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OT: Better then billet

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Bill D

Diamond
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Apr 1, 2004
Location
Modesto, CA USA
Coleman flashlights now brag that they have a special "battery saving technology". Marketed under the trademarked name of "Battery Guard". This high tech stuff means when the light is switched off there is NO battery drain. It comes into play automatically when the switch is moved to the off position.
Sounds like I need to go out and get all new lights with this marvelous new invention. Makes a military tactical grade billet flashlight seem old school.
Bill D
 
OMG! I have to have one... Why didnt I think of that... WTF do they mean, the switch actually turns it off? Do they expect us to believe that no off switches in the past actually worked?? Why do they think we are stupid
 
On flashlights in vehicles I normally put a piece of paper between the tailcap and battery contacts so they don't drain themselves.

That would personally be a selling point to me for cheap leave in the car lights.
 
The link doesn’t hint at the physics/method behind the technology. My guess is that they are using the switch at both the negative and positive battery terminals this minimizes the extended potential of the battery and keeps it at a lower energy state. A better visualization of this is in an automobile. The negative battery post is connected to the entire 4000# of the car. It therefore extends its 12v potential to the entire car whether the ignition is on or off. Positive does the same but to just few #s of copper wire.
 
These are probably electronic switches that only send a signal to an internal circuit board with an IC... Most of the newfangled flashlights use them so they can have variable brightness levels, etc. That means that there will still be a slight power draw even when they're "off." One way that mechanical switches are superior.
 
No drain reduces the life for many batteries. One of the first commercial IC's, the LM3909 was designed to flash an LED on aircraft flashlights to extend the battery life.
 
The link doesn’t hint at the physics/method behind the technology. My guess is that they are using the switch at both the negative and positive battery terminals this minimizes the extended potential of the battery and keeps it at a lower energy state. A better visualization of this is in an automobile. The negative battery post is connected to the entire 4000# of the car. It therefore extends its 12v potential to the entire car whether the ignition is on or off. Positive does the same but to just few #s of copper wire.
Ummm...really...?
 
Sounds like the "spray and wash" dish cleaners, or Swiffer brooms and mops. Have a simple thing? We'll make it slightly more convenient and a little more expensive at the cost of more complexity and absolute dependence on continuing supply chain support. Just take my money please!

Whatever the argument is, be it the environment, economic use of resources, social politics, etc. I'm all for people and corporations doing business however they please, but if they're trying to "sell" me something, using technology to make the simple things in life more complicated isn't going to do it.
 
Coleman flashlights now brag that they have a special "battery saving technology". Marketed under the trademarked name of "Battery Guard". This high tech stuff means when the light is switched off there is NO battery drain. It comes into play automatically when the switch is moved to the off position.
Sounds like I need to go out and get all new lights with this marvelous new invention. Makes a military tactical grade billet flashlight seem old school.
Bill D
They need to add this new tech. into cheap calipers so they stop draining the F'n battery!
 
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