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Oil circulation pump for open bearing spindle

BHolcombe

Aluminum
Joined
Apr 15, 2019
I have recently purchased an older spindle molder. The original owner provided some sort of oil pump that I’m a bit suspicious of.

The bearings are 6212 P4 and 6209 P4 bearings.

I’m looking for an oil circulation pump made to drip oil over bearings. Something compact and made to bolt to a machine would be ideal,

I’m not sure where to start, looking through McMaster carr and Bijur hasn’t resolved it yet.

Appreciate any help!
 
Similar to the ATO pump but it has to have an adjustable return rate in addition to adjustable flow. Most of these and many of the bijur’s aren’t made to recirculate without a separate pump.

The feed rate is a drip bit it’s done through lines in the machine. The spindle has a feed at the bottom and the oil is pushed up and flows lightly over the bearings.

This seems closest from what I’ve found.
IMG_1714.png
 
Not in this case, the machine is capable of 9000rpms and with bearings at this size they will only reach those speeds if they're open cage with an oil bath.

The OEM pump is a small circulating pump that drips out a few drops per minute.
 
Most bearings - usually - require only a small amount of oil for lubrication. The oil, when provided in greater amounts, is usually there to remove heat...i.e. acting as a coolant. My guess is the OEM setup, when working properly, is adequate.
 
Most bearings - usually - require only a small amount of oil for lubrication. The oil, when provided in greater amounts, is usually there to remove heat...i.e. acting as a coolant. My guess is the OEM setup, when working properly, is adequate.
The OEM setup is long gone and the OEM won’t provide them anymore.

It was replaced by something that appears makeshift.

Given the cost of downtime once I start getting a machine going, it seems wise to get a proper setup going.

So, trying to figure out what might do it.
 
Yeah, that’s the trouble spot. It’s got to recirculate. It’s intended to be a closed loop.

Other aspects of the machine are total loss, where there are gears, and slideways.
 
You can make that ATO pump work. Just need to place it lower than the lowest bearing lubricated and plumb in a return line back to the tank. You'll have to add a bulkhead fitting to the pump tank for the return line. Use a apporiate metering unit to control the flow rate of oil to the bearings. Add a pressure gage to monitor oil pressure and place a filter on the pressure side to filter the oil before getting to the bearings.
I set up one up on a large Setco spindle that had a 50 HP motor on it. Worked like a charm. At least it did for a year or two.
 
You could use a simple drip system with a tank. Collect the extra oil in a sump and pump it up into the drip tank with a simple pump on a timer so it runs say every ten minutes. Provide an overflow outlet on the drip tank back into the sump.
Bill D
 
A standard Bijur copy manual or electric will work with a gravity return line. The Bijur type meter units will handle the flow problem. In your case you want constant flow not cyclic flow meters. The small plunger type cycle any where from 5min to 100 in x cc's per stroke. You first need to know how much flow you need. To keep a constant flow with a piston plunger unit your flow would have to be less than cycle time.
The one Hudini16 refered to in post #2 has a timer on/off so is cyclic . Some of that type are constant run and they use a small gear pump. If you are only lubing one spindle a constant run would probably heat the oil.
Some filter in the return would be wise but non restrictive
Also a small accumulator in the supply would help give a constant feed between cycles.
All this could be done reliably for under $100, you just need to know how much flow is needed, Step 1.
 
Air cilinder with some valves One electric
Sucks up the oil if the piston is at the end of stroke commanded by a reedcontact
Once piston is up and cilinder filled with oil another reedcontact is activated and puts air on the other side of the piston Then it starts pressing oil out and a flowvalve keeps the flow a simple drip as you like
This is one excample of how it could work
Plenty more to think of


Peter
 
A standard Bijur copy manual or electric will work with a gravity return line. The Bijur type meter units will handle the flow problem. In your case you want constant flow not cyclic flow meters. The small plunger type cycle any where from 5min to 100 in x cc's per stroke. You first need to know how much flow you need. To keep a constant flow with a piston plunger unit your flow would have to be less than cycle time.
The one Hudini16 refered to in post #2 has a timer on/off so is cyclic . Some of that type are constant run and they use a small gear pump. If you are only lubing one spindle a constant run would probably heat the oil.
Some filter in the return would be wise but non restrictive
Also a small accumulator in the supply would help give a constant feed between cycles.
All this could be done reliably for under $100, you just need to know how much flow is needed, Step 1.
One thing I have used is to get one of those brass drip oilers with a needle valve and sight glass. Put a return line at the upper level of the oiler cannister you chose, make it 1.5 or larger than the supply line. You now have an accumulator that will give a steady uninterupted supply. Simple and no worries about over flow and adjustable so don't have to screw with meter sizes and one of the $50 Bijur cyclic electric copies will work. Of course you will have to mount the pump below the spindle and the drip oiler above.
 
Very much appreciated. On this machine I can't mount anything above the spindle. The work table is below the spindle and so there is little access for a gravity feed between the table and the top spindle bearing.

There needs to be a drip 3x per minute at the top bearing and a restricted flow at the return so as not to empty out the spindle.

Gravity return works as I'm planning to mount the replacement pump at the same location as the original, which is below the spindle return port.

Would a Bijur surefire be appropriate for this? What type of metering valves could I use to get the flow rate down to something that will work? It's recirculating but intended to be a slow drip which has been a challenge to find so far.
 








 
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