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Parted out a 2038 Universal Table

Martin P

Titanium
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
Germany in the middle towards the left
So I parted out the universal table I got with that FP4-60 about a year ago. The top was badly milled into and no-one wanted to buy the thing and I have a space problem (aka pack-rat problem).
I did remove the encoder a while back and now wanted to see what else might be worth keeping before I make my run to the scrap metal yard.
Taking this thing apart might be easy if you now what you are doing, but I was just guessing my way through it and it was a bit tedious.
The worm gear is adjusted against the big gear (?) by adjusting it axially. This is possible because it has a variable tooth thickness along its axis. Am I making it understandable?
Working on this was also a bit difficult because of the weight of the parts. I did not want stuff to fall on me when finally finding the last screw. And they were well hidden it seemed.
I have to say that this table in the application on an FP4-60 is borderline garbage because the tightening screws to rotate around the y axis are at the bottom, well hidden from any reach. Probably have to work with mirrors. I see guys laying on their backs squeezing in below the table to see anything at all. Also this particular table was a mess of junk, chips, crud everywhere, except for the gear and encoder areas, which have remained virgin, grease still on gears. It does not seem to ever have been moved.
Anyway, I figure some might appreciate a view rarely seen.
 

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How much, for the complete table?
Would be nice to have, on my late FP4NC ;-)
Might also put a NCT400 on there, since 4th servo amp is already inside.
 
The worm gear is adjusted against the big gear (?) by adjusting it axially. This is possible because it has a variable tooth thickness along its axis. Am I making it understandable?
That's very interesting. How far can the worm be moved? Thanks for the pics.
 
Dual lead worm gear sets are not that uncommon where there is a need to minimize backlash with a simple adjustment method. Essentially each side of the worm thread is ground with a slightly differing lead. This results in a tooth thickness that gradually tapers from one end to the other. Commonly used on gear hobber table drives as an alternative to having to move the worm/worm wheel in a radial direction to reduce backlash. Just throwing it out there for general info.
 








 
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