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OT: Difference between Silverado Work-truck and non work-truck?

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
Silverado 2500HD Work Truck vs. LT,LT1,LT2,LTZ

Is the difference in the trim level only? And in the case of the Z71, shocks and ride height? And the LTZ has the center console dash.

Is there any difference in: load capacity, towing capacity, engine HP and Torque, structural build ?

Why are Work Trucks considerably cheaper when the interior appears to be almost as nice as a LT1 trim level.
 

Bill D

Diamond
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Location
Modesto, CA USA
For Ford trucks the Costco special work truck includes a trailer wiring plug ziptied to the bumper support, Extra transmisson oil cooler,Or maybe it is for power steering fluid. rubber floor mat not carpet, probably some other stuff like as bigger alternator and battery.
And lots of warning labels in the manual about do not use this as a ambulance or tow truck, do not idle in place for more then 5 minutes etc.
Bill D
 

Bill D

Diamond
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Location
Modesto, CA USA
Or what? Is it going to burst into flames? :mad5:

Not often but that explains all the CO levels inside the cab. The gas tank will get overheated at long idle since the exhaust is right next to it and no cooling airflow from motion. They have been known to spray fuel in the face when the cap is opened. I think they can vent and with no motion to disabate the fuel fumes they can explode if ignited by a overheated exhaust system.
Are you old enough to remember when catalytic convertors came out and people had to be warned not to park in dry grass?
Bil lD
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
Are WT (work trucks) noiser than the LT and above trim levels?
Does the WT have no sound deadening or inferior sound deadening compared to the other trim levels?
 

Sea Farmer

Diamond
Joined
Mar 25, 2006
Location
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Driving Silverado 1500 Work Trucks since 2002. As far as I know the only difference is the trim level, but haven't checked the last 2 years. Mine are always basic 2-seat cabin, 8' bed, 4WD, auto transmission. Audio system may have been upgraded the last 2 years, before that its an AM-FM radio, period. Everything else is basic, no special tow package, battery, alternator, etc. Just a no-frills truck.

On edit: I don't know about the sound insulation or noise compared to other models. Mine don't seem noisier than any other truck I've ever ridden in. At least not until after a few years, when everything has loosened on all pickups anyways :D
 

kustomizingkid

Titanium
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Location
Minnesota
As far as I am aware of its mostly trim and interior... that said the fleet truck market it very competitive, lots of companies buy on price and that might have something to do with it.
 

L Vanice

Diamond
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Location
Fort Wayne, IN
Not often but that explains all the CO levels inside the cab. The gas tank will get overheated at long idle since the exhaust is right next to it and no cooling airflow from motion. They have been known to spray fuel in the face when the cap is opened. I think they can vent and with no motion to disabate the fuel fumes they can explode if ignited by a overheated exhaust system.
Are you old enough to remember when catalytic convertors came out and people had to be warned not to park in dry grass?
Bil lD

I used to test cooling systems on light, medium and heavy trucks. There was an "idle cooling test" that was simply recording coolant and other system temperatures while the vehicle sat still with the engine running. The cooling fan would not move much air at idle speed and there was no forward motion to help move air through the radiator and under the chassis. The diesel trucks never got hot at idle. Ever notice all those running engines at a truck stop back when fuel was cheaper? The gas engine light duty trucks with 1970's emission hardware would get the coolant too hot in a matter of minutes, and the exhaust could start glowing. The company stopped making all their gas engines, first the big ones and then the small ones. In 1980, they stopped the program to build light vehicles with gas engines purchased from a major automobile manufacturer. That was the end of all our light vehicle production. Once the gas engines were gone, I never had to run another idle cooling test, so I have no idea what a current Chevy would do. But the five minute limit is suggestive. I bet the diesel versions don't have that sticker.

Larry
 








 
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