You can turn a telehandler around inside it's own length. They do conventional steering, dual front/rear steer and crab. Depending on what position the tires are in when you switch modes you can get some interesting steering behavior for weird places. The real nice thing about using a telehandler on uneven ground instead of a forklift is you can tilt the entire chassis to correct for the angle of the dirt. The fancier models also have a wrist at the end of the boom so you can tilt and swivel the load. This is really handy for getting around corners because you can steer the load right around the corner. It's also super handy for long stuff.

I have a couple forklifts and I rent an 8K Skytrak a few times a year. I have yet to get it light on the ass end and I've picked and boomed several loads around 10K with it. Telehandlers are neat.
 

DavidScott

Titanium
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Washington
I finally got the first production parts coming off the machine a few days ago so I made some videos showing the machine working and one of me swapping parts. It certainly isn't going as fast as it can, I stopped working on the programs once the machine was faster at making the parts than I am at swapping them. This setup is fairly poor, I am simply clamping my old pallets in the vises. The biggest problem is both the wedge clamps and how I am holding them in the vises bow the pallets. I hope this is the only run I have to do this way. Here are the videos:




Here are some photos showing what I have done and some of the interesting details about this machine.

First is my operating station, all tools and a place to put the parts from op1 in preparation for loading for op2. I forgot about the hammer so it just sits on the shelf for now. The shelf was just a "hurry up and get it working" deal and needs to be redone.

Second shows the new riser for the toolsetter and the vise risers to reach the spindle. I can not hit the vise without jaws with a Maritool stubby sidelock holder. This is the first machine that I think holds the parts too high when swapping, I almost want a pallet to stand on.

Third photo shows what the machine looks like under the ways. Good chip evacuation.

Fourth photo shows the bottom and mount of the rotating table and the fith photo shows the tool changer and back of the working area. The tool changer is different and a pain in the ass to load stubby tool holders into.
 

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Superbowl

Cast Iron
Joined
Feb 12, 2020
That short cycle time keeps you humping like an assembly line worker. I hope it is very profitable for all that effort.
 

Pete Deal

Stainless
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Location
Morgantown, WV
Very nice! Man your vises are up there. Does that machine have a column riser in it or is that typical? In my two Brothers I don't need anywhere near that much rise to do everything I need to. My older machine came to me with a column riser and that one would have needed the vises to really be on stilts which is why I removed it.
 

DavidScott

Titanium
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Washington
The R650 spindle gage line is 9.8" above the table. They are not any higher than they need to be.

One of the rotaries is sitting on the first part. Here is a photo of the first production parts. This is typical of what I now make, boringly simple.


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LOTT

Hot Rolled
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
David, what make and model of driver is that? We have a pneumatic one that is similar, but is much bigger and chunkier than yours seems to be.

Also, have you looked at Orange Vise Delta pallets? We use a lot of pallets just like that, and the Delta setup is super convenient.
 

DavidScott

Titanium
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Location
Washington
Hi LOTT, the pneumatic drivers I use are Uryu sold here by Aimco. I have quite a few now in 4 different sizes. They retail for around $1000 but sell on Ebay used down to $30 in good to near new shape. Get them with part #s ending in 08 to 11, which is the rpms. The faster they are the less torque. I have used a few brands of these drivers but feel Uryus are significantly nicer. Aimco is in Portland, you can download the manuals online and order pretty much any part needed. Try searching "Uryu/Aimco Inline Pneumatic Screwdriver" on Ebay to see what is available.

I like to design my own pallets. The ones in the video are around 6 years old and made for a vacuum receiver which is much older. Now that I have a rotating table the pallets will stay put on the table, opening up new design options. I have new receivers designed and the aluminum bars on hand, I just don't have the time to make them yet. I also have new fixtures with pneumatic clamping designed and the materials on hand, but still no time to make use of them yet.
 
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MwTech Inc

Titanium
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Location
Fishersville VA
David
Congrats on the new toy but my main "Thanks to you" was posting the videos and showing that Uryu driver.
Soon as I saw that I bought one off Ebay (low cost :D) and these things are the cat meow!
Perfect for the Ok vises on my one fixture.
 








 
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