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Rare Holbrook H20 Lathe

Limy Sami

Diamond
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Location
Norfolk, UK

lucky7

Stainless
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Location
Canada
I think I used a smaller cousin Holbrook in training years ago. Same layout at least. Why do you like it more than a DSG? I don't have that much time on either, but found a 13" and 17" DSG so easy to use.

L7
 

gbent

Diamond
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Location
Kansas
Thanks for the link to the brochure Sami. Tony's site doesn't even have anything on Holbrook Model H machines.

Certainly a nice looking lathe. The 1000 rpm standard top speed (666 was listed as an optional top speed) suggests carbide wasn't in significant usage at the time of design.

I didn't see a machine weight or shipping weight listed in the brochure.
 

Limy Sami

Diamond
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Location
Norfolk, UK
I think I used a smaller cousin Holbrook in training years ago. Same layout at least. Why do you like it more than a DSG? I don't have that much time on either, but found a 13" and 17" DSG so easy to use.

L7

Lucky you if it was an H series, .....as to why Hollys a pre WW II flat belt Holly was the first industrial pro lathe I used:) ...and I've always found that Hollys do what they're told, ......if you want 0.002 off that's what they give, not what they felt like ;)

I've used both the B & C series Holbrooks, and liked them both - a lot, but never an H, of which I have only ever seen one, and was told by the owner and user, a guy I respected they were something else, .and NO he didn't let me take it round the block :(

Yes the DS&G's are very nice lathes, especially on heavy production work, but on toolroom type work, which is what the Holly was designed for, ....IMHO, when it comes to finesse etc etc they just have the edge, ......but I freely admit that between a good DS&G and Holbrook, there's not much to choose between them.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
Lucky you if it was an H series, .....as to why Hollys a pre WW II flat belt Holly was the first industrial pro lathe I used:) ...and I've always found that Hollys do what they're told, ......if you want 0.002 off that's what they give, not what they felt like ;)

I've used both the B & C series Holbrooks, and liked them noth - a lot, but never an H, of which I have only ever seen one, and was told by the owner and user, a guy I respected they were something else, .and NO he didn't let me take it round the bloke :(

Yes the DS&G's are very nice lathes, especially on heavy production work, but on toolroom type work, which is what the Holly was designed for, ....IMHO, when it comes to finesse etc etc they just have the edge, ......but I freely admit that between a good DS&G and Holbrook, there's not much to choose between them.

I've never seen one in the flesh Sami but the lathe in the two photos looks the " dogs bollocks " as we say up here. It's a really beautiful machine.

Regards Tyrone.
 

Limy Sami

Diamond
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Location
Norfolk, UK
Thanks for the link to the brochure Sami. Tony's site doesn't even have anything on Holbrook Model H machines.

Certainly a nice looking lathe. The 1000 rpm standard top speed (666 was listed as an optional top speed) suggests carbide wasn't in significant usage at the time of design.

I didn't see a machine weight or shipping weight listed in the brochure.

Carbide was in common use then, but the speeds were nowhere near as high as they are today , and the Holbrook was always considered a ''tool room'' machine where mass metal removal in the shortest possible time was not top priority, ............and generally speaking, back then British machine shops didn't have the same ethos as yours.

A Holly will hog, to the point your nerve will give out before the machine (or mine will anyway :eek: ) ) just maybe not quite as quickly.

As to weight, I don't know the exact #'s but it will be HEAVY - Holbrooks never did light?? I wouldn't be at all surprised if that H20 went over 4 tons (8 - 9000 lbs) or even more.
 

lucky7

Stainless
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Location
Canada
I learn something most days on this site. But "dog's bullocks"? I think yer speaking English? And bullocks are a good thing?

L7

feel free to educate me more in proper English ;-)

and come to think of it, we say "cat's ass" here for same effect... Perhaps cats are more respected in GB?
 

Limy Sami

Diamond
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Location
Norfolk, UK
You said herbert. Was herbert the manufacturer of the H series, and was that the same herbert DeVlieg trusted to make jigmils on that side of the pond?

The one and same, Herberts were rated as ''about the best'' UK machine tool builders on Tonys site I think it says when Holbrooks became part of Alfred Herbert, ....and I think Holbrooks designers were retained, ..met one of them once - 95ish rings a bell? ..... long after Herberts and Holbrooks had gone, - Richard Anderson?? lived up Rugby way, .....I went to look at C10 he had for sale, (and like a muppet didn't buy it :rolleyes5: .....wrong place and time etc et ) and he told me that he owned the Holbrook name and designs e etc etc that he'd bought from the ashes of the company.

IIRC he was in his late 50's - early 60's, the Holbrook Minor and Major had been his design, ...... one of the strings to his bow was assessing used Holbrooks for possible purchasers.
 

TedinNorfolk

Hot Rolled
Joined
Oct 17, 2006
Location
Norfolk, UK
Had four Hollies through my hands,three rescued from the pot. All had to go for a variety of reasons,but went to good homes. Lovely old iron-if I find another will keep it!
 

pressbrake1

Stainless
Joined
Dec 8, 2012
Location
essex england
You said herbert. Was herbert the manufacturer of the H series, and was that the same herbert DeVlieg trusted to make jigmils on that side of the pond?

Theres a reason why herbert stuff is still working hard today, they made excellent machines with first class materials
 

RC99

Diamond
Joined
Mar 26, 2005
Location
near Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
I see in the brochure the threading plate, they do not do 27tpi (for NPT threads). I have found a lot of manual lathes seem to miss out on a couple of common thread pitches.

If they do 27 they usually do not do 19 (for the BSP threads) If they do 19 they will not usually do 27.
 








 
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