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Noga products

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otrlt

Guest
Has anyone used any Noga tools(made in Israel).

I just purchased a Noga NF1033 NogaFlex Magnetic Base. For approximately $100, this tool is exceptionally constructed.

I always knew that the Israelis were capable of top quality tools, but I'm quite surprised of the low price that I paid for this tool.
 

M.B. Naegle

Active member
We use their mag-bases. No complaints and they're for sure worth more than the no-name imports of similar design.
 

tnmgcarbide

New member
i guess i always assumed they were japan made . probably because of the fine quality. one knob is great.
i love my brown and sharpe in the huge green case... but having 3-4 attachments , with that many clamps
and grub screws... when you can have one knob? who wants to setup with that nonsense?
 
O

otrlt

Guest
Hello eKretz,
I had no idea that Noga has been around so long.
 

gregormarwick

Active member
I don't like Noga, and not only as an excuse to disagree with OP.

For only slightly more money than a Noga you can get a Hörger & Gässler hydraulic, which is far superior all round - much more rigid than a Noga, droops way less under it's own weight, and has a much nicer fine adjust. The hydraulic mechanism is really nice for slightly tensioning the arm while adjusting it too.

For (admittedly quite a lot) more money you can get a Swiss MPTec, which is on another level. I have three in various configurations and they are among my most prized tools that I own.
 
O

otrlt

Guest
I don't like Noga, and not only as an excuse to disagree with OP.

For only slightly more money than a Noga you can get a Hörger & Gässler hydraulic, which is far superior all round - much more rigid than a Noga, droops way less under it's own weight, and has a much nicer fine adjust. The hydraulic mechanism is really nice for slightly tensioning the arm while adjusting it too.

For (admittedly quite a lot) more money you can get a Swiss MPTec, which is on another level. I have three in various configurations and they are among my most prized tools that I own.

Thank you for your input, and I will certainly look at your suggestion.
 

GregSY

New member
I have their mag bases and also their deburring tools.


It's common for people to think Noga is Japanese as the combination of short vowel sounds and abbreviated dipthongs are linguistically associated with many names in the Japanese culture. But actually, Noga is Ancient Hebrew. It's not possible to translate exactly, but essentially it means 'he who no likey dial indicator go shakey'.
 

eKretz

Active member
I don't like Noga, and not only as an excuse to disagree with OP.

For only slightly more money than a Noga you can get a Hörger & Gässler hydraulic, which is far superior all round - much more rigid than a Noga, droops way less under it's own weight, and has a much nicer fine adjust. The hydraulic mechanism is really nice for slightly tensioning the arm while adjusting it too.

For (admittedly quite a lot) more money you can get a Swiss MPTec, which is on another level. I have three in various configurations and they are among my most prized tools that I own.

Whoa. That MPTec seems to cost almost as much as I paid for my Wells Index milling machine. While I appreciate that it may be a good bit stiffer than a Noga, the Noga is about 2 or 3 times stiffer and way easier to use than most other name brand indicator bases that cost about the same amount. And plenty good enough for me. I've never had an issue with mine staying put. I generally don't worry about inverted droop or such things so much, a spot cut and measurement do fine to take care of that. I have yet to use any type of indicator setup that has no droop, so all must be compensated for regardless.

Nonetheless, cool to learn that those are available, hadn't heard of either of them before.
 
O

otrlt

Guest
Whoa. That MPTec seems to cost almost as much as I paid for my Wells Index milling machine. While I appreciate that it may be a good bit stiffer than a Noga, the Noga is about 2 or 3 times stiffer and way easier to use than most other name brand indicator bases that cost about the same amount. And plenty good enough for me. I've never had an issue with mine staying put. I generally don't worry about inverted droop or such things so much, a spot cut and measurement do fine to take care of that. I have yet to use any type of indicator setup that has no droop, so all must be compensated for regardless.

Nonetheless, cool to learn that those are available, hadn't heard of either of them before.

Hello eKretz,
I only use Interapids, my only complaint on the Noga is they don't accommodate the 5/32" toggle shaft on the Interapids.
 

gregormarwick

Active member
Whoa. That MPTec seems to cost almost as much as I paid for my Wells Index milling machine. While I appreciate that it may be a good bit stiffer than a Noga, the Noga is about 2 or 3 times stiffer and way easier to use than most other name brand indicator bases that cost about the same amount. And plenty good enough for me. I've never had an issue with mine staying put. I generally don't worry about inverted droop or such things so much, a spot cut and measurement do fine to take care of that. I have yet to use any type of indicator setup that has no droop, so all must be compensated for regardless.

Nonetheless, cool to learn that those are available, hadn't heard of either of them before.

The MPTec just locks up like a piece of solid steel. It has needle roller thrust bearings in the locking screw so it takes very little tightening and it's just solid. And the fine adjuster on it is sensitive enough to easily zero a 2μm indicator. It's just a joy to use and worth every penny IMO.

The H&G takes a different approach with the arms being very lightweight hollow aluminium and with the lock being hydraulic there are no heavy steel operating rods inside, so there is very little sag under it's own weight. The fine adjuster on the H&G is not as nice as the MPTec, but it's still better than Noga or Fisso and it's in a different price bracket of course.

The biggest H&G I have has 500mm reach and it's really remarkable how stiff it is when locked.

When I'm really worried about droop I use my smaller MPTec with a very small ( ~3/4" dial) Mercer 5 tenths test indicator. Clamped on an angle plate and inverted you can just barely notice the needle move. I guess a tenth or maybe two at the very most. I have a couple of finer resolution test indicators but they are much physically bigger and are more affected by their own weight when inverted.

that's cool you can find those euro tools in scotland. the us vendors i know of don't carry those makes.

I've discussed these on here before, and I'm pretty certain someone had a source for the H&G in the States...

Interestingly, it was Milacron who first made me aware of the MPTec, but I'm not sure where he got his from. I want to say they had some affiliation with BIG Kaiser at some point, but not certain about that.
 

MichaelP

Active member
I have their mag bases and also their deburring tools.


It's common for people to think Noga is Japanese as the combination of short vowel sounds and abbreviated dipthongs are linguistically associated with many names in the Japanese culture. But actually, Noga is Ancient Hebrew. It's not possible to translate exactly, but essentially it means 'he who no likey dial indicator go shakey'.
:) I always suspected that Noga came from a Russian word meaning "leg".
 

plastikdreams

Active member
I use their deburring tools and the noga flex. Never had an issue with either. Other than the owner of a job shop I was at, he was the only one allowed to use the deburring tool because "he knew how to use it". Mmmmmk good lol.

I'm surprised you have just found noga, real tool makers have been using them for many many years.
 

gregormarwick

Active member
:) I always suspected that Noga came from a Russian word meaning "leg".

I didn't notice that before, but yes, "Noga" is a direct latin alphabet conversion of нога.

Something like a quarter of Israelis are fluent in Russian so that makes a lot of sense.
 








 
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