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Off road forklift tires? 15x19.5 highway tires.

ferrretcatcher

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 27, 2019
I have a Clark IT60N off road on road forklift that i have been looking for tires for about 5 years off and on again. One has a slow leak thats manageable but the tread is getting worn down so new tires are needed in the next few years if i can find them. On there now is a Firestone Duplex 14 ply 15x19.5 highway service tire that looks like skid loader lug style kind of. I would like something with a little lug on it so it can grip a bit off road. They need to be highway rated cause it can be driven 30mph or towed 55mph and i dont want to take a chance of blowing a skid loader NHS tire up. Has anybody found tires like this or do they even still make them? I replaced the steers about 8 years ago at $450 a tire and they were from STOA, specialty tire of america, but i didn't see the larger size i need available.
 

DaveKamp

Titanium
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Location
LeClaire, Ia
I have an IT-60, it is running some unique tires as well, for same reason. My thought (if I were to ever need to replace them) was to fit wheels that would accept tractor-trailer 'Super Single' tires in place, however, it would not have an off-road tread... but the surfaces I drive on, it seems that the off-road tread wasn't helpful enough to do the job...

While it is a novel and cool thing, I don't (and would never have need to) flat tow mine down the highway... and considering how it handles, I've never had need to use second gear, much less 3rd or 4th... :willy_nilly:
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
A friend has one of those. You'd be wise to have a loaded dump truck or heavier rig to tow it. And drive real slow.
 

BT Fabrication

Stainless
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Location
Ontario Canada
yep you aren't towing that with wheels on the ground, only on a trailer ...... just looks like standard Backhoe style tires, designed for mud and not asphalt. im sure any equipment dealer is able to find a more road quality tire if needed but won't be as good off road and can get stuck.
Transport truck tires aren't designed for that type of loading on the sidewalls. Most are $500 a piece anyways.
find a decent R-1 tire. but none recommend even anything close to 50MPH only 25 max.
 

DaveKamp

Titanium
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Location
LeClaire, Ia
The IT-60 was designed SPECIFICALLY to be flat towed this way. The mast uses bar-hanging forks, and has flip up clasps to rotate the forks and secure them to the mast. It has headlamp/taillamp assemblies on BOTH ends, with a connector at the chassis, and connection points for a tow-bar with integrated master cylinder that coupled to the lift's drive-wheel brakes. The steer axle (under the counterweight, as usual) is on svelte leaf springs AND a center pivot (mine has shock absorbers, but I think they were an add-on) and the steering knuckles have negative camber and caster so that it will self-steer around corners.

The steering valve is an open-center/non-feedback unit, that when there's no pressure from the main pump, will allow the wheels to steer themselves. The IT-60's pump, however, is a vane-type pump, so when flat-towed, that steering valve will NOT get fussy and argue with steering motion.

The IT-60's drivetrain is interesting, too... mine is a 225 Chrysler Industrial slant six, connected to a torque converter, going into a Clark-made F-N-R planetary box, which then is linked to a 4-speed Clark truck transmission, to a very stout Clark full-floating axle... with hydraulic brake cylinders on drum shoes, with a pair of very unique drive wheels and a pretty odd-size tire that has an exceptional load and speed rating. With it's four speeds, bidirectional, with neutral. The torque converter has a 'dump' circuit connected to both a round footpedal, and also to one of the two brake pedals, so you can dump and inch by just the converter, or you can foot-brake to inch, or you can foot-brake by stall. Once you get it on a large straight path, you can put it in 2nd gear and really hustle down the street. Put it in 3rd, and you can get yourself a ticket. Put it in 4th, and get a ticket at just a little off idle... but I wouldn't do that...

But the whole combination of wierdness was all by design and intention, and IIRC my owner's manual identified 55mph as the expected (but don't exceed) flat-tow velocity. The machine is about 18,000lbs, so best be in a straight truck of 26k or over GVW, and it would be wise to be pretty close to rated before hitching on this thing. I don't think I'd want it behind anything less than 32k GVWR...and at LEAST weighing 28k.

As clever as it may all seem, it isn't what I would call 'good' in terms of actual use.
My IT's mast is a 5-section collapsing cylinder, with one segment going down, the other four go up. Hydraulically clever, but loaded with seals, and heavy as heck, so it's lifting weight AND the mast CG sacrifices operational performance and rebuilding requires a second forklift or a crane to lift the cylinder OUT for service. It's a cubic money expendature. I would have preferred a simple 2-section mast good to oh... 15ft or so, rather than 35ish...

The whole steering-valve/prime mover vane pump thing is an operator's bane. IF the engine is idled down to creep gently, the vanes retract. If you're trying to raise the forks, or tilt, and steer, while at idle, you'll have either one, the other, or (most often) neither, so you end up running the load into whatever you're trying to avoid. Good part is that the vanes retracted make for VERY EASY starting of the slantie (which starts really well on frigid days), but unfortunately, the vanes stay retracted as the engine warms, so hydraulic fluid doesn't circulate, and thus, refuses to warm up... (I'm changing several things to resolve this, as cold weather ops is absolutely necessary here).

As OP mentioned, the drive tires are special. So are the steers. Off road... well... yeah, but mine has issues that make the 'off-roadability' questionable. Since tires are wide, it WILL roll over surfaces that MIGHT not be as solid as what the high-load pneumatics on my Hyster H50H demand, but with the stupid-tall mast's CG being about a foot about the ROPS, well... it isn't going to successfully navigate anything that's less flat than... oh... probably an air-force runway in South Dakota.

Mine doesn't STOP worth a crap... and it has some funky habit of hanging up just one drive tire as you're rolling along, and nobody (neither the previous owner, CLARK dealership mechanics, or I) know why.

I have gathered parts for, but haven't done yet... a 'usefulness conversion' for mine. I've got a 20k Dana 2-speed highway tractor axle, dually... with about 7:5:1 and 10:1 ratio, big simple drums with air actuators. I've got a hydrostatic motor in a transaxle casing that has geared 4 speeds and a differential, as well as the matching variable-ratio pump (all from an IH 750 combine), and for the front (steer) a Rockwell 2.5T truck steer axle. The pump is already fitted with an adapter to bolt to a Chevy engine (because I had it) that will fit inside the compartment nicely using the Chevy clutch, and a hydraulic slave cylinder to disengage the clutch. I have a proper high-speed vane pump for steering, an engine mounted low-volume hydraulic pump for accessory use and warmup circulation, and the large--volume pump coupled to the back of the big hydrostatic variable for running lift and tilt. I SHOULD be able to start it cold (with hydrostat disengaged, and steering vanes retracted, so just the small hydraulic pump as parasitic load) and allow fluid to circulate, pass engine coolant through a loop in the hydraulic tank (to get it up to operating temp in winter), and once it's warm enough to operate, release the clutch to spin the hydrostat and run the forks.

Dunno what I'm gonna do about tires, but it WON'T be highway speed, and I since the 4spd hydrostat will be good for mebbie 15mph tops, I won't have to worry about overrunning tires' speed limitations. I may just run dual or triple 19.5's with snow chains or something... but with the other end driven, mebbie I won't even need chains, eh?
 

ferrretcatcher

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 27, 2019
Mine looks just like that except i have a 10ft 3 stage mast and it only lifts to 21ft. Also has the 225 slant six i rebuilt a few years ago. Same clark forward reverse torque converter but mines got a borg warner t18t19 manual transmission in it. I've driven it in 4th gear only a few times and its about 30mph. Third gets used quite a bit travelling to the docks with my welder skid. Mine is very stable and doesn't get squirrley when driving it at higher speeds and the springs help with that too. Also has the fork holders and tow bar with a surge brake actuator tied into the main brake system that works fairly good. Right on the tow bar it says tow with prime mover of at least 18000 gvwr. Also drove a older Baker york UT60 and a Champ forklift of the same general towability but that was 25 years ago. I don't forsee me really towing it too far, less than 30 miles but i drive it quite a bit in 2nd and 3rd gear @ 15-20mph? It doesn't have a speedometer. Would a 15x19.5 NHS tire blow up at 15 to 20mph? Or would the imbalance of the tire make it so bouncy that it would be really bad driving? I can find lots of 15x19.5 NHS tires for it but not many on highway tires of that size that aren't almost smooth tread.
 

Philabuster

Diamond
Joined
Jul 12, 2006
Location
Tempe, AZ
I have a Clark IT60N off road on road forklift that i have been looking for tires for about 5 years off and on again. They need to be highway rated cause it can be driven 30mph or towed 55mph and i dont want to take a chance of blowing a skid loader NHS tire up.
Flat towing a forklift on the road is now illegal damn near everywhere because there are no active brakes to slow down such a heavy load. Iowa limits flat towing to 3,000 lbs max basically a small car behind a motorhome.
 

Ox

Diamond
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Location
West Unity, Ohio
Flat towing a forklift on the road is now illegal damn near everywhere because there are no active brakes to slow down such a heavy load. Iowa limits flat towing to 3,000 lbs max basically a small car behind a motorhome.


3K?

Jeep CJ's (and modern equivs) have been the standard for flat towing as they allow the T-case to be put into N and not tear out the tranny / etc. (unless you have an early model GM Powerglide with rear pump)

No way a CJ is gunna come in under 3000# I don't think. :eek:


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 

rbent

Stainless
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Location
Kansas
Champ CB60 lift is built about the exact same way, mine has a Perkins diesel, torque converter, F-N-R PR-1 Velvet drive gearbox, and a 4spd manual box. 6k rated lift, it weighs 12k according to the tag.
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
How do the wheels fit......studs or spider mount?.......either would be easily changed ........no towing on the road here ,not since 1945 anyway,and my 8ton fork had ex army 12.00x20 lug tyres......used to get half worn ones for as little as 50c each at the army auctions.............I also see near new lugs at the truck tyre place ,told the import forklifts are all changed out for slicks before they are sold
 

Rob F.

Diamond
Joined
Aug 5, 2012
Location
California, Central Coast

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
3K?

Jeep CJ's (and modern equivs) have been the standard for flat towing as they allow the T-case to be put into N and not tear out the tranny / etc. (unless you have an early model GM Powerglide with rear pump)

No way a CJ is gunna come in under 3000# I don't think. :eek:


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
I see the dolly's have surge brakes, am seeing them all over the place as of late, might be the reason.
 

ferrretcatcher

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 27, 2019
It has surge brakes with a breakaway cable that activates the surge brake actuator if it gets pulled away from the tow vehicle. I really don't plan on towing it though but 20mph around town happens a bit to the jobsite or gas station. Firestone has some Duraforce ND in a 15x19.5 16 ply 11400lbs rated NHS tires that I'm going to call about. I was talking to another tire guy and he said that there's a load to speed chart for most tires, less load more speed and more load less speed. The front axle won't ever see 6000lbs at 25 mph. Maybe its acceptable for 1000lbs at 25mph?
 

Ox

Diamond
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Location
West Unity, Ohio
Mr. Catcher, how tunnel visioned are you on ferrets?

We had eco-terrorists release several thousand minks from a farm last fall about 50 miles away, most were re-captured, but 10-1500 escaped capture. Now we are having chickens killed around here.

Any chance you would want to come catch some minks?
Some (many? all?) of these were white ones if that make any difference?


-------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 

ferrretcatcher

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 27, 2019
That doesn't sound good on the ferret release. Some people don't have a clue how much damage a ferret can do. I don't really have anything to do with ferrets at all. It's just a nickname i've had for 20 years cause nobody could pronounce my last name. I would think somebody could pick the white ones off pretty easily.
 








 
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