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QT15 T32-2 Stuck in E-Stop

hwgasdfasdf

Plastic
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
I'm trying to help someone diagnose their Mazak QT15 with a T32-2 control.
The lathe is stuck in e-stop. The e-stop circuit has been verified that it's closed, both physically at the wiring, and in the diagnose memory screen (both X26 and X27 show closed (1's) in the diagnose memory screen - as well as the hydraulic pressure switch at X0C is also a 1 (closed) which seems to be a common failure / problem).

Are there any other interlocks that can cause the machine to be stuck in e-stop?

Does Mazak follow this additional e-stop criteria from the Meldas M300 manual (seeing as it's all M300 series hardware behind the Mazak firmware), where beyond the direct e-stop inputs, the servo / spindle amplifiers, or other cards can be causing it to be in e-stop? Can R69 be used to more finely diagnose what's causing it to be in e-stop on the T32-2 control?
 

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and what is in your R69 data register now?
somewhere in ALARMS there must be R69 broken down like: 24DC, EMG and so on.
 
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This may be totally irrelevant, I spent 4 hours trying to get a machine out of E-Stop only to find there was no air pressure. I have also worked on machines where lube level causes the same thing.
 
and what is in your R69 data register now?
somewhere in ALARMS there must be R69 broken down like: 24DC, EMG and so on.

I haven't been at the machine yet to check what R69 contents currently are (or get the person that is there to look at R69 in the diagnosis memory screen and take a picture). I just found that in the M300 manual over the weekend and was wondering if that's a valid place to look, considering that warning in the manual that it might not be valid on all machines.
 
This may be totally irrelevant, I spent 4 hours trying to get a machine out of E-Stop only to find there was no air pressure. I have also worked on machines where lube level causes the same thing.

Looking at the wiring diagram, I wondered the same thing, lube level, hydraulic pressure, and air pressure. It has lube oil in it, and when the bijour style pump runs (or the plunger is pulled up manually), the pressure switch on the lube line changes state in the I/O monitor as it should. The main hydraulic pressure switch (at X0C) is showing pressure, as is the gauge on the front of the machine. In the wiring diagram, the air pressure switch says "optional" and the owner said the machine has NEVER been connected to air.

The machine was running, and then someone e-stopped it, and now it's permanently stuck in e-stop, even though the X26 internal and X27 external e-stops both are not activated (as seen in the memory diagnosis screen, and by checking the actual voltage on the boards). It makes me question whether a second set of contacts on the e-stop switch connects through the "operation board" on the console and that set of contacts in the e-stop button is bad or something.
 
Did this machine have an external bar feeder connected to it at some point?

If it did, not recently (aka not for the last many years). The "external estop" has the shorting clip from +24 to EMG-E on the terminal block, which would normally be going to the bar feeder if one was there. This isn't a newly moved in machine, this is a machine that was running parts, was e-stopped, and now is permanently stuck in e-stop.

The owner seemed to indicate he's suspicious of a hydraulic problem, and the turret not pulling in properly, but the TCLAMP input shows that the turret is indeed clamped. I questioned whether the tool position indicators (and the parity bit) should all be 0 (inputs X02 through X06), and was told that even if the tool position is in an invalid state, it shouldn't put the whole machine into e-stop.
 
To answer one of your questions, yes the E-Stop circuit depends on the servo and spindle drives, hydraulics, power supplies, breakers, and fuses to all be in a ready state.

If a crash caused the E-Stop, it is possible to kill one of the older servo drives from the shock overload.

Search your electrical cabinet high and low for tripped breakers, blown fuses (small ones in the spindle drive), or tripped thermal overloads (must unscrew and swing inner panel clear to access contactors and thermals).

Your 24V DC circuit can cause an E-Stop as well. Make sure there's no "shorts or opens".

There is a "Machine Ready" circuit that runs through the ice cube relay circuit board inside the electrical cabinet...make sure it's not falling down on you.

Ultimately you can use the ladder logic and check all I/O's till you find the one causing the problem (it's a bunch for E-stop...)

Good luck with it!

ToolCat
 
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To answer one of your questions, yes the E-Stop circuit depends on the servo and spindle drives, hydraulics, power supplies, breakers, and fuses to all be in a ready state.

If a crash caused the E-Stop, it is possible to kill one of the older servo drives from the shock overload.

Search your electrical cabinet high and low for tripped breakers, blown fuses (small ones in the spindle drive), or tripped thermal overloads (must unscrew and swing inner panel clear to access contactors and thermals).

Your 24V DC circuit can cause an E-Stop as well. Make sure there's no "shorts or opens".

There is a "Machine Ready" circuit that runs through the ice cube relay circuit board inside the electrical cabinet...make sure it's not falling down on you.

Ultimately you can use the ladder logic and check all I/O's till you find the one causing the problem (it's a bunch for E-stop...)

Good luck with it!

ToolCat

This machine does not have the ladder monitor enabled. I'm pretty sure I know how to turn it on, but I've also heard that you need a MC455 card with the right MC841 installed for it to work anyway? Is that accurate? But even with all of that, for e-stop, it doesn't seem like the ladder helps much anyway - it seems like all the e-stop sources come into the NC and bypass the ladder, which is why I'd like to know if R69 shows the various states of the various sources of e-stop to help narrow it down.

I also may not have the correct paper ladder for this machine. Do you know if the ladder for T32B is the same as the ladder for T32-2? The other person I was talking to only had a T32B ladder available, and he thought they were the same, but wasn't sure.
 
optional param O29 bit 0 to 1 and after write it to EEPROM. Never worked for me. Probably only works on specific hardware or T32 types control and if machine can write params into EEPROM. Must admit, T32 is absolute horror when it comes to Mitsubishi products. Thanks God they quickly ,managed to create one of most reliable products T+ control

You can easily test R69 but creating all sorts of problems with your machine and checking its status. No harm in trying
 
This might sound silly, but the Mazak estops have to be rotated ( I think ccw) to unlock.

The switch is connected (it's showing up as closed in the memory monitor, so theoretically that's testing everything from the power supply, through the entire e-stop circuit, to the I/O card, and into the software). It's not the actual e-stop circuit that's putting it in e-stop - it's one of the other things in the diagram on the second attachment in my original message, which can all work in parallel, and any one of them can put the whole machine in e-stop.

My only question with the switch is if they wired 2 circuits on the switch, one to the actual e-stop circuit, and one to the operation board (the dashed lines on the right lower side of that diagram). If one set of contacts on the switch is working (the normal e-stop circuit), and the other circuit is not (going through the operation board), that could be causing the issue. But from the wiring diagram, it doesn't appear to be wired that way.
 
optional param O29 bit 0 to 1 and after write it to EEPROM. Never worked for me. Probably only works on specific hardware or T32 types control and if machine can write params into EEPROM. Must admit, T32 is absolute horror when it comes to Mitsubishi products. Thanks God they quickly ,managed to create one of most reliable products T+ control

You can easily test R69 but creating all sorts of problems with your machine and checking its status. No harm in trying

I don't think Mitsubishi is to blame for the horror show that is this garbage - that blame is squarely on Mazak. The whole Mazak system is Mitsubishi hardware with custom Mazak firmware on top. The original Mitsubishi firmware is much better - I have a mill that uses essentially the same hardware but with the real Mitsubishi firmware - EVERYTHING is easier and makes more sense in the Mitsubishi firmware. It's the Mazak software that makes it suck
 
optional param O29 bit 0 to 1 and after write it to EEPROM. Never worked for me. Probably only works on specific hardware or T32 types control and if machine can write params into EEPROM. Must admit, T32 is absolute horror when it comes to Mitsubishi products. Thanks God they quickly ,managed to create one of most reliable products T+ control

You can easily test R69 but creating all sorts of problems with your machine and checking its status. No harm in trying

Hmm, from another thread here, it seemed like O13 bit 3 was the ladder monitor...
You're saying O29 bit 0 and 1? Is that for a T32-2, or a slightly different control? They seem to have changed things around considerably for every slightly different controller, which leads to the Mazak confusion...
 
I honestly don't know, it is all Big Brother's Mazak secret agenda, to keep everything hush hush
 

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  • _Mazak M32 T32 All Models Descriptions.pdf
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