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O/T If you feel like shit, get your Thyroid checked

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
No. doctors are not always right, nor do they always have the tools needed. They may misdiagnose, they may not yet understand the disease correctly (plenty of those diseases), or there may just not be a good treatment (there are those diseases also). They are working from what they know and they may not know everything needed.
It's always worth giving the smarter doctors a shot at whatever you have, though. There is a lot of research being done. If they don't help, then move on if you wish.
I'd not discount them without trying, though. They are not all "pill doctors", and for many things, the right pills can help.
It's no more true that they don't know what they are doing, than it is that they know everything and should be trusted regardless.

In the case of the disease that started this thread, hasimoto's, that's pretty well understood. Trivial to suspect, trivial to diagnose and that's not one of the head-scratchers these days. TSH is up, free circulating thryoxin down. There's no need to resort to witch-doctoring with that one. Or, for that matter, with the other autoimmune disease, pernicious anemia. My main worry with doctors these days, is they're aging out of the activity. When they retire I've got to hunt down a new one!
 

GregSY

Diamond
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Location
Houston
I had the same urologist for over 20 years. I chose him because he was 'old', and he just got older. When he retired, they tried to hand me off to one of the young doctors who looked like he was 25. I said 'no way'. So, I switched to another one of their old doctors. Then another, when he retired a few years later. When #3 retired....I'd had enough of that practice anyway so I picked up the phone book and found a new doctor who looks like he is late 30's. He turned out to be so good I wish I'd dumped my old doctor(s) years ago. While I respect experience a great deal, I also realize that many people stop learning after a point while the younger people are still learning. In a field that has evolving technology and medicines, that's important.
 

Strostkovy

Stainless
Joined
Oct 29, 2017
I had the same urologist for over 20 years. I chose him because he was 'old', and he just got older. When he retired, they tried to hand me off to one of the young doctors who looked like he was 25. I said 'no way'. So, I switched to another one of their old doctors. Then another, when he retired a few years later. When #3 retired....I'd had enough of that practice anyway so I picked up the phone book and found a new doctor who looks like he is late 30's. He turned out to be so good I wish I'd dumped my old doctor(s) years ago. While I respect experience a great deal, I also realize that many people stop learning after a point while the younger people are still learning. In a field that has evolving technology and medicines, that's important.

I have learned that some people gain experience, while other people do the same thing for longer. Some people do things the wrong way their whole life.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
I had the same urologist for over 20 years. I chose him because he was 'old', and he just got older. When he retired, they tried to hand me off to one of the young doctors who looked like he was 25. I said 'no way'. So, I switched to another one of their old doctors. Then another, when he retired a few years later. When #3 retired....I'd had enough of that practice anyway so I picked up the phone book and found a new doctor who looks like he is late 30's. He turned out to be so good I wish I'd dumped my old doctor(s) years ago. While I respect experience a great deal, I also realize that many people stop learning after a point while the younger people are still learning. In a field that has evolving technology and medicines, that's important.

My old doctor was 70. I liked him, great guy, but he sure wasn't trying very hard. The new doctor that figured all this thyroid shit out in essentially an hour of his time is 30.
 

BoxcarPete

Stainless
Joined
Nov 30, 2018
Location
Michigan, USA
My old doctor was 70. I liked him, great guy, but he sure wasn't trying very hard. The new doctor that figured all this thyroid shit out in essentially an hour of his time is 30.

Unfortunately, that's not a unique experience. I know a gal who practically lost weight during her first pregnancy. She had known thyroid problems but (as I understand it) her doc didn't get her doses right. She gets under the purview of her OB on account of some fertility trouble, and got her thyroid meds updated every visit. Dead flat weight through the second trimester, gained maybe single digits in the third. Popped that little guy out and was below pre-baby weight day 1. Looking much better now, and pregnant with a second (no mention of fertility trouble this time).
 

rons

Diamond
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Location
California, USA
A while back I mentioned about fluoride in the drinking water. When the thyroid doesn't get enough iodine it accepts flourine instead.
Not what is intended. Something about the two elements being in the same column in the Periodic Table. Scientists (not all) believe that
this causes a dumbing-down in people. Check it out for yourself. I bought some iodine supplements that come in a bottle with a eye-dropper.
One or two drops a day. Doesn't have to be every day.

https://ptable.com/?lang=en#Properties
 
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