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Ot: 2022, 2023...2024??? Toyota Tundra Engine Recall

Keep in mind the Germans - because they know so much - are using 15K mile oil changes. Uh-uh.

100K vehicles? Not all that many for a company like Toyota. However, It does run counter to all that we'd been told about Japanese manufacturing quality 'QA' in terms of cleanliness and measurement.

But the part that caught my eye is their refusal to take the vehicles in on trade. WTF? You'd think they'd be glad to take them in on trade - then they could rectify the engine issue, or not, and have one less problem out there on the road. Not to mention....it's the customer who get screwed, holding a vehicle they can hardly sell.
 
Toyota has messed-up the new Tundra (22+) from day one. First the styling is some kind of whacked---very polarizing and most hate it. The numbers don't lie: they're not selling very well, even before the motor recall.

Starting with the new Tundra, the TTV6 is all you can get. Toyota killed the venerable 5.7L V8 for the new "eco-friendly" twin-turbo 3.5L (derived from a proven Lexus SUV and car motor).
How's that working out for ya, 'Yota?

One interesting side effect: the previous generation Tundra (07-21) values have skyrocketed, especially later-model, low-mileage ones: selling for more than their original sticker!

The 07-21 (refreshed in 14) Tundras are excellent trucks, cavernous inside with durable materials, large brakes and axles, plenty of power (thirsty V8), along with a solid, connected driving feel.

ToolCat
 
It's worth noting that so much engine development has been for reasons not related to all the important things like power, reliability, and even reasonable efficiency. They've been done for one reason only - the retarded never-ending clamp down on emissions and MPG regulations dished out by the EPA. Can you imagine the EPA ever being reasonable and telling everyone 'Emissions are at a level that is of no significance. We've made it!' Of course not - that would mean they lose their fat salaries and power.

As for the Toyotas...I once borrowed a 4Runner from a relative to make an 8 hour drive. It was a 6 cylinder version, nothing fancy. But what was impressive it is did everything well - steered, stopped, handled, etc. It was a vehicle that you could feel connected to very easily and didn't leave you wondering 'why did they make it that way?'.
 
Time doesn't matter much with today's oils. It's probably more important how you use the vehicle when you do drive it. If you make a 1/2 mile drive then shut it off for another 4 weeks, that's bad as the condensation and other bad goo-goo don't have time to boil off. On the other hand, a good 30 mile drive at 75MPH will ensure that happens.

I only change my Kubota's oil once every 35 hours...sometimes that's almost 2 years.
 
Oil and good filters matters quite a bit with the amount of power they're trying to get out of these small blocks.

They're not stretching oil changes because oil got so much better the last 5 years, nor the engineering getting any better, they're stretching it because it's less oil waste = " greener for the environment " they don't give a crap so long as it dies 1 mile or minute after the warranty is up.
 
It's worth noting that so much engine development has been for reasons not related to all the important things like power, reliability, and even reasonable efficiency. They've been done for one reason only - the retarded never-ending clamp down on emissions and MPG regulations dished out by the EPA. Can you imagine the EPA ever being reasonable and telling everyone 'Emissions are at a level that is of no significance. We've made it!' Of course not - that would mean they lose their fat salaries and power.

As for the Toyotas...I once borrowed a 4Runner from a relative to make an 8 hour drive. It was a 6 cylinder version, nothing fancy. But what was impressive it is did everything well - steered, stopped, handled, etc. It was a vehicle that you could feel connected to very easily and didn't leave you wondering 'why did they make it that way?'.
Back in the earliest part of my engineering career, I was at Cummins in the fuel injector R&D group. One of the experienced guys told me, absent the EPA, none of us would have jobs. Cummins had figured out how to make a long-life ass-kicking engine long ago. If you broke down the engineering staff and looked at their primary tasks, the truth was obvious. In the late 90s, the particulate emissions out the stack were already substantially less than the particulates that were getting sucked into the engine--which, interestingly, has large components of tire dust, in case you ever wondered where the tread on your tires went.

I think most of us would agree a world filled with coal-rolling big-rigs isn't ideal. On the other hand, once you've solved 99.9% of a problem, getting from there to 99.99% can cost >10x as much as going from zero to three nines, and for not even a 0.1% "improvement."
 
Back in the earliest part of my engineering career, I was at Cummins in the fuel injector R&D group. One of the experienced guys told me, absent the EPA, none of us would have jobs. Cummins had figured out how to make a long-life ass-kicking engine long ago. If you broke down the engineering staff and looked at their primary tasks, the truth was obvious. In the late 90s, the particulate emissions out the stack were already substantially less than the particulates that were getting sucked into the engine--which, interestingly, has large components of tire dust, in case you ever wondered where the tread on your tires went.

I think most of us would agree a world filled with coal-rolling big-rigs isn't ideal. On the other hand, once you've solved 99.9% of a problem, getting from there to 99.99% can cost >10x as much as going from zero to three nines, and for not even a 0.1% "improvement."
If it ain't a CAT, it's a dawg :D
 
I just wonder how they got machining debris stuck in the engines.
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Boeing's built in South Carolina were refused by some customers, excessive quality issues.

My brother worked in a foundry, said a few had the philosophy:
"What's the minimum I have to do and not get fired?"

If you pretend to flush swarf, pretend to inspect, nobody's gonna know, unless they stand over you and virtually do your job for you.

You can't build a company, a country with people who just don't care. The world has showed this to be true again and again.
 
I hear that when a Russian airplane lands the passengers start clapping because they're happy that the wings didn't fall off. Here in the US, airplane manufacturers have done such a good job with reliability that we jump down their throats for the slightest problem.
 
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I think most of us would agree a world filled with coal-rolling big-rigs isn't ideal. On the other hand, once you've solved 99.9% of a problem, getting from there to 99.99% can cost >10x as much as going from zero to three nines, and for not even a 0.1% "improvement."
That's pretty much my point. Some emissions control is good - but it's no longer about what's good, it's about keeping losers employed. All those highly paid scientists ate the EPA might have to get real jobs otherwise!

As for CAT....I recently was discussing oil field (and other) compression applications with a long time compressor guy. The oil fields are full of piston engine driven compressors - fleets of thousands. The compressor guys was discussing with me what he'd been hearing in talks with the biggest of the big oil companies as they begin to electrify all of these services. i.e. convert them to electric motor drive. In his words, "I sure wouldn't want to be a CAT dealer in 5 years...."
 
Attack beef-
- Let a kine loose on BLM land, provide it with water:
> Free Food

Attack coal, attack oil, attack foundries, blow money on wars they don't even make up lies about anymore.

You'd almost think some force had come in to the West and is attempting to undermine it - from the inside
 
And some engines can run dirty.
My son worked for a major truck lease company. They would analyze the oils at oil-change time and decider if it needed changing. Some engines needed l change sooner than oil change time. And some could go twice as long.

*What year did Toyota stop building engins in Japan?
I found this: Besides 4 plants in Japan that produce engines (Kamigo, Shimoyama, Tahara and Kanda), Toyota manufacturers engines in the USA, Poland, Thailand, and the UK.
 
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Yep, those Russians have been after us forever.

Remember when they strafed and torpedoed the USS Liberty?
1718654881003.jpeg

I remember buying a new oil pump as a kid, there was casting sand in it ☹️
 








 
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