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OT - Best driveway sealer?

Rain delayed things a bit, but finally got the driveway sealed a few days ago, and since Peter (the guy who did it) now sends people to this thread, I told him I would post some feedback.

It came out really great...all nice and black again :D. It was done over 3 days...first they powerwashed it...then they trimmed back the grass, sealed cracks and patched a few spots...then they sealed it. I was there the day the trimming and cracksealing was done, and Peter's son did a great job...he was very thorough. And Peter even stopped by a few days later to check in and make sure we were satisifed.

I'm definitely glad I went this way over the coal-tar, and not just because I was convinced that ARS is better than coal-tar, but also because of the attention to detail in the prep work. We all know that the better the prep, the better the result. The coal-tar quote I got had no prep work other than blowing off the driveway. If the coal-tar people included the same level of prep work, I'm sure the quotes would have been a lot closer.

And thanks again to spangler for his guiding wisdom...

John
 
Not to steal the thread but.... I had my driveway redone. They put on top about 4-5 inches of rough asphalt. They did a nice job but it is course! They did roll it and it had not been done in 20 years. What would you put on top of this to make it more of a smooth surface???? Thanks and best regards Fred
 
Laddy

Asphalt comes in various grades based on the size of the aggregate (rocks). If the asphalt has large aggregate which gives a rough surface finish, not much can be done short of overlaying another inch or so of finer grained asphalt.

A thick mix of coal tar sealer with a heavy sand mix will fill in some of the surface roughness. New asphalt should NOT be sealcoated for at least 6 months. The oils in the asphalts need time to evaporate. If done to soon the sealer can actually crack the new asphalt. The cracks will be fine surface cracks which look like "chicken wire". Rejuvenators will not change the surface texture at all.

John

Glad it worked out for you.

Lee
 
Should I wait through the first winter before sealing?

Laddy

Asphalt comes in various grades based on the size of the aggregate (rocks). If the asphalt has large aggregate which gives a rough surface finish, not much can be done short of overlaying another inch or so of finer grained asphalt.

A thick mix of coal tar sealer with a heavy sand mix will fill in some of the surface roughness. New asphalt should NOT be sealcoated for at least 6 months. The oils in the asphalts need time to evaporate. If done to soon the sealer can actually crack the new asphalt. The cracks will be fine surface cracks which look like "chicken wire". Rejuvenators will not change the surface texture at all.

John

Glad it worked out for you.

Lee

Hi, Spangler585. I was lurking around this forum to look for tips on sealing my driveway when your post caught my attention. I just had my driveway redone with new asphalt about 3 months ago in June. I live in Northern Virginia where there can be snow and ice and lots of rain during the winter. We've just had a relatively dry and very hot summer. Should I wait until the spring to seal my driveway or should I go ahead and seal it to protect it from the rain/snow/ice and the road salt of the coming winter? I.e., what's the worser of the two evils: the risk of damage from sealing too soon (less than 6 months before winter hits) or the risk of damage from the winter rain/snow/ice/salt?
Thanks for your reply.
-Vin
 
Hi Vin

If your driveway gets a lot of direct sunlight, I would recomend one thin coat of sanded sealer now and a second coat next spring or early summer. This will slow the pentration of water this winter. Apply the second coat next summer when all chance of ground frost is gone.

Hope this helps
Lee
 
Thanks!

Hi Vin

If your driveway gets a lot of direct sunlight, I would recomend one thin coat of sanded sealer now and a second coat next spring or early summer. This will slow the pentration of water this winter. Apply the second coat next summer when all chance of ground frost is gone.

Hope this helps
Lee

Thanks for the advice, Lee. I'll go ahead and do the thin coat now and another one next summer.
Regards,
Vin
 
Tom1

"Chip and oil" or "chip seal" is when liquid asphalt is sprayed with a truck mounted distributor, covered with washed and sized gravel and then compacted with a roller. This process used to be quite common "back in the day":) It was cheap and could be done with unskilled labor. Remember Paul Newman in the movie "Cool Hand Luke".

The increase in the price of liquid asphalt, tied directly to the price of oil, has made it economically unfeasible. It needs to be redone regularly as the chips break loose and wash into the gutters. Small towns around Cincinnati did it for years. The constant recoating and traffic would eventually cause a crown to build up. The center of the street would be 12' to 18" higher than the gutters or curbs.:eek: Call in the bulldozers, scrap it level and start over.

The viability of this type of paving is intirely dependant on the underlying surface. Frost heaving can create a very rough road in short order. It may still be used in low traffic or rural areas but have not seen it in years.

Lee

8 years later, and they still do the roads here that way. They call it "tar and chip" here.....lot's of fun when you are on your motorcycle, and come around a corner onto a section that you didn't know was recently done....
 








 
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