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Ot: 2022, 2023...2024??? Toyota Tundra Engine Recall

plastikdreams

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Joined
May 31, 2011
Location
upstate nj
Seems Toyota has a new recall out #24ta07 for the 2022 2023 and not yet but possibly predicted for 2024 tundra with the v6 and non hybrid (also speculated to possibly be included in the future). https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sou...CBUQAQ&sqi=2&usg=AOvVaw1gbyUvvLmWQL1p-pXeVXOu
Seems the issue is machining debris may not have been cleared during production. The safety recall was issued may 30, but also includes dealers are to not sell current inventory.

The issue is possible engine knocking, rough running, no start, or loss of motive power while driving...almost 100k trucks are affected.

Toyota dealers won't take the affected trucks on trade, neither will other manufacturers so word has spread.

They are currently working on a solution but theory is they will be at least be replacing short blocks.

Looks like the problem causes spun bearings on the crank.

Anyone have one of the involved trucks?
 
Two months ago, I was shopping Tundras. Then I found about the engine failures. Now I'm waiting to see how this is handled.
It looks like about 1/10 of a percent failure rate with massive repair costs. It's hard to imagine how this doesn't destroy Toyota's reputation and high resale value retention.
 
It sounds like they aren't recalling the hybrids yet because the electric side won't allow a complete engine shutdown...this is only speculation though.
 
You scared me there for a second. I have a 2022 v6 Tacoma, had to go make sure that they are different engines. (they are)
 
So much for the vaunted Toyota quality machine.
The biggest recalls in recent history are the sticking accelerators (9 million cars) and the window switch fires (6.5 million cars) are going to hurt them.
 
Replacing 100k engines is gonna be an expensive venture...

Don't worry though, Hyundai just recalled another 500k cars cause the seats can catch on fire lol...another don't park in your garage or near a house warning.
 
So much for the vaunted Toyota quality machine.
The biggest recalls in recent history are the sticking accelerators (9 million cars) and the window switch fires (6.5 million cars) are going to hurt them.

Dang, I thought the sticking accelerator thing turned out to be because of people not securing their floor mats, so I went to the google machine. Turns out they had a SECOND sticking accelerator recall... Wooof
 
I've got a Tundra, but mine is the good old solid 5.7 V8, quite a few of which are on record to a million miles or right nigh on to it. There's a reason I've never wanted to buy *any* car that's just been redesigned with major changes... There are always problems that need to be ironed out. This one's pretty bad though. I wonder if the Japanese are like "wouldn't have been like this if they were still made in Japan. Damned outsourcing!" :D
 
These newer turbo engines are proving to be a problem for every manufacturer.
Long ago, I had a job that gave me the opportunity to stoop over and look through the right front wheel well at turbochargers in trucks while they were running at full power or maximum torque on a chassis dynamometer. The orange glow convinced me that I would never buy a personal vehicle with a turbocharger. Not to mention the replacement cost. I do not doubt they make economic sense on heavy trucks., but it seems to me more of an expensive gimmick on the family car.

Larry
 
Long ago, I had a job that gave me the opportunity to stoop over and look through the right front wheel well at turbochargers in trucks while they were running at full power or maximum torque on a chassis dynamometer. The orange glow convinced me that I would never buy a personal vehicle with a turbocharger. Not to mention the replacement cost. I do not doubt they make economic sense on heavy trucks., but it seems to me more of an expensive gimmick on the family car.

Larry

I like holding my right foot in it with 30k lbs gross up good grade at 40 psi and 1100 egt with my old 12 valve.

I know guys who do the same thing except 40k gross and 70 PSI. And the things do it for 300k miles.
 
My wife’s Hyundai Santa Fe was subject to a recall because of possible swarf in the engine. They determined that a certain number of engines may have swarf but within that group not all of them did. Also it was determined that some of the engines with swarf in them didn’t suffer any problems. The ones that did develop problems would start to get a knocking sound in the crankshaft bearings. The first part of the recall was to bring in your car and have a software update installed. The software would use the knock sensor to detect the knocking sound from the bearings and would leave a code and turn on the check engine light. If this happened then they would fix the problem (can’ t remember if this was replace the engine or something else.). I believe the deal was if you got the software upgrade by a certain date then they would fix the problem for as long as you owned the car. We got the update and 6 or 7 years later we still haven’t got a check engine light. I thought it was a clever solution to what could have been a very expensive recall.
 
A lot of these newer vehicles like these Tundras are now recommending 10,000Miles oil changes, which is pretty much guaranteed to increase the number of problems and engine failures, mostly when you got metal fines in there on a brand new engine.
 








 
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