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Pneumatic nail gun or electric nail gun

sfriedberg

Active member
Your question is too simplistic to give an accurate answer.

"Nail gun" covers everything from guns that drive 23 gauge headless pins to guns with extended magazines that drive 3.5" long framing nails. And specialities like plastic cap nailers for attaching soft sheet goods (like felt). And there are closely related tools like staple guns. So the first thing you must consider is the specific application.

The second thing you should consider is that you've omitted an entire very important category, namely combustion-powered nail guns, typically powered by a small cartridge of butane gas. Significant brand name in this category is Paslode.

Desirable features for nail guns include
1) portability
2) power to fully drive a nail full depth in the hardest material
3) speed (especially for roofing nailers)
4) repeatability/accuracy
5) lack of misfires/jams
6) capacity to work all day
7) easy of use (reloading, unjamming, positioning, setting aside)
8) ergonomics, including weight and weight distribution
9) ease of maintenance

No drive technology (pneumatic, combustion, electric) has a dominant advantage in all these categories.

Ignoring some electric staplers, combustion guns and electric guns usually have the advantage in portability as they are cordless/hoseless.

A well-designed nail gun can drive a nail full-depth in hardwood, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made.

A well-designed nail gun can drive several nails a second, with no noticeable trigger delay, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made.

A well-designed gun drives nails to a consistent depth time after time, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made.

A well-designed gun avoids misfires and jams, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made.

Assuming no power/fuel shortage, pneumatic guns can work all day long. Electric guns need batteries, and combustion guns need fuel cartridges.

A well-designed nail gun can be reloaded and/or unjammed in seconds, without tools, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made. Positioning of pneumatic guns in tight locations can be obstructed by the hose, and in some designs of electric or combustion guns, by the position of the battery. A well-designed nail gun can be given a rafter hook or belt hook, using any of the three drive technologies, but not all guns are that well designed or made.

A well-designed nail gun is well-balanced for one-handed use, lines up the driver naturally with the line of the user's forearm, and can be held one-handed for hours. This can be done with any of the three drive technologies, but it is more difficult for electric guns due to the weight of the motor and battery pack.

A well-designed nail gun can have all typical wear parts (piston seals, driver pins, etc) quickly replaced using minimal tools. Historically this has been easiest for pneumatic guns, next easiest for combustion guns, and least easy for electric guns.

-------------

For any specific application, the best nail drive technology depends on what models the manufacturers are offering at the moment. The superiority of a nail gun is determined more by the quality and refinement of its design than by the drive technology.
 

DDoug

Active member
The electric nail guns are only for hunting spammers at close range, farther away operations,
AKA "Spammer Sniping" requires air powered weapons to transverse the far distance.
 

Scottl

Active member
Pneumatic, for the simple reason that electric nail guns may not have as consistent force. It depends on the design of the electric. A simple plunger design is sensitive to limitations on supply due to such things as long extension cords. I do believe there are some electrics that use a more complex mechanism but they would be higher priced.

For professionals, cordless nail guns are often preferred but good ones tend to be expensive.

Bottom line: Pneumatics are generally more cost effective assuming you already have a compressor.
 

woodchuckNJ

New member
without a doubt pneumatic..

more control. more power.

The battery units are catching up... but the best portable is still paslode which uses gas cartridges.

go pneu.
 

rongpeng

New member
this is also woodworking forum,right?I want to make some pallets with nail gun, but I don’t know if I should buy a pneumatic or electric nail gun
 

stephen thomas

Active member
Been watching this and am prepared to consider that it is spam primarily given low post count.
Building pallets is not really of major interest on a woodworking site, neither is construction, generally.
However, there is leeway historically, & the question is legitimate on the face of it.

So far the actual spam links have been provided by PeteM & atomarc, humour appreciated.

The real question is...why ask about nail guns on a machinists site?
The real question is...why hang out on the woodwhacking forum if woodworking tool questions, albeit loosely related ones, offend you?

smt
 

Rob F.

Active member
I want to make some pallets with nail gun, but I don’t know if I should buy a pneumatic or electric nail gun

That will depend on how many pallets you want to make. Are you making one pallet every few days or are you making truckloads of pallets ...
Also will depend a little if you have air available or also need to get a compressor. But generally I would get a pneumatic (hitachi nr83) I would only get a battery gun if you were doing very little AND had no compressor AND had tools already that used the same batteries.
 

4GSR

Active member
Ignore the riff rats here :stirthepot: and get you a pneumatic nail gun that shoots No. 8 ring shank or spiral shank nails and get after it!
 

Big B

Active member
I like my Paslode gas powered framing nailer because it's nice to not have to drag a hose around. But if I were making pallets out of 3/4 inch top boards I'd probably use my 7/16 stapler with 2" staples. It's pneumatic but dragging a hose around doesn't seem like much of a problem for building pallets.
 








 
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