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OT- Will UPS accept a crate like this as is ? (pic)

GregSY

New member
No telling without taking it there and seeing if they do. It's dependent on the leniency of the specific person at UPS.

UPS won't like those tabs sticking up.

But even if they accept it, and damage it, they'll put up a fight over a claim no matter how it's boxed....so in that sense it's worth a try.
 

Tony Quiring

New member
The tabs bend down to close, OP knows that, easy.

Get the better thicker packing tape and just cover all sharp things and call it good.

With competition UPS is no longer picky.

We received this week 150 of the fold up cardboard bins as flat stock, just stacked and shink wrapped.

Every tire we have received (assorted lawn equipment sizes) just a label stuck to the tire.

Tape it to avoid them catching on things to damage your box.



Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

CatMan

New member
My driver would take it. And I would expect to pay handsomely for a package that big. 24 + 30 + 24 + 30 = You're into oversize territory.
 

boslab

New member
Don’t know about over there but skf used to pack bearings in those and they came fedex, sandvick also packed big face mills in the same boxes, think they used dpd and our parcel force just tape the sharps up
Mark
 

mfisher

New member
Yes, I have shipped pretty much that exact crate with UPS several times. Sometimes with an industrial pull out handle and wheels (shipping crate style roller bag, but bigger). Never had an issue.

My favorite package I have received (I think Fed-Ex, not UPS) was a new car muffler with a shipping label attached. No box at all.
 

Fish On

New member
My driver would take it. And I would expect to pay handsomely for a package that big. 24 + 30 + 24 + 30 = You're into oversize territory.

No he's not. Ups measures length plus girth - 24+8+24+8+30 - 94". Oversize would be over 165. Large package surcharge would be over 130. Additional handling (dimensions) is for packages with longest side over 48, or second longest side over 30". None of those apply, so it's just a normal package.

What they will get him for is 'additional handling, packaging/other,' for item not being fully encased in cardboard. That charge ranges from $14-17.50 depending on zone .

OP just needs to decide if it's worth wrapping it on cardboard to save $15, but it'll ship either way.
 

Fish On

New member
Oh, and stretch wrap/house wrap won't help - UPS specifically lists packages wrapped in stretch wrap as being subject to the additional handling surcharge.
 

digger doug

New member
What they will get him for is 'additional handling, packaging/other,' for item not being fully encased in cardboard. That charge ranges from $14-17.50 depending on zone .

OP just needs to decide if it's worth wrapping it on cardboard to save $15, but it'll ship either way.

McMaster has the answer....:D
Object moved
 

M.B. Naegle

New member
We have crates like that come in periodically from Europe via DHL and LTL shippers. Can't say for sure with FedEx or UPS, but I don't think it would be a problem as it's an industry standard crating system.
 

jim rozen

New member
I think they'll balk. The shap corners will dent their truck insides when the crate is hurled into it from the loading dock.
 

GregSY

New member
I receive tires all the time via UPS and they are wrapped in shrink wrap...and I am sure no one is paying extra. The reason they are only shrink wrapped is it's easier and cheaper than boxing them. I also once received an entire Dana 60 differential (4.10 gears, 35 spline Detroit Locker, minus axles) via UPS and the shipper did nothing other than adhere a label to it.
 

thermite

New member
Oh come on gray duct tape...

Yah.. really.

I "aside" those preformed paperish "Ell" shapes the majors use for "corners" on lots of new stuff. A big air-con unit the most-recent.

Item of this sort, lay a length of that angle over the sharps, glass-fiber "packing" tape it -which they LIKE - and not the "duck" tape - which they are less fond of.
 

thermite

New member
UPS actually got its start shipping unboxed tires.

No they did not.

1907 - Before they even acquired their OWN first vehicle, they delivered retail store goods to folk's homes. Small goods.

Folks seldom had a car or even a horse and buggy or a bicyle, those days. Walked. Took horse-drawn or electric street rail. Shopping could be a real chore. We still used them out of Kaufman's, Gimbels, Boggs & Buhl, "et al" Northside Pittsburgh, late 1940's onward. Same reason. No car. No bicycle, either. Walk or take the trolley.

What the Hell would folk with nary a vehicle DO with a "tire", boxed or otherwise? Use it for a softer privy seat, mayhap?

You seen the DIAMETER of tires of that era?

Not exactly a SECRET, their beginnings, onward.

United Parcel Service | History & Facts | Britannica

What next?

You going to tell us that DJ Trump was not an effective President?

Go figure yer credibility is already shot all to Hell and gone?
Just "go for it". Don't hurry back.

:(
 

jackal

New member
I received a package like that about a year ago with tooling in it.
The shipper has put some tape on the sharp edges, but basically was the same.
 
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