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Need help regarding stamping 29 gauge steel

mikeslag

Plastic
Joined
May 6, 2024
Location
Texas
Hello everyone, new guy here and I'm not a machinist. I am in printing and die cutting and I have gotten a request from a customer that needs 1.3 million parts 1.375" x 3.25" cut from 29-gauge steel sheets. I cannot die cut these and have checked with a metal stamping company near me (in Dallas), and they told me that 29 gauge is too thin for them to work with. My questions are what type of machinery I would need to successfully fulfill this request, and barring that, would you happen to know anyone that I could farm this portion of the project out to? I'm not sure if this will be a one-time thing or something that is ongoing, so I need to look into both prospects. Thank you in advance for your help.
 
Precision Stamping:

Any metal company should be able to supply rolls of metal slit to width.

1.3 million parts 3.25 long is pretty close to a strip 350,000 feet long.

Industry uses great rolls of strip all day long.
Thank you so much for your reply. They are going to supply the material in 1' x 10' lengths, sorry that I didn't add that. I'll watch the video to see what I can glean from it.
 
You could punch die stripper, die clearances would be tight but it’s doable, or lase it , it’s thin stuff.
I read about optical encoders once, honer I think, similar thickness, they printed mask and electrochemical etch the bits, how that works I don’t know, similar to pcb manufacturing I suppose.
Mark
 
Hello everyone, new guy here and I'm not a machinist. I am in printing and die cutting and I have gotten a request from a customer that needs 1.3 million parts 1.375" x 3.25" cut from 29-gauge steel sheets. I cannot die cut these and have checked with a metal stamping company near me (in Dallas), and they told me that 29 gauge is too thin for them to work with. My questions are what type of machinery I would need to successfully fulfill this request, and barring that, would you happen to know anyone that I could farm this portion of the project out to? I'm not sure if this will be a one-time thing or something that is ongoing, so I need to look into both prospects. Thank you in advance for your help.
Your biggest problem is going to be finding someone who has stock of the material. Generally complete coils need to be purchased and slit. Some companies simply don't have the ability to work with thinner materials.

If you want to do it yourself the first make sure that you can source the material in the correct width. Get a tool room to make you a die with a roller ball cage die set then get a press with a coil feeder and you will be good to go. Setting and running a press with a feeder is pretty straight forward. Look up the calculation for press tonnage required to blank out the part. Don't forget tot factor in cleaning, handling and packaging.

Alternatively keep on googling and emailing/calling till you find someone willing and able to do it. Make sure they know what they are doing as you don't want to be deburring 1.3 million parts.
 
Source a coil that is 3.250 wide and find a shop with a shear and a feeder. Hell we have stock choppers that chop .007 material all day long.

You'll need to have access to a surface grinder to sharpen the shear often.

What kind of steel are we talkin' about here?

Mild would be cake.
 
We used to run a pair of parts for a blood testing machine of some sort. One was a rectangular cup with angled sides and a flange. The other, the 'rotor', had a couple narrow legs on it.

Both ran off coils 'slit' to width. Coil, after coil, after coil, after coil ....

I can't even estimate how many hundreds of thousands *I* personally ran as a 'kid'...

And later sharpening... and completely rebuilding the dies. Over and over ...

Don't remember the speed they ran. But both going at once in a smallish room was brutal. Even with hearing protection.

I think the presses are gone now. So a million would take a fair bit longer to run on what's there now. My brother took over all that.

No holes or corner radii would make shearing a coil slit to width/length far simpler.

As for punching .017 thick ...

.005 is pretty easy if you know what you're doing. I think we had some parts from 2 or 3 thou. Ball bearing die sets in one of the newer Federal 22's ran just fine.
 








 
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