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Old PM thread, History of 10ee

texasgeartrain

Titanium
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Location
Houston, TX
Happened to come across this ancient manuscript from 2002, from a guest user. :D :D

The only single post in the thread. So I'll quote it to save you an arduous mouse click, but the link is here:
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/...history-10ee-gospel-according-monarch-112501/

Below timeline direct from a preprinted 10ee history sheet-

1939 -First machine designed as what is now called the "old height lathe".

* 12" swing over the bed and 20" centers, with D-1-3 spindle nose
* 30 feeds from 0.001 to 0.0075 IPR (inches per spindle rev.).
* 50 thread combinations from 3 to 92 threads per inch.
* 25 to 2500 rpm infinitely variable spindle through a Sundstrand hydraulic hydrostatic drive, belted directly to the spindle.

*First machines shipped to:

S/N EE-6156 Precision Scientific Company Chicago, IL
S/N EE-6207/8 Woodward Governor Company Rockford, IL

1941 Reliance 3 HP DC motor and motor-generator set replaced the hydraulic spindle drive.

* Offered 30 to 3000 rpm, 35 to 3500 rpm and 40 to 4000 rpm speeds, accomplished by changing sheave diameters and belt lengths.
* In later years, the standard range was to become 40 to 4000 rpm.

1944 Machine redesigned to today’s "new height lathe". Actually the "old" and "new" versions were both shipped for a period of about a year starting in 1944 and continuing into 1945.

* 12.5" swing over the bed and 20" centers, with D-1-3 spindle nose
* 50 feeds from 0.0005 to 0.016 IPR (inches per spindle rev.).
* 60 thread combinations from 3 to 184 threads per inch.
* 30" centers machine was introduced. Manufactured up to 1970. Sales heavily concentrated in US government installations.

1949 Thyratron vacuum tube rectifier DC electronic drive replaced the Reliance rotating motor-generator set.

* Became better known as the "works in a drawer" drive.
* Multiple vacuum tubes were used to control the rectifier tubes.

1950 Electronic drive was redesigned and updated.


1960 Thyratron vacuum tube rectifier DC drive with a solid state control module replaced the "works in a drawer" drive.

* Was to become known as the "module drive".
* All solid state except for the thyratron rectifier tubes.
* 5 HP DC motor first used.
* Approximately 3000 units shipped with this drive.

1970 Introduced combination English/metric gearbox and English/metric screw dials at the Chicago IMTS exhibition.

* 50 English feeds from 0.0005 to 0.016 IPR.
* 50 metric feeds from 0.013 to 0.406 mm/rev.
* 60 English thread combinations from 3 to 184 threads per inch.
* 26 metric threads pitches from 0.25 to 11 mm.

1983 Entirely Solid state DC drive replaced thyratron tube drive.

*Known as the "armature regenerative spindle drive"
*5 HP DC motor remained as standard.

1995 Introduced AC Inverter type spindle drive in place of DC drive.

* 7.5 HP AC TEFC motor – standard on new machines.
* Made available for field retrofit and factory rebuilding.

1998 Optional 10HP AC Inverter drive, without 5:1 back gear reduction unit, first made available for field retrofit and factory rebuilding.

Important Note: The Monarch 10"EE has always used a flat feed belt coupling from the headstock spindle to the gearbox, whenever the machine is in the feed mode. Thus any gear impulses that might affect the outstanding finishing capability of this precision lathe are eliminated. In the threading mode, the headstock spindle is gear coupled to the gearbox.

(end of Monarch 10ee history sheet)

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

I inquired about prices on 10ee's and the number manufactured and found out the following-

*In 1946, the base price was $4,194. In 1955, it was $7,400. In 1965, it was $9,775. Today's price is $79,950 (they have one in stock :))

To see how the current price compares to past prices, I checked the consumer price index for 1965, and come up with a figure of $9,775 in 1965= $54,373 in 2002, so today's prices are not quite as high as they might seem, esp. considering the low production compared to past years.

*Approximately 8000 EE's have been shipped since 1955, but how many before that, they are not sure. Between the beginning of 1940 and the end of 1945, 28,689 lathes were shipped from the facility; a portion but not all were EE's. They have the lathe records on every machine, they just do not have them listed for easy counting.

Kudos and many thanks to Darcy Dill, Sales Manager at Monarch Lathes, for digging up this info
 

thermite

Diamond
Happened to come across this ancient manuscript from 2002, from a guest user. :D :D

The only single post in the thread. So I'll quote it to save you an arduous mouse click, but the link is here:
History of the 10ee - Gospel according to Monarch

PM has had more than one webserver, hosting location, and software change since Big Bang.

That "guest" coincidentally has the same name as the PM site founder... well maybe not just "coincidence?"

:D
 

bll230

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Location
Las Vegas
Very interesting. This description is notable to me two ways. The second machine buyer, Woodward Governer, was in Rockford, Il. Barber Colman was in Rockford. When I got interested in gear hobbers I went to Rockford to visit with the 30? 40? year BC employee who bought all of BC spare parts inventory when they went bankrupt/shut down/whatever and was running a rebuild/repair business for BC machines. He gave me history of Rockford. Amazing what an industrial powerhouse Rockford was. Now Rockford is known as the city with the worst misery index in the US.

Secondly, the price given for a 10EE in 2002, $79,000, compared to the price of the BC hobbers. In 1982 the base price for a BC 6-10 (the smaller hobber, equivalent to mine and ZK's #3) was $70,000. ($171,000 for the larger 16-16) Everyone knows that 10EEs were expensive, but they still didn't compare to the price for a gear hobber. As I have said, gears are an expensive hobby.
 

m-lud

Stainless
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Location
Missouri
Its a good timline of when changes were made over the years.. I know there a lot of stickeys on this forum but this page of information would be good for easy reference. I put in a file for my use.
The information is available but not in a simple condensed page like this.
 

old_dave

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 15, 2002
Location
Central Mother Lode, California
Very interesting. This description is notable to me two ways. The second machine buyer, Woodward Governer, was in Rockford, Il. Barber Colman was in Rockford. When I got interested in gear hobbers I went to Rockford to visit with the 30? 40? year BC employee who bought all of BC spare parts inventory when they went bankrupt/shut down/whatever and was running a rebuild/repair business for BC machines. He gave me history of Rockford. Amazing what an industrial powerhouse Rockford was. Now Rockford is known as the city with the worst misery index in the US.

That's sad. I think at one time Rockford might have rivaled Cincinnati for having the largest number of machine tool builders.

David
 

texasgeartrain

Titanium
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Location
Houston, TX
Very interesting. This description is notable to me two ways. The second machine buyer, Woodward Governer, was in Rockford, Il.

A little off topic, but funny to me as I've known, and worked with Woodward products through my career. Used heavily in marine and industrial. I've seen them more in generator controls, but also on main engines. Small world eh ? :D

EMD main engine, Woodward governor:

106.jpg

Detroit Diesel, Woodward Governor:

107.jpg

And these days, Woodward and Basler dominate in generator control panels, which are quite feature rich. Woodward's are known as Easy Gen:

105.jpg

Woodward now is main based out of Colorado, but headquarters around the world.
 

texasgeartrain

Titanium
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Location
Houston, TX
Its a good timline of when changes were made over the years.. I know there a lot of stickeys on this forum but this page of information would be good for easy reference. I put in a file for my use.
The information is available but not in a simple condensed page like this.

I agree. And I don't know much about 10ee's. But visiting this section more, I've been gaining a little info on them. Hearing "round dial" this, or another particular generation that. . .

I'm not shopping. I repeat, I am not shopping. :D :D. . .(wife leaves the room). Ok, I'm just casually browsing. Not really looking to buy today, maybe next year. :D

But I'm trying to get a handle on what may be a good choice in 10ee's or maybe a Rivett. Though brief, this timeline is kind of handy I think.
 
The timeframe for the 10EE inch/metric gearbox is off or rounded to 1970, I think the first I/M 10EE offered for sale was 1975 IMTS.

In the late 1930's Woodward was heavily involved in constant speed propeller controls for airplanes. With the war rumbles already in Asia and Europe I am sure they were a priority client.

Steve
 

rke[pler

Diamond
Joined
Feb 19, 2002
Location
Peralta, NM USA
My 10ee from 1953 is a MG drive,so Monarch made the WIAD and MG concurrently?

Yup. I think the Navy was still ordering the M/G units for a long while after the WiaD drive came out. Kind of ironic since they likely had the most C16J thyratron tubes from all their radar units.
 

jlegge

Stainless
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Location
Grayslake, IL
My best estimate is between 15,000 to 20,000 EE have been built (this is base on me counting lathe folders in 1996 and then est. the total).
 








 
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