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Need help with my new 10EE

m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
You may want to pressure wash after you get it back then dry the best you can by hand and let it bake in the sun all day. Check every nook and cranny. I understand your reasoning, but Bob has a good point.
I used to sand blast everything but machine tools, not
It is the casing.
On machined surfaces silica imbeds into the surface. If they haven't blasted it yet I would cover the ways with rubber. A couple layers of good electrical tape works as long as the guy blasting doesn't hit the tape hard.
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
You may want to pressure wash after you get it back then dry the best you can by hand and let it bake in the sun all day. Check every nook and cranny. I understand your reasoning, but Bob has a good point.
I used to sand blast everything but machine tools, not
It is the casing.
On machined surfaces silica imbeds into the surface. If they haven't blasted it yet I would cover the ways with rubber. A couple layers of good electrical tape works as long as the guy blasting doesn't hit the tape hard.
Thanks for the info. I did in deed cover the ways in duct tape before sending off.
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Hey guys, just got back in town and found these spots on the lathe. I assume it’s oil seeping through the casting? Thoughts on what it is, and how to address before I prime?
20E51658-E65C-4F04-B36F-C8E11B00FC65.jpegFB50D2B0-C530-4A9C-A0EA-BFEC01B800AC.jpegD7333F74-6A3B-4385-ADF3-91DA5430D227.jpeg
 

rakort

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 27, 2011
Location
Central Wisconsin
yup, cast iron is porous. not surprised. certainly old oil finding its way back to the surface. maybe bake it in an oven at 500 degrees for a few hours? Nope never mind, not really feasible. I'd wipe it down with some lacquer thinner and move on with some good old fashion oil based enamel that will take 2 weeks for its initial cure.
 

tailstock4

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Hey guys, just got back in town and found these spots on the lathe. I assume it’s oil seeping through the casting? Thoughts on what it is, and how to address before I prime?
View attachment 371302View attachment 371303View attachment 371304
One of the things about sand blasting is that it removes paint and filler really well but still manages to leave dirt and oil. I prefer pressure washing as this will get rid of everything that needs to be removed and with a little degreaser will remove the oil.

If that was my machine, I would still consider presoaking it with some Simple Green and pressure washing it. This will get rid of the oil, dirt and most of the imbedded sand.

At the very least I would mark all the spots of contamination. Next, I would heat the contaminated spot a little with a heat gun and then take a small wire brush and a little lacquer thinner to clean all those areas out. After this, I would give the entire casting a good washing with lacquer thinner. Whatever you do, before you go on you need to get this part right.
 

GrantGunderson

Cast Iron
Joined
Jun 4, 2021
Location
Bellingham, WA
As others have suggested I’d wipe it down with lacquer thinner multiple times. I used brake cleaner to clean some of the really stubborn oil stains. Then immediately prior to painting wipe it down again with a good oils and wax remover specifically made for painting. I had no issues with the epoxy primer doing that.
 

rakort

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 27, 2011
Location
Central Wisconsin
I think we are all semi aligned. I do like the idea of pressure washing after some efforts with solvents(lacquer thinner), brushing, etc before the final wipe down and priming.

A good oil base primer will work for you and the next owner as well. Epoxy will work equally as well (and cure quicker) but probably a little more hazardous to work with without good ventilation. I remember something in the day about isocyanates causes people and multiple generations thereafter going brain dead or something like that if proper PPE and conditions are not adhered to.
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Thanks for the feedback guys. I plan to wipe down with extra strength simple green and lacquer thinner, and then prime with Kem Kromik, with a top coat of Urethane Alkyd Enamel.
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Got the lathe painted and while it’s drying I started disassembly of the head stock.

Can someone tell me how to remove these remaining gears?

A5394BCD-11E6-4EF7-B2C9-A39C73CF4E69.jpeg

I was also able to remove the spindle. Any help on how to remove the front/front spindle bearing?
80BA88BD-3048-4865-9E12-C46FB681E3DE.jpeg

Need some help on how to remove the rear bearing as well.
DC009B26-151C-4986-84E1-5F3FE7A8185D.jpeg

And lastly, the sleeve in front of the rear bearing seems in rough shape, and honestly seems loose in the bore. Anyone have the dimensions on this part?
8C6882E4-6B4C-4C9C-A977-A58AD862D157.jpeg
 

Hobby Racer

Aluminum
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Your in luck. I just rebuilt the headstock on of the my 1942 10EE this spring so it's still fairly fresh in my memory.

From your first photo I see the set screws on the top of the forward and reverse threading gears have been removed as well as the spindle.

First remove the shift fork located between the threading gears by taking out the two cap head screws. To remove the threading gear closest to the spindle nose, find or make an object who's diameter is slightly smaller than the OD of the gear sleeve. By gentle tapping the gear sleeve OD from the spindle side it will push out into the center of headstock.

The rear threading gear and sleeve is easiest to remove after removing the rear spindle bearing. I removed the rear bearing by first taking out the sleeve in the threading gear and tapping out the rear bearing from the spindle side. This also needs an appropriately sized object to mate the rear bearing outer race. Do not tap on the bearing inner race.

Once the rear bearing is out you remove the rear facing gear and sleeve just like the front bearing and sleeve but by tapping from the rear of the spindle housing.

I did not remove the spindle bearing from my spindle shaft so I can't help much with that one. There are many threads about doing that though,
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Your in luck. I just rebuilt the headstock on of the my 1942 10EE this spring so it's still fairly fresh in my memory.

From your first photo I see the set screws on the top of the forward and reverse threading gears have been removed as well as the spindle.

First remove the shift fork located between the threading gears by taking out the two cap head screws. To remove the threading gear closest to the spindle nose, find or make an object who's diameter is slightly smaller than the OD of the gear sleeve. By gentle tapping the gear sleeve OD from the spindle side it will push out into the center of headstock.

The rear threading gear and sleeve is easiest to remove after removing the rear spindle bearing. I removed the rear bearing by first taking out the sleeve in the threading gear and tapping out the rear bearing from the spindle side. This also needs an appropriately sized object to mate the rear bearing outer race. Do not tap on the bearing inner race.

Once the rear bearing is out you remove the rear facing gear and sleeve just like the front bearing and sleeve but by tapping from the rear of the spindle housing.

I did not remove the spindle bearing from my spindle shaft so I can't help much with that one. There are many threads about doing that though,
Thanks a ton man!
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Your in luck. I just rebuilt the headstock on of the my 1942 10EE this spring so it's still fairly fresh in my memory.

From your first photo I see the set screws on the top of the forward and reverse threading gears have been removed as well as the spindle.

First remove the shift fork located between the threading gears by taking out the two cap head screws. To remove the threading gear closest to the spindle nose, find or make an object who's diameter is slightly smaller than the OD of the gear sleeve. By gentle tapping the gear sleeve OD from the spindle side it will push out into the center of headstock.

The rear threading gear and sleeve is easiest to remove after removing the rear spindle bearing. I removed the rear bearing by first taking out the sleeve in the threading gear and tapping out the rear bearing from the spindle side. This also needs an appropriately sized object to mate the rear bearing outer race. Do not tap on the bearing inner race.

Once the rear bearing is out you remove the rear facing gear and sleeve just like the front bearing and sleeve but by tapping from the rear of the spindle housing.

I did not remove the spindle bearing from my spindle shaft so I can't help much with that one. There are many threads about doing that though,
Did you replace the rear bearing? If so, could you link the one you purchased?
 

grounding

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 1, 2021
Guys, I'm doing all of this, because of a leak in the front and rear of the headstock.

FRONT HEADSTOCK LEAK
I found that the drain hole at the front of the headstock was clogged and the gasket was missing, so I'm hoping that clearing the clog and installing a gasket, will fix the front leak issue.

BACK HEADSTOCK LEAK
I believe the leak is around the spindle in the rear. My machine is missing the spindle lock. I believe this pushes up against EE-1116 to create the seal. It to is missing the gasket at EE-1031 (I think thats the number..... drawing I have is a little blurry). You think those 2 might be the culprit of the rear headstock leak?
 

Hobby Racer

Aluminum
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Guys, I'm doing all of this, because of a leak in the front and rear of the headstock.

FRONT HEADSTOCK LEAK
I found that the drain hole at the front of the headstock was clogged and the gasket was missing, so I'm hoping that clearing the clog and installing a gasket, will fix the front leak issue.

BACK HEADSTOCK LEAK
I believe the leak is around the spindle in the rear. My machine is missing the spindle lock. I believe this pushes up against EE-1116 to create the seal. It to is missing the gasket at EE-1031 (I think thats the number..... drawing I have is a little blurry). You think those 2 might be the culprit of the rear headstock leak?
I think you are on the right track. Blocked drain back passages will cause leaking. You definitely need a gasket on both the front and rear bearing covers. I'll double check mine today but I think the sling ring on the rear is held in place by the spindle lock. If that's not located correctly, oil will not be guided back to the oil return passage and leak out.
 








 
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